Naworth Castle

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Naworth Castle
Brampton, Cumbria, England
Naworth Castle air 1.jpg
Aerial photograph of Naworth Castle
Naworth Castle is located in Cumbria
Naworth Castle
Naworth Castle
Coordinates grid reference NY559625
Site history
Materials Stone

Naworth Castle, also known as, or recorded in historical documents as "Naward", is a castle in Cumbria, England, near the town of Brampton. It is adjacent to the A69 about two miles east of Brampton. It is on the opposite side of the River Irthing to, and just within sight of, Lanercost Priory. It was the seat of the Barons Dacre and their cognatic descendants, the Earls of Carlisle, and is currently occupied by Philip Howard, brother and heir presumptive of the 13th Earl of Carlisle. It is a grade I listed building. [1]

History[edit]

The castle is thought to have late 13th-century origins, in the form of a square keep and bailey. It was first mentioned in 1323, and in 1335 a licence to crenellate was granted to Ralph Dacre. Residential quarters were added in the early 16th century by Thomas, Lord Dacre, and there were further additions in 1602, for his successor Lord William Howard. It is likely that an 18th-century walled garden lies within the boundaries of the original moat.

Howard purchased back the Dacre family estate from King James and took up residence with his children and grandchildren at Naworth Castle. He restored the castle, improved the estate and established order in that part of the country. He had a large family of children, of whom Philip, his heir, was the grandfather of Charles Howard, 1st Earl of Carlisle, and his younger son Francis was the ancestor of the Howards of Corby.

William Morris, the artist and socialist, stayed at the castle in August 1874. In a letter to Aglaia Coronio he writes "...all is very pleasant. Ned & I pass our mornings in a most delightful room in one of the towers that has not been touched since William Howard of Queen Elizabeth's time lived there: the whole place is certainly the most poetical in England."[2]

From 1939 to 1940 Naworth was occupied by Rossall School, which had been evacuated from its own buildings by various government departments.

Miscellanea[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Name: NAWORTH CASTLE List entry Number: 1087643". English Heritage. Retrieved 23 July 2014. 
  2. ^ P. Henderson, ed., The Letters of William Morris to His Family and Friends (London: Longmans, 1950)
  3. ^ Life of Francis Galton by Karl Pearson Vol 2, p. 393

External links[edit]