Nativ College Leadership Program in Israel

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The Nativ College Leadership Program in Israel (נתיב) is a nine-month, post-high-school gap year program for mostly North American Jews. It operates under the auspices of the United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism, and draws its participants mostly from USY and Ramah camps.

About Nativ[edit]

Nativ is based at the Shirley & Jacob Fuchsberg Center for Conservative Judaism, located in Jerusalem at 6 Agron Street. Nativers live at Beit Nativ, the adjoining youth hostel at 8 Agron Street, which is minutes away from Ben Yehuda Street and Emek Refaim.[1]

History[edit]

Nativ was founded in 1981; as of 2012-2013, it is in its 32nd year.[2]

Leadership[edit]

The current director of Nativ is Yossi Garr.[3]

Nativ tracks[edit]

Nativ splits into different tracks for each semester.

First semester (September–January)[edit]

Hebrew University[edit]

Nativers attend the Rothberg International School at Hebrew University in Jerusalem.[4]

Conservative Yeshiva[edit]

Nativers study at the Conservative Yeshiva.[5]

Ulpan/volunteering[edit]

Nativers intensively learn Hebrew through almost daily Ulpan classes, and volunteer as well.[6]

Second semester (February–June)[edit]

Youth Village[edit]

Based on K'far Chassidim.[7]

Kehilla (community service)[edit]

Based in Yeruham, where Nativers offer to serve in the Magen David Adom, comparable to the Red Cross, the other option is to volunteer helping teach English in the school.[8]

Gesher[edit]

Nativ Gesher is a new track, whereby Nativers will have the same first semester options as the Kibbutz and Kehillah Nativers, but during the second semester they will travel to and volunteer in Masorti communities in Europe, chiefly in Berlin and London.[9]

Gesher will likely begin with Nativ 31, in the 2011-2012 year.

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Beit Nativ". Nativ.org. 2010-03-29. Archived from the original on 2010-03-29. Retrieved 2012-08-29. 
  2. ^ "Nativers 29 say". Nativ.org. Archived from the original on 2010-03-04. Retrieved 2012-08-29. 
  3. ^ "Staff". Nativ.org. 2011-09-22. Retrieved 2012-03-03. 
  4. ^ "Hebrew University Option". Nativ.org. 2010-03-10. Archived from the original on 2010-03-10. Retrieved 2012-08-29. 
  5. ^ "Conservative Yeshiva Option". Nativ.org. 2010-03-10. Archived from the original on 2010-03-10. Retrieved 2012-08-29. 
  6. ^ "Ulpan and Community Service Option". Nativ.org. 2010-03-10. Archived from the original on 2010-03-10. Retrieved 2012-08-29. 
  7. ^ "Kibbutz Option". Nativ.org. 2010-03-29. Archived from the original on 2010-03-29. Retrieved 2012-08-29. 
  8. ^ "Community Service Option". Nativ.org. 2010-03-29. Archived from the original on 2010-03-29. Retrieved 2012-08-29. 
  9. ^ "Nativ Gesher". Nativ.org. 2010-03-29. Archived from the original on 2010-03-29. Retrieved 2012-08-29. 
  10. ^ "Story of a Jewish-American hero - Israel Culture, Ynetnews". Ynetnews.com. Retrieved 2012-03-03. 

External links[edit]