NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies
Predecessor Netherlands Institute for War Documentation
Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies
Formation 1945
Headquarters Amsterdam
Location
Website www.niod.nl

The NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies (Dutch: NIOD Instituut voor Oorlogs-, Holocaust- en Genocidestudies) is an organisation in the Netherlands which maintains archives and carries out historical studies into the Second World War. The institute was founded as a merge of the Netherlands Institute for War Documentation (Nederlands instituut voor oorlogsdocumentatie, NIOD, formerly Rijksinstituut voor oorlogsdocumentatie, RIOD) and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies (CHGS).[1]

It has been part of the Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen (Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences) since January 1, 1999.[1]

The institute published Het Koninkrijk der Nederlanden in de Tweede Wereldoorlog (The Kingdom of the Netherlands During World War II) in fourteen volumes and 18,000 pages. The magnum opus of Loe de Jong is the standard reference on the history of the Netherlands during World War II. The NIOD had recently made an electronic edition of the entire work, available for downloading from 11 December 2011, licensed under creative commons CC BY 3.0.[2]

It also performed a study into the Srebrenica massacre of 1995, which led to the report Srebrenica: a ‘safe’ area, which led to the resignation of the second cabinet of Wim Kok.

Dutch Institute for War Documentation at Herengracht 380 in Amsterdam. Name plate at the entrance of the Dutch Institute for War Documentation. Study room of the Dutch Institute for War Documentation.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "A short history of the NIOD". NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies. Retrieved 25 July 2012. 
  2. ^ Loe de Jong (1969–1991). "The Kingdom of the Netherlands During World War II" (in Dutch). NIOD. Retrieved 21 December 2011. 

External links[edit]