National Youth Orchestra of Scotland

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The National Youth Orchestras of Scotland (NYOS) is an organisation which provides 8 ensembles for students aged from 8 to 25 years old. It was first established in 1978 and gave its first concerts in 1979.[1][2]

NYOS Senior Orchestra[edit]

NYOS Senior Orchestra is the new orchestra for graduates of the NYOS Junior Orchestra and older students aged between 12 and 18 years old, aspiring to become members of The National Youth Orchestra of Scotland. Under NYOS’ new Orchestras Advisor, James Lowe, the NYOS Senior Orchestra will perform two concerts at top classical venues each year.

Annual membership to NYOS Senior Orchestra includes attendance at a residential preparatory weekend, residential spring course and residential summer course followed by the opportunity to experience the full orchestral performing experience at top venues across the UK.

NYOS Junior Orchestra[edit]

The National Childrens Orchestra has been replaced by NYOS Junior Orchestra for ambitious young musicians aged between 8 and 14 years old. NYOS Junior Orchestra is the first step on the ladder for aspiring members of The National Youth Orchestra of Scotland and provides opportunities to perform large-scale symphonic repertoire under the orchestra’s Chief Conductor, Dutch maestro Roland Kieft.

Annual membership to NYOS Junior Orchestra includes attendance at a residential preparatory weekend, residential spring course and residential summer course followed by the opportunity to experience the full orchestral performing experience at top venues across the UK.

NYOS Camerata[edit]

NYOS Camerata is the showcase, pre-professional chamber ensemble of The National Youth Orchestras of Scotland. Successfully bridging the gap between youth orchestra and professional ensemble, it comprises senior and recent past members of NYOS.

NYOS Futures[edit]

NYOS Futures is the cutting-edge contemporary chamber ensemble of NYOS. It is drawn from senior NYOS and Camerata Scotland musicians and aims to introduce young musicians and new audiences to the fascinating world of late 20th and early 21st century classical music. Membership of NYOS futures is by invitation.

The National Youth Jazz Orchestra of Scotland[edit]

The National Youth Jazz Orchestra of Scotland (NYJOS) is one of Scotland's foremost youth jazz ensembles. Under the direction of Malcolm Edmonstone and Andrew Bain, NYJOS aims to provide students with the opportunity to study and perform jazz at the highest possible level, with respected professional musicians from the UK and beyond.

NYJOS Access[edit]

NYJOS Access is a training ground for the next generation of top jazz musicians, giving up to 25 students aged 12-18 from across the whole of Scotland the opportunity to refine their improvisation and key solo and ensemble skills, as a step along the pathway to participation in the flagship NYJOS ensemble. Recent NYJOS Access performances have taken place at venues across Scotland, including the Edinburgh Jazz Bar, Paisley Grammar, Birnam Arts Institute, Eden Court and the National Museum of Scotland.

NYJOS Collective[edit]

NYJOS Collective comprises the most experienced and talented players from The National Youth Jazz Orchestra of Scotland. Essentially a jazz chamber ensemble, NYJOS Collective is a smaller and more flexible arm of the jazz orchestra. Throughout the year the ensemble gives concerts during residencies at a variety of venues around Scotland.

The ensemble offers the more experienced members of The National Youth Jazz Orchestra of Scotland the opportunity to publicly perform their own arrangements, play a wide variety of compositions and lead jazz workshops with members of the community and other jazz ensembles.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "History". NYOS. Retrieved 18 December 2014. 
  2. ^ Tumelty, Michael (1 January 2003). "Growing pains of youth; There is one, nagging problem for a resurgent National Youth Orchestra of Scotland". Glasgow Herald  – via HighBeam Research (subscription required). Retrieved 18 December 2014.