Nationalist-Religious movement

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شورای فعالان ملی مذهبی ایران
Nationalist-Religious Coalition
Leader Mohammad Tavasoli
Founder Ezatollah Sahabi
Founded 1 April 2003
Ideology Religious nationalism[citation needed]
Politics of Iran
Political parties
Elections

The Nationalist-Religious Coalition of Iran (Persian: شورای فعالان ملی مذهبی ایران‎; or Persian: ائتلاف نيروهای ملی-مذهبی‎, literally The Alliance of National-Religious Forces of Iran) is an Iranian political opposition party, which represents a number of smaller parties, political activists, writers and intellectual figures.

Formation[edit]

The alliance includes notable influential people like Ezzatollah Sahabi, Hoda Saber, Ebrahim Yazdi, Habibollah Peyman, Yousefi Eshkevari, Mohammad Tavasoli and also Reza Alijani, Ahmad Zeydabadi, Taghi Rahmani, Alireza Rajaee etc. Moreover, a number of important modern Iranian figures had been generally associated with the historical body of the alliance. Among them Ali Shariati, Mehdi Bazargan, Mahmoud Taleghani and Mohammad Nakhshab can be mentioned. The three organizations chiefly involved in its establishment in 2000 were the Freedom Movement of Iran (FMI, formed in 1961), the Revolutionary Movement of the People of Iran (Jonbesh-e Azadibakhsh-e Mardom-e Iran or JAMA, formed in 1963), and the Militant Muslim Movement (Jonbesh-e Mosalmanan-e Mardom or MMM, formed in 1976).

Orientation[edit]

The political and philosophical theoretical groundings of the alliance vary among the different parties and figures associated with it. Ali Shariati’s ideas about reformation in Islamic thought is, more or less, supported by all the branches of the alliance. Also, Mohammed Mosaddeq's Nationalism, which strongly considers the religious faith, is shared between the alliance's groups and people. Both leftist and rightist ideas and groups, are therefore gathered in the alliance over the centre of Nationalism and Islamic Reformation.

Organization[edit]

Official and public activities of the alliance have faced many difficulties by limiting policies of the Iran’s governments. The alliance does not have any official political body as of the modern parties. It does not have any membership procedure, official spokesman, formal central office, official meetings etc. About fifty members of the alliance were jailed in 2000 for nearly two years after an unofficial, periodical and normal meeting at a private house of one of the members.

Ezzatollah Sahabi, was president of the Alliance of the Nationalists-Religious Activists, that Iranian media and this is presumably by an internal agreement within the alliance itself. He was leader of Alliance until his death on 31 May 2011.

Hoda Saber Hunger Strike and Death[edit]

On 2 June 2011, Saber and another nationalist-religious figure, Amir Khosrow Dalirsani, stopped eating food and later stopped drinking water[3] to protest "the conditions that led to the death of Haleh Sahabi", and the government's crackdown against protesters. Saber was in imprisoned in Ward 350 of Evin Prison at the time. According to Muhammad Sahimi, eyewitnesses have said that during the six hours between the time he first complained of chest pain early Friday morning and when he was finally taken for medical treatment, Saber was screaming loudly in agony, but prison staff paid no attention to him. According to Melli Mazhabi, Saber's cellmates announced their readiness to testify in any court as to how his condition and cries were ignored. Saber died of a heart attack at Tehran's Modarres Hospital on 10 June 2011, aged 52. He was brought to the hospital for surgery to open up his clogged arteries, but the hunger strike had damaged his heart and prevented a successful surgery. Saber's wife, Farideh Jamshidi, told the Guardian: "My husband died two days ago, but we were unaware of his death until today when someone in the hospital informed one of our friends." Farideh Jamshidi, Saber's wife, has been loudly demanding that the hospital turn the body of her husband over to her. His corpse has reportedly been taken to the morgue for an autopsy. Eyewitnesses have said that during the six hours between the time he first complained of chest pain early Friday morning and when he was finally taken for medical treatment, Saber was screaming loudly in agony, but prison staff paid no attention to him. According to Melli Mazhabi, the website of the Nationalist-Religious Coalition, Saber's cellmates announced their readiness to testify in any court as to how his condition and cries were ignored.[4] She said Saber stopped eating food and later stopped drinking water in protest at the death of his fellow dissident Haleh Sahabi, She died of a heart attack during scuffles with security forces at the funeral of her father, Ezatollah Sahabi, the leader of the Nationalist-Religious alliance of politicians, on 1 June. Jamshidi accused prison officials of negligence toward her husband, saying she received reports that they delayed transferring him to hospital for six hours. "Doctors told us later that they could have saved his life by taking him to the hospital earlier. We were supposed to visit him in the prison tomorrow and now we have to visit his dead body in the cemetery."Hours after his death his sister, Firouzeh Saber, complained to Radio Farda of three concerns: "First of all, why was he in prison? He had been in prison without having been sentenced. Second, why did a tragedy such as [Sahabi's] death happen, leading [Saber] to go on hunger strike? And third, why were [authorities] so careless that it took them several hours to take him to the hospital" after he complained of chest pains.[5] On 12 June 2011, Reporters Without Borders issued a statement accusing the government of the Islamic Republic of responsibility for the death of Hoda Saber by neglecting his medical needs and by arbitrarily arresting him in the first place.[6] Iran's Fars news agency denied the family's allegations and said Saber had received medical care before his death. It accused the opposition of politicising his death.

Leaders[edit]


Sources[edit]