List of national stadiums

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Many countries have a national sport stadium, which typically serves as the primary or exclusive home for one or more of a country's national representative sports teams. The term is most often used in reference to an association football stadium. Usually, a national stadium will be in or very near a country's capital city or largest city. It is generally (but not always) the country's largest and most lavish sports venue with a rich history of hosting a major moment in sports (i.e. FIFA World Cup, Olympics, etc.). In many, but not all cases, it is also used by a local team. Many countries, including Spain and the United States, do not have a National Stadium designated as such; instead matches are rotated throughout the country. The lack of a national stadium can be seen as advantageous as designating a single stadium would limit the fan base capable of realistically attending matches as well as the concern of the cost of transportation, especially in the case of the United States due to its geographical size and high population.

A list of national stadiums follows:

Contents

Afghanistan[edit]

Albania[edit]

Algeria[edit]

Andorra[edit]

Angola[edit]

Antigua and Barbuda[edit]

Argentina[edit]

Armenia[edit]

Australia[edit]

Australia does not have an official national stadium, yet its two biggest stadiums alternate hosting large events are the following:

Austria[edit]

Azerbaijan[edit]

Bahamas[edit]

Bahrain[edit]

Bangladesh[edit]

Barbados[edit]

Belarus[edit]

Belgium[edit]

Benin[edit]

Bermuda[edit]

Bhutan[edit]

Bolivia[edit]

Bosnia and Herzegovina[edit]

Botswana[edit]

Brazil[edit]

Brazil does not have an official national stadium. Large sports events (mostly football) are commonly held in alternate venues.

The biggest (and most well known) stadium in Brazil is Estádio do Maracanã located at Rio de Janeiro. The Brazilian national football team have most of their high-profile matches taken place in the Maracanã and the venue has hosted multiple World Cup and Copa America matches in its history.

Brunei Darussalam[edit]

Bulgaria[edit]

Burkina Faso[edit]

Burundi[edit]

Cambodia[edit]

Cameroon[edit]

Canada[edit]

Prior to confederation into Canada, the Dominion of Newfoundland used King George V Park as its national stadium.

Cape Verde[edit]

Central African Republic[edit]

Chad[edit]

Chile[edit]

People's Republic of China[edit]

Colombia[edit]

Republic of the Congo[edit]

Democratic Republic of the Congo[edit]

Cook Islands[edit]

Costa Rica[edit]

Croatia[edit]

Cuba[edit]

Cyprus[edit]

Czech Republic[edit]

Denmark[edit]

Djibouti[edit]

Dominica[edit]

Dominican Republic[edit]

East Timor[edit]

Ecuador[edit]

Egypt[edit]

El Salvador[edit]

Equatorial Guinea[edit]

Eritrea[edit]

Estonia[edit]

Ethiopia[edit]

Faroe Islands[edit]

Fiji[edit]

Finland[edit]

France[edit]

Gabon[edit]

The Gambia[edit]

Georgia[edit]

Germany[edit]

  • The German national football team usually plays at different stadiums throughout the country. However, the venue for the German Cup Final is the Olympic Stadium in Berlin.

Ghana[edit]

Greece[edit]

Greenland[edit]

Grenada[edit]

Guatemala[edit]

Guinea[edit]

Guinea-Bissau[edit]

Guyana[edit]

Honduras[edit]

Hong Kong[edit]

Hungary[edit]

Iceland[edit]

India[edit]

Indonesia[edit]

Iran[edit]

Iraq[edit]

Republic of Ireland[edit]

Israel[edit]

Italy[edit]

Ivory Coast[edit]

Jamaica[edit]

Japan[edit]

Kenya[edit]

Kiribati[edit]

Republic of Korea[edit]

Democratic People's Republic of Korea[edit]

Kurdistan[edit]

Kyrgyzstan[edit]

Lesotho[edit]

Lebanon[edit]

Luxembourg[edit]

Libya[edit]

Liechtenstein[edit]

Lithuania[edit]

Macedonia[edit]

Malaysia[edit]

Malta[edit]

Martinique[edit]

Mexico[edit]

Moldova[edit]

Monaco[edit]

Montenegro[edit]

Morocco[edit]

Namibia[edit]

Netherlands[edit]

New Zealand[edit]

Nicaragua[edit]

Nigeria[edit]

Norway[edit]

Pakistan[edit]

Palau[edit]

Panama[edit]

Paraguay[edit]

Peru[edit]

Philippines[edit]

Poland[edit]

Portugal[edit]

Romania[edit]

Russia[edit]

Saint Kitts and Nevis[edit]

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines[edit]

Serbia[edit]

Singapore[edit]

Somalia[edit]

Spain[edit]

  • The Spanish national football team usually plays at different stadiums throughout the country. However, it uses two stadiums frequently for exhibition and tournament qualification matches: Camp Nou (home ground of F.C. Barcelona) is the biggest stadium in Spain and in Europe, and Santiago Bernabéu Stadium (Real Madrid) has hosted important games like the 1982 FIFA World Cup Final, as well as it is located in its capital.

Sierra Leone[edit]

South Africa[edit]

The national football, rugby union and cricket teams all play at various venues throughout South Africa. However, these are the de facto national stadiums:

Suriname[edit]

Sweden[edit]

Switzerland[edit]

Syria[edit]

Taiwan[edit]

Tajikistan[edit]

Tanzania[edit]

Thailand[edit]

Trinidad and Tobago[edit]

Turkey[edit]

Turkmenistan[edit]

Tunisia[edit]

Ukraine[edit]

United Kingdom[edit]

Team sports in the United Kingdom are often governed by bodies representing the Home Nations of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland – with some sports organised on an All-Ireland basis. In international sporting events these sports are contested not by a team representing the United Kingdom, but by teams representing the separate home nations, and as a result there are separate national stadiums for many sports.

England[edit]

Northern Ireland[edit]

Scotland[edit]

Wales[edit]

United States[edit]

  • Like Spain, Brazil, Germany or Italy, the US soccer team has no dedicated stadium or arena. They play at different venues throughout the country for exhibition or tournament purposes. However, 21 games have been held on RFK Stadium in the country's capital, Washington, D.C., more than any other venue in the country, which led to suggestions that RFK Memorial is the de facto national stadium.[1][2] The women's soccer team also has no dedicated venue.
  • Most of the most popular sports in the United States do not rely on a single national stadium, instead rotating the highest profile contests among various neutral sites.

Uruguay[edit]

Venezuela[edit]

Vietnam[edit]

Zimbabwe[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ RFK as our National Soccer Stadium: News. Match Fit USA (2009-10-20). Retrieved on 2011-12-24.
  2. ^ Bill Simmons "Every big American soccer game should be played in RFK." News: ESPN. Sports.espn.go.com (2009-10-16). Retrieved on 2011-12-24.