National Telefilm Associates

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National Telefilm Associates
Former type corporation
Fate Renamed into Republic Pictures.
Founded 1954
Defunct 1985
Owners Independent

National Telefilm Associates (otherwise known by its initials, NTA) was an independent distribution company that handled reissues of American film libraries, including much of Paramount Pictures' animated and short-subjects library.

History[edit]

NTA was founded by Ely Landau and Oliver A. Unger[1] in 1954 when Ely Landau, Inc. was reorganized in partnership with Unger and Harold Goldman.[2] NTA was the successor company to U.M.&M. T.V. Corp, which it bought out in 1956.[2]

In October 1956, NTA launched the NTA Film Network, a syndication service which distributed both film and live programs to television stations not affiliated with NBC, CBS, or ABC (DuMont had recently gone out of business). The ad-hoc network's flagship station was WNTA-TV, channel 13 in New York.[3] The NTA Network was launched as a "fourth TV network", and trade papers of the time referred to it as a new television network.[4]

The NTA network launched on October 15, 1956, with over 100 affiliate stations.[5] NTA programming included syndicated programs such as Police Call (1955),[6] How to Marry a Millionaire (1957-1959), The Passerby, Man Without a Gun (1957-1959), and This is Alice (1958). The network also distributed 52 Twentieth Century Fox films in 1956.[3] In November of the same year, it was announced that 50% of the network had been purchased by Twentieth Century-Fox, which would also produce original content for the network.[5]

In January 1959, Ely Landau was succeeded by Charles C. Barry, who took over as president of network operations. Landau continued to chair National Telefilm Associates.[7] Despite the 50% ownership of Twentieth Century Fox, the film network never developed into a major commercial television network on a par with the "Big Three" television networks; modern TV historians regard the NTA Film Network as a syndication service rather than a major television network. Twentieth Century-Fox would later launch a network of its own in 1986; the Fox Broadcasting Company is now regarded as part of the "Big Four" networks.

Among NTA's holdings:

In April 1973, NTA bought the library of NBC Films, the syndication arm of the NBC television network since March 1953, after the FCC ruled TV networks could not syndicate their own shows. Notable titles include Bonanza, The High Chaparral, Car 54, Where Are You?, Kimba the White Lion and Get Smart.

Like its U.M.&M. predecessor, NTA altered the original negatives to the Paramount black-and-white animated shorts, replacing the front-and-end titles. References to Paramount and Technicolor were blacked out, with the NTA logo replacing the Paramount mountain.

At the end of color prints, the NTA logo had a U.M.&M. copyright byline below it, but on black-and-white prints, the U.M.&M. copyright appeared where the original Paramount copyright had been.

On some shorts, either the original Paramount copyright line, the original color process line, the "Paramount Presents" line, or even part of the Paramount logo could still be seen for a few frames before the black bars appear. On one Little Audrey cartoon, the "spinning star" portion of the Paramount opening could still be seen. On the Little Lulu cartoons altered by NTA, they had no choice but to leave in the last part of the Paramount opening, albeit with much of it blacked out, since the "Little Lulu by Marge from The Saturday Evening Post" title card appeared over the Paramount mountain.

In 1983, NTA bought Blackhawk Films.

By 1983, NTA had launched a home video division to market its holdings. By the end of the decade, NTA had bought the name and trademarks of the old Republic studio and renamed itself Republic Pictures.

NTA/Republic changed hands in succeeding years, and distribution of the former NTA holdings is split—the theatrical rights are handled by Paramount Pictures, while television rights lie with Trifecta Entertainment & Media (for the theatrical output), and CBS Television Distribution (for the television library). When Republic folded in 2012, Viacom took full control of the former's theatrical library, with Olive Films handling home video rights to the theatrical catalog (except It's a Wonderful Life, which Paramount now distributes on DVD, among other selected films), while Paramount Home Entertainment (through CBS DVD) handles the television library for home video.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Oliver Unger Quits NTA; Charles Glett Successor". BOXOFFICE. 1961-05-29. Retrieved 2009-03-09. [dead link]
  2. ^ a b "U.M.&M. and NTA, a brief history". Archived from the original on 2009-08-06. Retrieved 2009-03-09. 
  3. ^ a b Golembiewski, Dick (2008). Milwaukee Television History: The Analog Years. Marquette University Press. pp. 280–281. ISBN 0-87462-055-4. 
  4. ^ "Fourth TV Network, for Films, is Created". Boxoffice. 1956-07-07. p. 8. 
  5. ^ a b "Fox Buys Into TV Network; Makes 390 Features Available". Boxoffice. 1956-11-03. p. 8. 
  6. ^ Billboard Magazine. August 18, 1956. 
  7. ^ "Barry Named President of NTA Film Network". Boxoffice. 1959-01-26. p. 17. 
  8. ^ Elliot, Mark. Cary Grant: a biography. (p. 366) Three Rivers Press, New York. ISBN 0-307-20983-0.