National Survey of Family Growth

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The National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) is a survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics division of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to understand trends related to fertility, family structure, and demographics in the United States.[1]

History and details[edit]

The National Survey of Family Growth is conducted in five-year cycles. In each cycle, surveys are administered via personal interviews with people at homes. The interviewees generally comprise only the civilian, non-institutionalized population.[2]

The cycles so far have been:[3]

  • Cycle 1, started 1973[4]
  • Cycle 2, started 1976[5]
  • Cycle 3, started 1982[6]
  • Cycle 4, started 1988[7]
  • Cycle 5, started 1995[8]
  • Cycle 6, started 2002[9]
  • 2006-2010 NSFG[10]
  • 2011-2015 (ongoing, data not available)[2]

While Cycles 1-5 surveyed only women, Cycle 6 and later surveyed both men and women and used households as the unit of analysis. Cycle 6 surveyed 12,571 respondents 15–44 years of age: 7,643 females and 4,928 males. The 2006-2010 NSFG surveyed 22,682 interviews: over 10,000 interviews with men and more than 12,000 interviews with women.[2] For Cycle 6 onward, the surveys were conducted in person by female interviewers who are hired and managed by the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research.[2] The survey samples are intended to be nationally representative but not necessarily representative at subnational levels (such as individual states, ethnicities, or religions).[2]

Data[edit]

For the survey cycles that have been completed, data is available both in the form of portable document format summaries and as full data files. In addition, program statements are available in SAS, SPSS, and STATA.[4]

Key statistics are also browsable online.[11]

NSFG data is also mirrored on the website of the University of Michigan's Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research.[12]

Reception and impact[edit]

Claims[edit]

The NSFG website claims that the NSFG is used as follows:[2]

  • by scholars in the behavioral sciences (e.g., sociology, demography, and economics) to study marriage, divorce, fertility, and family life;
  • by scholars in public health to study reproductive, maternal and infant health topics;
  • by agencies of the US Department of Health and Human Services, to brief senior officials and to inform program decision-making, in research programs and in health and social service programs.
  • by state and local governments to plan health and social service programs;
  • by private-sector research organizations which distribute the information to the public and to policy makers; and
  • by the press, to prepare articles on a number of topics related to health and family life.

Academic research[edit]

The NSFG website claims that the NSFG has been cited in "more than 600 journal articles, NCHS reports, and book chapters shown in our publication lists."[2] The research citing the NSFG is concentrated more on topics related to family planning, contraception, abortion, and fertility.[13][14][15]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Survey of Family Growth". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "About the National Survey of Family Growth". National Survey of Family Growth. Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Questionnaires, Datasets, and Related Documentation". Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  4. ^ a b "NSFG - Cycle 1 (1973): Public Use Data Files, Codebooks, and Documentation". National Survey of Family Growth. Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  5. ^ "NSFG - Cycle 2 (1976): Public Use Data Files, Codebooks, and Documentation". National Survey of Family Growth. Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  6. ^ "NSFG - Cycle 3 (1982): Public Use Data Files, Codebooks, and Documentation". National Survey of Family Growth. Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  7. ^ "NSFG - Cycle 4 (1988): Public Use Data Files, Codebooks, and Documentation". National Survey of Family Growth. Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  8. ^ "NSFG - Cycle 5 (1995): Public Use Data Files, Codebooks, and Documentation". National Survey of Family Growth. Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  9. ^ "NSFG - Cycle 6 (2002): Public Use Data Files, Codebooks, and Documentation". National Survey of Family Growth. Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  10. ^ "2006-2010 NSFG: Public Use Data Files, Codebooks, and Documentation". National Survey of Family Growth. Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  11. ^ "NSFG - Key Statistics". National Survey of Family Growth. Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  12. ^ "National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) Series". Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research, University of Michigan. Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  13. ^ Kost, Kathryn; Singh, Susheela; Vaughan, Barbara; Trussell, James; Bankole, Akinrinola (January 2008). "Estimates of contraceptive failure from the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth". Contraception 77 (1): 10–21. doi:10.1016/j.contraception.2007.09.013. PMC 2811396. PMID 18082661. 
  14. ^ Trussell, James; Vaughan, Barbara; Stanford, Joseph (September–October 1999). "Are All Contraceptive Failures Unintended Pregnancies? Evidence from the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth". Family Planning Perspectives 31 (5). Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  15. ^ Fu, Haishan; Darroch, Jacqueline E.; Henshaw, Stanley K.; Kolb, Elizabeth (May–June 1998). "Measuring the Extent of Abortion Underreporting In the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth". Family Planning Perspectives 30 (3). Retrieved April 22, 2014. 

External links[edit]