Natural order (philosophy)

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In philosophy, the natural order is the moral source from which natural law seeks to derive its authority. It encompasses the natural relations of beings to one another, in the absence of law, which natural law attempts to reinforce.

In contrast, divine law seeks authority from God, and positive law seeks authority from government.

The term is used by Hans-Hermann Hoppe in his book Democracy: The God That Failed: The Economics and Politics of Monarchy, Democracy, and Natural Order to defend anarcho-capitalism.

The term is used by Friedrich Hayek in his writings.

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