National Register of Historic Places listings in Nicollet County, Minnesota

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Location of Nicollet County in Minnesota

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Nicollet County, Minnesota. It is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Nicollet County, Minnesota, United States. The locations of National Register properties and districts for which the latitude and longitude coordinates are included below, may be seen in an online map.[1]

There are 24 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county. A supplementary list includes two additional sites that were formerly on the National Register.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted September 19, 2014.[2]

Current listings[edit]


[3] Name on the Register Image Date listed[4] Location City or town Description
1 Broadway Bridge
Broadway Bridge
August 5, 1999
(#99000934)
Minnesota Highway 99 over the Minnesota River
44°19′29″N 93°57′11″W / 44.324719°N 93.953024°W / 44.324719; -93.953024 (Broadway Bridge)
Oshawa Township 1931 through truss bridge.[5] Extends into Le Sueur County.
2 Center Building-Minnesota Hospital for The Insane Upload image
July 31, 1986
(#86002117)
Freeman Dr.
44°18′19″N 93°58′40″W / 44.305416°N 93.977783°W / 44.305416; -93.977783 (Center Building-Minnesota Hospital for The Insane)
St. Peter 1878 Classical Revival building of Minnesota's first mental hospital, designed by Samuel Sloan on the Kirkbride Plan.[5]
3 Church of the Holy Communion-Episcopal
Church of the Holy Communion-Episcopal
May 19, 1983
(#83000914)
116 N. Minnesota Ave.
44°19′36″N 93°57′20″W / 44.326595°N 93.955525°W / 44.326595; -93.955525 (Church of the Holy Communion-Episcopal)
St. Peter 1870 Gothic Revival church of Kasota limestone, designed by Henry Martyn Congdon.[5]
4 Eugene Saint Julien Cox House
Eugene Saint Julien Cox House
November 20, 1970
(#70000305)
500 N. Washington Ave.
44°19′56″N 93°57′42″W / 44.332345°N 93.961654°W / 44.332345; -93.961654 (Eugene Saint Julien Cox House)
St. Peter 1871 Gothic/Italianate house of St. Peter's first mayor. Now a Nicollet County Historical Society site.[6]
5 Frederick A. Donahower House
Frederick A. Donahower House
May 19, 1983
(#83000915)
720 S. Minnesota Ave.
44°19′13″N 93°57′40″W / 44.320396°N 93.961061°W / 44.320396; -93.961061 (Frederick A. Donahower House)
St. Peter c. 1875 brick Italianate house with limestone trim.[5]
6 Fort Ridgely
Fort Ridgely
December 2, 1970
(#70000304)
Minnesota Highway 4
44°27′11″N 94°44′04″W / 44.452968°N 94.734381°W / 44.452968; -94.734381 (Fort Ridgely)
Fairfax 1853 U.S. Army fort built to monitor the Lower Sioux Indian Reservation. Site of the Battle of Fort Ridgely during the Dakota War of 1862. Now a state park and historic site.[7]
7 Fort Ridgely State Park CCC/Rustic Style Historic Resources
Fort Ridgely State Park CCC/Rustic Style Historic Resources
October 25, 1989
(#89001668)
Off County Highway 30 northwest of New Ulm
44°27′11″N 94°43′51″W / 44.45301°N 94.730773°W / 44.45301; -94.730773 (Fort Ridgely State Park CCC/Rustic Style Historic Resources)
New Ulm 27 Rustic Style park structures built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the mid-1930s.[8]
8 Alexander Harkin Store
Alexander Harkin Store
June 4, 1973
(#73000989)
County highway 21
44°23′13″N 94°35′56″W / 44.386944°N 94.598889°W / 44.386944; -94.598889 (Alexander Harkin Store)
New Ulm 1871 rural store and post office, now a Minnesota Historical Society museum with much of the original inventory intact.[9]
9 John A. Johnson House
John A. Johnson House
May 19, 1983
(#83000916)
418 N. 3rd St.
44°19′47″N 93°57′17″W / 44.329824°N 93.954642°W / 44.329824; -93.954642 (John A. Johnson House)
St. Peter 1905 frame house of three-term governor John Albert Johnson.[5]
10 Sarah and Thomas Montgomery House
Sarah and Thomas Montgomery House
December 13, 2000
(#00001509)
408 Washington Ave. S
44°19′32″N 93°57′51″W / 44.325523°N 93.964176°W / 44.325523; -93.964176 (Sarah and Thomas Montgomery House)
St. Peter 1874 brick Italianate house.[5]
11 Nicollet County Bank
Nicollet County Bank
May 19, 1983
(#83000917)
224 S. Minnesota Ave.
44°19′28″N 93°57′27″W / 44.324409°N 93.957379°W / 44.324409; -93.957379 (Nicollet County Bank)
St. Peter 1887 brick Queen Anne bank with Kasota limestone trim.[5] Also a contributing property to the St. Peter Commercial Historic District.[10]
12 Nicollet County Courthouse and Jail
Nicollet County Courthouse and Jail
September 6, 2002
(#02000939)
501 S, Minnesota Ave.
44°19′18″N 93°57′31″W / 44.321751°N 93.958597°W / 44.321751; -93.958597 (Nicollet County Courthouse and Jail)
St. Peter 1881 brick Romanesque Revival courthouse designed by Edward Bassford, and 1907 brick Queen Anne jailhouse.[5]
13 Nicollet Hotel
Nicollet Hotel
May 12, 1975
(#75000998)
Minnesota Ave. at Park Row
44°19′31″N 93°57′24″W / 44.325285°N 93.956749°W / 44.325285; -93.956749 (Nicollet Hotel)
St. Peter 1874 brick Italianate hotel designed by Edward Bassford.[5]
14 Norseland General Store
Norseland General Store
May 19, 1983
(#83000918)
Minnesota Highway 22
44°24′43″N 94°06′56″W / 44.411892°N 94.115592°W / 44.411892; -94.115592 (Norseland General Store)
Lake Prairie Township c. 1900 rural store.[5]
15 North Mankato Public School
North Mankato Public School
January 27, 1983
(#83000919)
442 Belgrade Ave.
44°10′13″N 94°00′48″W / 44.170351°N 94.013204°W / 44.170351; -94.013204 (North Mankato Public School)
North Mankato 1890 brick Queen Anne school with a 1904 addition.[5]
16 Old Main, Gustavus Adolphus College
Old Main, Gustavus Adolphus College
May 12, 1976
(#76001065)
Gustavus Adolphus College campus
44°19′23″N 93°58′14″W / 44.322954°N 93.970648°W / 44.322954; -93.970648 (Old Main, Gustavus Adolphus College)
St. Peter 1876 Italianate campus building of Kasota limestone, designed by Edward Bassford.[5]
17 Emily and Stephen Schumacher House
Emily and Stephen Schumacher House
December 13, 2000
(#00001507)
202 3rd St., N.
44°19′40″N 93°57′23″W / 44.327737°N 93.956477°W / 44.327737; -93.956477 (Emily and Stephen Schumacher House)
St. Peter 1888 brick Queen Anne house.[5]
18 St. Peter Armory
St. Peter Armory
January 9, 1997
(#96001558)
419 S. Minnesota Ave.
44°19′21″N 93°57′29″W / 44.322595°N 93.958015°W / 44.322595; -93.958015 (St. Peter Armory)
St. Peter 1913 brick Gothic Revival armory with Kasota limestone trim, first state-owned National Guard armory in Minnesota.[5]
19 St. Peter Carnegie Library
St. Peter Carnegie Library
May 19, 1983
(#83000920)
429 S. Minnesota Ave.
44°19′21″N 93°57′29″W / 44.322486°N 93.958151°W / 44.322486; -93.958151 (St. Peter Carnegie Library)
St. Peter 1904 Classical Revival Carnegie library.[5]
20 St. Peter Commercial Historic District
St. Peter Commercial Historic District
January 12, 2001
(#00001610)
Minnesota Ave. between Broadway and Grace Sts.
44°19′28″N 93°57′24″W / 44.324551°N 93.956797°W / 44.324551; -93.956797 (St. Peter Commercial Historic District)
St. Peter Late-19th and early-20th-century commercial buildings, largely of brick with stone trim.[5]
21 William E. Stewart House
William E. Stewart House
November 8, 1984
(#84000223)
733 Range St.
44°10′30″N 94°00′32″W / 44.174943°N 94.008948°W / 44.174943; -94.008948 (William E. Stewart House)
North Mankato 1910 brick house and outbuildings built adjacent to owner's brickyard.[5]
22 Henry A. Swift House
Henry A. Swift House
May 19, 1983
(#83000921)
820 S. Minnesota Ave.
44°19′10″N 93°57′42″W / 44.319398°N 93.961769°W / 44.319398; -93.961769 (Henry A. Swift House)
St. Peter 1858 Federal/Italianate house of politician Henry Adoniram Swift.[5]
23 Traverse des Sioux
Traverse des Sioux
March 20, 1973
(#73000990)
2 miles north of St. Peter off U.S. Route 169
44°21′23″N 93°57′15″W / 44.356402°N 93.954265°W / 44.356402; -93.954265 (Traverse des Sioux)
St. Peter An important river crossing from prehistory into the fur trade era, and site of U.S.–Dakota negotiations for the 1851 Treaty of Traverse des Sioux. Now a state and Nicollet County Historical Society site.[11]
24 Union Presbyterian Church
Union Presbyterian Church
May 19, 1983
(#83000922)
311 W. Locust St.
44°19′15″N 93°57′45″W / 44.320844°N 93.962478°W / 44.320844; -93.962478 (Union Presbyterian Church)
St. Peter 1872 Gothic Revival church of Kasota limestone.[5]

Former listings[edit]

[3] Name on the Register Image Date listed Date removed Location City or town Summary
1 Bridge No. 6422-Saint Peter Upload image
August 5, 1999
(#99000933)
August 8, 2003
MN 99 over Washington Avenue
St. Peter 1948 deck girder bridge of cantilevered concrete, first of its kind in Minnesota.[5] Demolished in 2001.[12]
2 St. Peter Central School
St. Peter Central School
October 29, 1980
(#80002092)
October 5, 2000
300 S. 5th St.
44°19′32″N 93°57′42″W / 44.325556°N 93.961667°W / 44.325556; -93.961667 (St. Peter Central School)
St. Peter Destroyed in the 1998 Comfrey – St. Peter tornado outbreak. Original façade worked into Central Square Apartments on the same site.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The latitude and longitude information provided in this table was derived originally from the National Register Information System, which has been found to be fairly accurate for about 99% of listings. For about 1% of NRIS original coordinates, experience has shown that one or both coordinates are typos or otherwise extremely far off; some corrections may have been made. A more subtle problem causes many locations to be off by up to 150 yards, depending on location in the country: most NRIS coordinates were derived from tracing out latitude and longitudes off of USGS topographical quadrant maps created under the North American Datum of 1927, which differs from the current, highly accurate WGS84 GPS system used by most on-line maps. Chicago is about right, but NRIS longitudes in Washington are higher by about 4.5 seconds, and are lower by about 2.0 seconds in Maine. Latitudes differ by about 1.0 second in Florida. Some locations in this table may have been corrected to current GPS standards.
  2. ^ "National Register of Historic Places: Weekly List Actions". National Park Service, United States Department of the Interior. Retrieved on September 19, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Numbers represent an ordering by significant words. Various colorings, defined here, differentiate National Historic Landmarks and historic districts from other NRHP buildings, structures, sites or objects.
  4. ^ The eight-digit number below each date is the number assigned to each location in the National Register Information System database, which can be viewed by clicking the number.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Nord, Mary Ann (2003). The National Register of Historic Places in Minnesota. Minnesota Historical Society. ISBN 0-87351-448-3. 
  6. ^ Hanson, Krista Finstad (2007). Minnesota Open House: A Guide to Historic House Museums. St. Paul, Minn.: Minnesota Historical Society Press. ISBN 978-0-87351-577-1. 
  7. ^ "Fort Ridgely". Minnesota Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-09-18. 
  8. ^ "Fort Ridgely State Park". Rustic Style Resources in Minnesota State Parks. Minnesota Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-08-26. 
  9. ^ "Harkin Store". Minnesota Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-09-18. 
  10. ^ "St. Peter Commercial Historic District". Minnesota Historical Society. 2009. Retrieved 2013-03-01. 
  11. ^ "Traverse des Sioux". Minnesota Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-09-18. 
  12. ^ "Changes to the National Register of Historic Places in Minnesota, 2003-2010". Minnesota State Historic Preservation Office. 2011-02-01. Retrieved 2013-03-01. 

External links[edit]