Nebraska State Patrol

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Nebraska State Patrol
Abbreviation NSP
Nebraska State Patrol.jpg
Patch of the Nebraska State Patrol.
Motto Pro Bono Publico
"for the good of the public"
Agency overview
Formed 1937
Employees 729 (as of 2006) [1]
Legal personality Governmental: Government agency
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdiction* State of Nebraska, U.S.
NE - State Patrol Troops.png
Nebraska State Patrol Troops
Size 77,421 square miles (200,520 km2)
Population 1,774,571 (2007 est.)[2]
General nature
Operational structure
Headquarters Lincoln, Nebraska
Troopers 529 (as of 2007) [3]
Civilians 219 (as of 2007) [4]
Agency executive Colonel David Sankey, Superintendent
Troops 6
Website
http://www.statepatrol.nebraska.gov
Footnotes
* Divisional agency: Division of the country, over which the agency has usual operational jurisdiction.

The Nebraska State Patrol is Nebraska's only statewide full-service law enforcement agency. Serving Nebraska since 1937, State Patrol troopers perform a wide variety of duties. Those include working with communities to improve public safety, enforcing traffic laws and drug laws, investigating crimes, and enforcing the laws and regulations pertaining to motor carriers.

The current NSP commander is Colonel David Sankey.

NSP is divided into six districts including:

Divisions[edit]

NSP has several divisions which operate within the department, they include:[5]

  • The Aviation Support Division which consists of a Bell 407 helicopter, three Turbo Cessna T206H's equipped with FLIR and downlink capabilities, and a Piper Super Cub used for traffic enforcement, observation and surveillance. The Aviation Support Division is used for many different functions including: Drug raids, presidential security, rescue missions, investigative photography, transportation, surveillance, and traffic enforcement.
  • The State Capitol Security Division is responsible for the daily security needs of the "Capitol Complex Area". The State Capitol is equipped with over 60 cameras that are recorded using a "Digital Video Recorder" which allows them to store video images and print out still images.
  • The Carrier Enforcement division operates permanent truck scales throughout the state, conducts carrier inspections and is in charge of monitoring commercial motor vehicle accidents.
  • Communications - Statewide, 50 Communications Specialists staff the six communications centers located in Omaha, Lincoln, Norfolk, Grand Island, North Platte and Scottsbluff.
  • Community Policing
  • Executive Protection
  • Internal Affairs
  • Investigative Services
  • The K-9 Division consists of 15 troopers and their police service dogs. Each dog costs about $3,500-$5,000. The division relies heavily on public support. The dogs are purchased by the Nebraska State Patrol Foundation using donations from the public.
  • Legal
  • Supply and Radio Engineering
  • The Traffic Enforcement division makes up about 200 troopers which are responsible for over 10,000 miles (16,000 km) of roads in Nebraska.
  • The Training Academy conducts both the Basic Recruit Camp and in service training.

Training academy[edit]

NSP runs their own 24 week in-resident training academy in lieu of sending recruits through the standard Nebraska Law Enforcement Training Center's 13 week course.

The new Nebraska State Patrol Training Academy is co-located with the Nebraska Law Enforcement Training Center in Grand Island, Nebraska. The collocation of agencies upgraded the facilities for virtually every officer completing law enforcement certification in the State of Nebraska. The Training Academy includes: barracks to house up to 208 officers, state-of-the-art classrooms, a defensive tactics room, a fitness room, a training tank, a gymnasium, a recreation area, 2 ranges (1 static shooting, 1 combat), an inspection bay and training room for commercial vehicle inspections, a police service dog training grounds/boarding area, a driving range, and a cafeteria.

The State Patrol's style of instruction balances a para-military environment with an academic environment. The curriculum includes instruction in officer survival, investigations, patrolling, legal, administrative, tactical, human understanding, traffic (motor vehicle laws), and carrier enforcement.

The Training Academy staff is well-versed in educational theories such as state-to-state training and adult learning guidelines. The recruits undergo nearly one thousand hours of instruction during camp. The challenge is to ensure they are absorbing and retaining the information. In accordance with the adult learning theory, classes run into the evening rather than starting too early in the morning and much of the instruction involves hands-on and scenario-based training. State-to-state training means the staff tries to present the instruction in the same conditions and environments the recruits will actually experience on the street.[6]

The Nebraska State Patrol rejects for training all who have visible tattoos, even those announcing pride in the recruit's former military service.[7]

Fallen officers[edit]

Since the creation of the Nebraska State Patrol, 11 officers have died in the line of duty.[8]

Officer Date of Death Details
Trooper Loyal M. Zink
June 13, 1945
Automobile accident while pursuing a suspect
Trooper John T. Meistrell
April 10, 1953
Automobile accident on icy roads
Trooper Vernon C. Rolfs
May 30, 1953
Gunfire after stopping a speeding motorist
Trooper Marvin L. Hansen
April 8, 1954
Gunfire after stopping the driver of a stolen car
Trooper Duane F. Nichols
July 24, 1958,
Automobile accident involving a drunk driver
Trooper Raymond M. Koerber
September 18, 1961
Automobile accident
Trooper George William Amos, Jr.
April 20, 1973
Gunfire after stopping a fugitive
Trooper Michael D. Farber
August 24, 1980
Struck by a car being pursued by fellow officers
Trooper Robert J. Chab
January 6, 1984
Struck by a car while performing vehicle checks
Trooper Donald Matejka
December 27, 1989
Cardiac arrest while subduing a suspect
Trooper Mark Paul Wagner
March 4, 1999
Accidental gunshot wound during training

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ USDOJ Statistics
  2. ^ 2007 Population Estimates
  3. ^ USDOJ Statistics
  4. ^ USDOJ Statistics
  5. ^ Nebraska State Patrol
  6. ^ Nebraska State Patrol
  7. ^ Nelson, Robert. "Nelson: Tattoo not always stain on quality of law officers." The Omaha World Herald, 30 December 2011.
  8. ^ Nebraska State Patrol web page

External links[edit]