National Print Museum

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The National Print Museum in Dublin collects, documents, preserves, exhibits, interprets and makes accessible the material evidence of printing craft and fosters associated skills of the craft in Ireland. Opened in 1996, the National Print Museum is a place for printers, historians, students and the general public to see and hear how printing developed and brought information, in all its forms, to the world.

The Museum is fully accredited under The Heritage Council’s Museum Standards Programme for Ireland.[1] On exhibit is a representative display of the equipment and artefacts of the rich centuries-old printing heritage. Items include a replica Gutenberg press (on loan from The Tudors TV series) and an original 1916 Proclamation (on loan until 2016) along with a machine (Wharfedale) similar to the one it was printed on. The National Print Museum's activities include guided tours, exhibitions, workshops, outreach, lectures, demonstrations days, and many other special events.

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Coordinates: 53°20′08″N 6°14′05″W / 53.3355°N 6.2346°W / 53.3355; -6.2346