Neighborhoods in Seattle

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Seattle, Washington contains many districts and neighborhoods. Former Seattle mayor Greg Nickels has called Seattle "a city of neighborhoods".[1][2][3] Early European settlers established widely scattered settlements on the surrounding hills, which grew into neighborhoods and autonomous towns. Conurbations tended to grow from such towns or from unincorporated areas around trolley stops from the 19th century and early 20th century. Consequently, Seattle has suffered from transportation and street-naming problems.[4]

Defining Seattle's neighborhoods[edit]

This 1909 map of Seattle shows many neighborhood names that continue in common use today—for example, Ballard, Fremont, Queen Anne Hill, Capitol Hill, West Seattle, and Beacon Hill—but also many that have fallen out of use—for example, "Ross" and "Edgewater" on either side of Fremont, "Brooklyn" for today's University District, and "Renton Hill" near the confluence of Capitol Hill, First Hill, and the Central District.

Because Seattle was established during an economic boom fueled by the timber industry[5] (see Seattle#Timber town), the city's early years were characterized by hasty expansion and development, under which residential areas were loosely defined by widely scattered plats. This arrangement was further solidified by the establishment of locally-initiated community clubs, public libraries, public schools, and public parks, which created a sense of community and civic participation.[citation needed]

At the beginning of the 20th century, Seattle’s community clubs became influential in the organization of public improvements. These had a significant effect upon the character of their neighborhoods and allowed them to remain distinct from the surrounding areas.[6][7] Some community clubs used covenants to restrict the ethnicity of residents.[8] (See section Covenants and racial restrictions, below.)

Establishing public library branches can define districts as well as neighborhoods. Public libraries are among the most heavily used buildings.[9] Seattle has elected its city council at large since 1910, and community clubs lobby councilors for the interests of local residents – such as for a library branch. The community organizations build a voting constituency, and in so doing define a neighborhood. In the absence of ward politics, this and campaign finance legislation are seen as more open alternatives. The Greenwood-Phinney Commercial Club was particularly active in organizing toward the Greenwood branch that opened in 1928.[10] The Lake City Branch Library opened in 1935 as a few shelves of books in part of a room in Lake City School, shared with the Works Progress Administration (WPA), sponsored by the Pacific Improvement Club community group. The library moved into a new building in 1955.[11]

Elementary public schools effectively defined many neighborhoods, which are often synonymous with the name of the elementary school when the neighborhood and school were established. Many of the neighborhoods contain a few smaller neighborhoods. Mann and Minor neighborhoods in the Central District, were built around their schools. The University Heights school (1903) in the north of the University District was named for the neighborhood, as was the Latona School (1906) in Wallingford.[12][13][14]

Parks similarly define some neighborhoods. Madrona Beach and Cowen and Ravenna Parks were privately established to encourage residential development upon otherwise unusable land.[15] The plan for Olmsted Parks fulfilled its goal and significantly influenced the character of neighborhoods around parks and playgrounds.[16] East Phinney and West Meridian neighborhoods are sometimes called Woodland Park, as well as South Green Lake or North Wallingford for Meridian.[17]

Covenants and racial restrictions[edit]

Housing covenants became common in the 1920s and were validated by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1926. Minorities were effectively limited to the International District and parts of some neighborhoods in south-east Seattle for Asian- and Native Americans; or the Central District for Blacks, clearly defining those neighborhoods.[18] Ballard – Sunset Hill, Beacon Hill, Broadmoor, Green Lake, Laurelhurst, Magnolia, Queen Anne, South Lake City, and other Seattle neighborhoods and blocks had racially or ethnically restrictive housing covenants, such as the following sample:

No person or persons of [any of several minorities] blood, lineage, or extraction shall be permitted to occupy a portion of said property ... except a domestic servant or servants who may actually and in good faith be employed by white occupants.[19]

Further restrictions on conveyance (rental, lease, sale, transfer) were often included, effectively defining most of the neighborhoods in Seattle during the first decades after establishment.

The Supreme Court ruled in 1948 that racial restrictions would no longer be enforced. The Seattle Open Housing Ordinance became effective in 1968. Although unenforceable, legal complications prevent the covenants from being expunged from property title documents.[19][20]

Wards and Little City Halls[edit]

Seattle initially adopted a ward system, however in 1910, this system was replaced by non-partisan, at-large representation. Variations on ward systems were proposed and rejected in 1914,[21] 1926,[22] 1974, 1995,[23] and 2003[24] and convictions for campaign-related money laundering followed the 1995 campaign.[25] Critics claimed that district-style elections of the city council would result in Tammany Hall-style politics. In 1973, inspired by Boston's model, Mayor Wes Uhlman's administration implemented a system of Little City Halls, where Community Service Centers (CSCs) assumed responsibility for coordinating municipal services. Uhlman's political opponents called the CSCs a thinly disguised ward system designed to promote Uhlman's reelection.[26] CSCs became a setting for political arguments between the city council and the mayor; controversies over accountability, cronyism, and ward politics occurred in 1974, 1976, and 1988. In 1991 the CSCs were renamed Neighborhood Service Centers (NSCs) and were placed under the jurisdiction of the Department of Neighborhoods.[26] More recently, their number has been reduced. As of 2011, there are NSCs located in Ballard, Lake City, the University District, the Central District, West Seattle, Southeast Seattle, and Delridge.[27]

Local Improvement Districts[edit]

A Local Improvement District (LID) is a method by which a group of property owners can share the cost of transportation infrastructure improvements. This involves improving the street, building sidewalks and installing stormwater management systems. Without Seattle's LID assessment system, the city would be unable to maintain its rapid growth in population and territory.[28] LIDs have helped define neighborhoods by localizing decisions about issues like sidewalks, vegetation and other features of the public space, permitting neighborhoods to remain distinct from their neighbors.[citation needed]

Transportation[edit]

Minor arterial roads are generally located along the boundaries of neighborhoods, with streets and highways built according to the street classification system.[29] These effectively help define neighborhoods.[30]

Development in accordance with the street classification system maintains the quality of life of city neighborhoods and improves efficiency of the road system. The classification system discourages rat running through local neighborhood streets.[31]

Transportation hubs, such as business zones and transit stations, such as Park and Ride facilities, provide focal points for districts of neighborhoods the same way trolley stops defined neighborhoods before cars.[citation needed]

Informal districts[edit]

University District Neighborhood Service Center (storefront at right)

No official neighborhood boundaries have existed in Seattle since 1910.[21][32] Districts and neighborhoods are thus informal;[33] their boundaries may overlap and multiple names may exist for a single district. Boundaries and names can be disputed or change over time. In 2002 a Department of Neighborhoods spokeswoman said, "I've seen my area go from the 'CD' to 'Madrona' to 'Greater Madison Valley' and now 'Madrona Park.' "[3] Some neighborhoods, such as northwest Seattle, do not have widely-recognized names for their greater districts.[citation needed]

Throughout Seattle one can find signs indicating the boundaries of neighborhoods; the locations of these signs have been specified by the city's many community councils. However, the boundaries suggested by these signs routinely overlap and differ from delineations on maps. For example, signs indicate that Lake City Way NE is the southeastern boundary of the Maple Leaf neighborhood,[34][35] while the city clerk's archival map places that district's southern boundary at 85th Street.[36]

Another example of boundary ambiguity is "Frelard," which local residents call the area shared by Fremont and Ballard between 3rd and 8th Avenues NW. Signs facing opposite directions on NW Leary Way reveal the overlap.[12]

Further difficulty in defining neighborhoods can result from residents' identification with neighborhoods different from those marked on signs and maps. After an acrimonious development dispute in 1966, a group of concerned Wallingford citizens enlisted the University of Washington Community Development Bureau to survey their neighborhood; the survey revealed that more residents of southwest Wallingford considered themselves citizens of Fremont than of Wallingford.[12][13]

List of districts and neighborhoods[edit]

Despite complications in Seattle's system of neighborhoods and districts, the names and boundaries in the following list are generally accepted and widely used.[37] They are based on the Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Map Atlas,[38] which in turn is based on a variety of sources, including a 1980 neighborhood map produced by the now-defunct Department of Community Development,[39] Seattle Public Library indexes, a 1984-1986 "Neighborhood Profiles" feature series in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer,[40] numerous park, land use and transportation planning studies, as well as records in the Seattle Municipal Archives.

The following table is largely based on maps from the Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas, but also includes designations from other sources.

Neighborhood name Within larger district Annexed[41] Locator map Map Image Geocoordinates / Sources / Notes
1 North Seattle Seattle Various
 
 
Building II on UW campus.jpg
North of the Lake Washington Ship Canal[42]
2 Broadview North Seattle[42] 1954[43]
Seattle Map - Broadview.png
Seattle Broadview Map.jpg
 
BroadviewView.JPG
[44]
3 Bitter Lake North Seattle[42] 1954[43]
Seattle Map - Bitter Lake.png
Seattle Bitter Lake map.jpg
 
[45]
4 North Beach / Blue Ridge North Seattle[42] 1940,[43] 1954[43]
 
Seattle North Beach - Blue Ridge map.jpg
 
[46]
5 Crown Hill North Seattle[42] 1907,[47] 1952,[43] 1954[43]
 
Seattle - Crown Hill map.jpg
 
[48]
6 Greenwood North Seattle[42] 1891,[43] 1954[43]
Seattle Map - Greenwood.png
Seattle - Greenwood map.jpg
Diva Espresso 05.jpg
[49]
7 Northgate North Seattle[42] various 1891-1954[43]
Seattle Map - Northgate.png
Seattle - Northgate map.jpg
Seattle - Northgate branch library 01.jpg
[50]
8 Haller Lake Northgate[50] 1954[43]
 
Seattle - Haller Lake map.jpg
 
[51]
9 Pinehurst Northgate[50] 1953[43]
 
Seattle - Pinehurst map.jpg
 
[52]
10 North College Park

(Licton Springs)

Northgate[50] 1950, 1954[43]
Seattle Map - Licton Springs.png
Seattle - North College Park map.jpg
[53]
11 Maple Leaf Northgate[50] 1891, 1907, 1941, 1945, 1949[43]
 
Seattle - Maple Leaf map.jpg
 
[54]
12 Lake City North Seattle[42] 1953, 1954[43]
Seattle Map - Lake City.png
Seattle - Lake City map.jpg
Seattle - Lake City - former Seafirst 01.jpg
[55] Before annexation to Seattle, Lake City was a township for 5 years.[citation needed] Lake City neighborhoods are now also known as Sand Point-Magnuson Park and neighborhoods northwest of Sand Point.[citation needed]
13 Cedar Park Lake City[55] 1954[43]
 
Seattle - Cedar Park map.jpg
 
[56]
14 Matthews Beach Lake City[55] 1953[43]
Seattle Map - Matthews Beach.png
Seattle - Matthews Beach map.jpg
 
[57]
15 Meadowbrook Lake City[55] 1953[43]
 
Seattle - Meadowbrook map.jpg
Seattle - Meadowbrook Pond 01.jpg
[58]
16 Olympic Hills Lake City[55] 1954[43]
 
Seattle - Olympic Hills map.jpg
 
[59]
17 Victory Heights Lake City[55] 1953, 1954[43]
 
Seattle - Victory Heights map.jpg
 
[60]
18 Wedgwood North Seattle[42] 1945[43]
Seattle Map - Wedgwood.png
Seattle - Wedgwood map.jpg
Seattle - Fiddler's Inn sign.jpg
[61]
19 View Ridge North Seattle[42] 1942, 1953[43]
 
Seattle - View Ridge map.jpg
 
[62]
20 Sand Point North Seattle[42] 1910?, 1942?; 1953[43]
Seattle Map - Sand Point.png
Seattle - Sand Point map.jpg
Climbing wall at Sand Point, Seattle.jpg
[63]
21 Roosevelt North Seattle[42] 1891[43]
Seattle Map - Roosevelt.png
Seattle - Roosevelt map.jpg
Seattle - former Hollywood Theater 01.jpg
[64]
22 Ravenna North Seattle[42] 1907, 1910, 1941, 1943, 1945[43]
Seattle Map - Ravenna.png
Seattle - Ravenna map.jpg
 
[65] The 1907 annexation was the former town of Ravenna.
23 Bryant North Seattle[42] 1891[43]
Seattle Map - Bryant.png
Seattle - Bryant map.jpg
 
[66]
24 Windermere North Seattle[42] 1910[43]
Seattle Map - Windermere.png
Seattle - Windermere map.jpg
 
[67]
25 Hawthorne Hills Windermere[42] / North Seattle 1910[43]
 
Of the area the Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas designates as "Windermere", many consider the area west of Sand Point Way to be a separate neighborhood, Hawthorne Hills.
26 Laurelhurst North Seattle[42] 1910[43]
Seattle Map - Laurelhurst.png
Seattle - Laurelhurst map.jpg
Laurelhurst Battelle campus 06.jpg
[68]
27 University District ("U. District") North Seattle[42] 1891[43]
Seattle Map - University District.png
Seattle - University District map.jpg
Seattle - 4500 Univ Way 01.jpg
[69] Known in the 1890s and 1900s as Brooklyn.[70] The main campus of the University of Washington is itself divided into the main (central) campus, plus the large South Campus (south of NE Pacific Street) and East Campus (east of Montlake Boulevard NE), and a smaller North Campus (north of NE 45th Street) and miscellaneous buildings west of 15th Avenue NE that are collectively known as West Campus.[71][72] Beyond the university, the district has a shopping district almost universally known as "The Ave" and older neighborhoods such as University Heights and University Park that are nowadays rarely distinguished from the U. District as such.[73]
28 University Village Ravenna[42] / University District 1891, 1907, 1910[43]
Seattle Map - University Village.png
 
 
Primarily, the name 'University Village' refers to a shopping center at a corner of what the City Clerk considers part of Ravenna,[65] but it is also commonly used for the surrounding neighborhood on all sides, which ranges into what the City Clerk's maps consider Ravenna to the north and west and the east portion of the University District to the west. (To the south is the East Campus of the University of Washington.)
29 Wallingford North Seattle[42] 1891[43]
Seattle Map - Wallingford.png
Seattle - Wallingford map.jpg
Seattle - Good Shepherd 01.jpg
[74] Includes historic Latona and usually Tangletown/Meridian (the latter is sometimes considered part of Green Lake)[12][13]
30 Northlake Lake Union / Lower Wallingford, spilling over into Fremont and the University District. 1891[43]
Gas Works Park 23.jpg
 
31 Green Lake North Seattle[42] 1891[43]
Seattle Map - Green Lake.png
Seattle - Green Lake map.jpg
Seattle - 6652 Green Lake Way N 02.jpg
[75] Some people consider Meridian / Tangletown to be part of the Green Lake neighborhood.[12][13]
32 Fremont North Seattle[42] 1891[43]
Seattle Map - Fremont.png
Seattle - Fremont map.jpg
Solstice Parade 1992 Aurora Bridge.jpg
[76]
33 Phinney Ridge North Seattle[42] 1891[43]
Seattle Map - Phinney Ridge.png
Seattle - Phinney Ridge map.jpg
Phinney Farmers Market 01.jpg
[77]
34 Ballard North Seattle[42] 1907[43]
Seattle Map - Ballard.png
Seattle - Ballard map.jpg
Ballard Ave - G.S. Sanborn Building.jpg
[78] Prior to annexation by Seattle, Ballard was a town for 17 years. There is an area south of Ballard and west of Fremont often referred to as Frelard and claimed by both.
35 West Woodland Ballard[78] 1907[43]
 
Seattle - West Woodland map.jpg
 
[79]
36 Whittier Heights Ballard[78] 1907[43]
 
Seattle - Whittier Heights map.jpg
 
[80]
37 Adams Ballard[78] 1907[43]
 
Seattle - Adams map.jpg
Ballard Commons skater 1-03.jpg
[81]
38 Sunset Hill Ballard[78] 1907[43]
 
Seattle - Sunset Hill map.jpg
Golden Gardens 02.jpg
[82]
39 Loyal Heights Ballard[78] 1907[43]
 
Seattle - Loyal Heights map.jpg
Seattle - Loyal Heights businesses on NW 80th.jpg
[83]
40 Central Seattle Seattle Various
 
 
Seattle spm.jpeg
Including everything south of the Lake Washington Ship Canal and north of Yesler Way, and some things a bit further south.[42]
41 Magnolia Central Seattle[42] 1891[43]
Seattle Map - Magnolia.png
Seattle - Magnolia map.jpg
Seattle - Discovery Park 08.jpg
[84]
42 Lawton Park Magnolia[84] 1891[43]
 
Seattle - Lawton Park map.jpg
Fort Lawton West Point Lighthouse 03.jpg
[85]
43 Briarcliff Magnolia[84] 1891[43]
 
Seattle - Briarcliff map.jpg
 
[86]
44 Southeast Magnolia Magnolia[84] 1891[43]
 
Seattle - Southeast Magnolia map.jpg
 
[87]
45 Interbay Central Seattle[42] 1891[43]
Seattle Map - Interbay.png
Seattle - Interbay map.jpg
Seattle - 1430-1436 Elliott 01.jpg
[88]
46 Queen Anne Central Seattle[42] [1869], 1883, 1891[43]
Seattle Map - Queen Anne.png
Seattle - Queen Anne map.jpg
Seattle - 619 W Comstock 05.jpg
[89] Part of Lower Queen Anne was original 1869 Seattle; the area south of McGraw Street was annexed 1883, and the rest 1891.[43]
47 North Queen Anne Queen Anne[89] 1891[43]
 
Seattle - North Queen Anne map.jpg
Seattle - N. Queen Anne Dr. Bridge 02.jpg
[90]
48 East Queen Anne Queen Anne[89] 1883, 1891[43]
 
Seattle - East Queen Anne map.jpg
Amplius Eo 01.jpg
[91] Annexed 1883 to McGraw Street, 1891 beyond[43]
49 Lower Queen Anne Queen Anne[89] [1869], 1883[43]
Seattle Map - Lower Queen Anne.png
Seattle - Lower Queen Anne map.jpg
InternationalFountainSpaceNeedle.jpg
[92] Also known as 'Uptown'.[citation needed]
50 West Queen Anne Queen Anne[89] 1883, 1891[43]
 
Seattle - West Queen Anne map.jpg
Seattle - West Queen Anne Walls 07.jpg
[93]
51 Capitol Hill Central Seattle[42] [1869], 1883, 1891[43]
Seattle Map - Capitol Hill.png
Seattle - Capitol Hill map.jpg
Seattle-St-Marks-slope-3482.jpg
[94] 1869: Broadway District was part of "original Seattle"
52 Portage Bay[95] / Roanoke Capitol Hill[94] 1883, 1891[43]
 
Seattle - Portage Bay map.jpg
Seattle - St. Patrick's parish house 01.jpg
[95] Annexed 1883 to E Lynn St, 1891 for the remainder.[43] Includes the Roanoke Park Historic District.
53 Broadway Capitol Hill[94] [1869][43]
 
Seattle - Broadway map.jpg
Seattle Community College Broadway Performance Hall.JPG
[96] The Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas map of the Broadway District shown here extends farther to the east and west than most present-day Seattleites would call Broadway. It appears to correspond roughly the portion of Capitol Hill that falls within the original 1869 city limits, and which was known as Broadway before the name Capitol Hill was introduced.
54 Pike-Pine Corridor / Pike/Pine[97][98][99] Capitol Hill / Broadway[94] [1869][43]
 
 
Seattle Chapel 02.jpg
The Pike-Pine Corridor, running east-west through what the Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas considers the "Broadway" District, has gained a strong identity in the early 21st century.
55 Montlake Capitol Hill[94] / Central Seattle 1891,[43] 1950, 1952, 1953 (?)[100]
Seattle Map - Montlake.png
Seattle - Montlake map.jpg
Seattle St D 05.jpg
[101] The Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas classifies Montlake as part of Capitol Hill, but a valley along Boyer Avenue separates it from the hill.
56 Stevens Capitol Hill[94]
 
Seattle - Stevens map.jpg
Seattle - Stevens School 02.jpg
[102] The name "Stevens" doesn't have much currency for most of this area except for the immediate vicinity of the Stevens School at 19th Avenue E and E Galer Street. The small neighborhood just north of that is often called Interlaken, after Interlaken Park; the area centered around 19th Avenue and E Madison Street was known in the early 20th century as Renton Hill, but that name has largely passed out of use.
57 Interlaken Capitol Hill / Stevens[94]
 
 
Interlaken-Park-snow-2897.jpg
Consisting largely of Interlaken Park and Louisa Boren Park, the neighborhood between Capitol Hill proper and Montlake also contains a small number of private homes and the Seattle Hebrew Academy.
58 Madison Valley Capitol Hill / Stevens[94] / Central Seattle 1883, 1891[43]
 
 
Lucexterior.jpg
Annexed 1883 south of E Galer Street, 1891 for the remainder [43]
59 Renton Hill Capitol Hill / Stevens[94]
 
 
Seattle - 1729 17th E 03.jpg
Although the name has largely fallen out of use, the Renton Hill Community Improvement Club, founded June 18, 1901, was Seattle's first community club.[7]
60 Madison Park Capitol Hill[94] / Central Seattle 1883, 1891[43]
Seattle Map - Madison Park.png
Seattle - Madison Park map.jpg
Seattle - 1117 36th E 02.jpg
[103] Annexed 1883 south of E Galer St; the remainder in 1891.[43] The Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas classifies Madison Park as part of Capitol Hill, but a valley through the Washington Park Arboretum separates it from Capitol Hill proper.
61 Broadmoor Madison Park 1883, 1891[43]
Seattle Map - Broadmoor.png
 
Seattle - Broadmoor 01A.jpg
Annexed 1883 south of the line of E Galer St; the remainder in 1891.[43] A gated community within Madison Park.
62 Lake Union North Seattle / Central Seattle
 
Seattle - Cascade map.jpg
Kayak on Lake Union 01.jpg
The City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas uses the term "Cascade" to refer to much of the area around Lake Union (see map here), but that use is not at all common.
63 South Lake Union, Seattle Lake Union 1883[43]
Seattle Map - South Lake Union.png
Seattle - South Lake Union map.jpg
Seattle - Center for Wooden Boats, Wawona, and Northwest Seaport 01.jpg
The City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas uses the term "Cascade" to refer to much of the area around Lake Union (see image here), but that use is not at all common.
64 Cascade, Seattle South Lake Union 1883[43]
Seattle Map - Cascade.png
 
Russian Orthodox Church in Seattle.jpg
Cascade, south and east of Lake Union originally extended west to Terry Avenue (though it is now generally considered to end at Fairview,[citation needed] south to Denny Hill (now the Denny Regrade) east to Melrose Avenue E (from which it is through the area now cut off by Interstate 5.[104]
65 Westlake Lake Union 1883[43]
 
Seattle - Westlake map.jpg
[105]
66 Eastlake Lake Union 1883, 1891[43]
Seattle Map - Eastlake.png
Seattle - Eastlake map.jpg
Seattle - Seward School from Aurora Bridge 01.jpg
[106]
67 Downtown Central Seattle [1869][43]
 
 
Looking south from Seattle Central Library 01.jpg
[107]
68 Denny Regrade Downtown[107] [1869][43]
Seattle Map - Denny Regrade.png
Seattle - Denny Regrade map.jpg
Seattle - El Rio entrance - 01.jpg
[108]
69 Belltown Downtown[107] [1869][43]
Seattle Map - Belltown.png
Seattle - Belltown map.jpg
Seattle Austin Bell Bldg 02.jpg
[109]

Belltown currently is largely residential with some commercial office buildings, with 1st street containing a large concentration of nightlife dining and drinking establishments. The intersection of 2nd ave and Virginia is the highest point in the Downtown neighbourhood area.

70 Pike-Market Downtown[107] [1869][43]
 
Seattle Pike-Market map.JPG
Pike Place Market Center Sign.jpg
[110][111]
71 Central Business District Downtown[107] [1869][43]
 
Seattle - Central Business District map.jpg
Seattle - Exchange Building 03.jpg
[112]
72 First Hill Downtown[107] [1869][43]
 
Seattle - First Hill map.jpg
Seattle - Stacy Mansion 01.jpg
[113] Widely known as "Pill Hill" for its many hospitals, this neighborhood immediately east of Downtown was once the city's most desirable residential area.
73 Pioneer Square Downtown[107] [1869][43]
 
Seattle - Pioneer Square map.jpg
Seattle - Pioneer Square Park from Post Alley 01A.jpg
[114] The original center of Seattle, the southwest part of present-day Downtown. Probable origin of the term "Skid Road" for a neighborhood. Includes the Pioneer Square-Skid Road Historic District. Pioneer Square as defined by the City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas also includes the tide lands platted 1895, filled 1902, that are now the site of two professional sports stadiums.
74 International District ("ID") Downtown[107] [1869][43]
 
Seattle - International District map.jpg
Seattle - Chinese New Year 2011 - 11.jpg
[115] Includes former tide lands platted 1895, filled 1902.[43] Southeast Downtown. Sometimes referred to as "Chinatown", the neighborhood also includes Little Saigon east of Interstate 5, and remnants of the historic Japantown, especially around 6th Avenue and Main Street.
75 Yesler Terrace Downtown[107] [1869][43]
 
Seattle - Yesler Terrace map.jpg
Seattle Yesler Terrace 05.jpg
[116] Housing project east of Interstate 5; originally, it extended further west into present-day Kobe Terrace Park.
76 Central Waterfront Downtown[107] [1869][43]
 
Seattle - Central Waterfront map.jpg
Seattle - Pier 55 from water 01.jpg
[117]
77 West Edge[118][119] Downtown [1869][43]
 
 
Seattle Hull Bldg.jpg
The downtown area of both the Central Business District and Belltown from roughly halfway between First and Second Avenues to Alaskan Way (but not including the piers themselves) is sometimes called the Seattle's "West Edge".
78 Central Area[120] / Central District ("CD") Central Seattle [1869], 1883[43]
Seattle Map - Central District.png
Seattle - Central Area map.jpg
Seattle - Immaculate Conception 05.jpg
[120]
79 Mann Central Area[120] [1869][43]
 
Seattle - Mann map.jpg
JamesAGarfield HS 2.jpg
[121] The name Mann for this area around Garfield High School does not have much currency. It comes from the old Horace Mann School, later Nova, just north of Garfield.
80 Minor Central Area[120] [1869][43]
 
Seattle - Minor map.jpg
Seattle U Fountain 02.jpg
[122] The name Minor for this area does not have much currency. It comes from the T.T. Minor School.
81 Cherry Hill & Squire Park Minor [1869], 1905, 1921[43]
 
 
Seattle Providence 01.jpg
Portions are part of original Seattle; Squire Park was annexed in 1905, and a remaining enclave in 1921.[43]
82 Atlantic Central Area[120] [1869], 1883[43]
 
Seattle - Atlantic map.jpg
Seattle - NAAM 02.jpg
[123] The northern portion of this area was part of original 1869 Seattle; south of Atlantic Street was annexed 1883[43]
83 Judkins Park Atlantic [1869][43]
 
 
27 Oct 2007 Seattle Demo 01.jpg
[124][125]
84 Madrona Central Area[120] [1869], 1883[43]
Seattle Map - Madrona.png
Seattle - Madrona map.jpg
Seattle - 1630 36th Avenue 02.jpg
[126] South of E Howell Street was original 1869 Seattle; the remainder was annexed 1883.[43]
85 Madrona Valley Madrona [1869][43]
 
 
 
 
86 Harrison[120] / Denny-Blaine[120] Central Area[120] 1883[43]
Seattle Map - Denny-Blaine.png
Seattle - Denny-Blaine map.jpg
Denny Blaine Lake Park 02.jpg
[127]
87 Washington Park Harrison/Denny-Blaine 1883[43]
Seattle Map - Washington Park.png
Seattle - 1117 36th E 02.jpg
88 Leschi[120] Central Area[120] [1869][43]
Seattle Map - Leschi.png
Seattle - Leschi map.jpg
Leschi Park trolley bridge 01.jpg
[128]
89 South End Seattle various[43]
 
 
Kubota Garden 15.jpg
[42]
90 Rainier Valley South End [1869], 1883, 1907[43]
Seattle Map - Rainier Valley.png
Seattle - Rainier Valley map.jpg
Seattle - Collier's Service Station 05.jpg
[129] North of Atlantic Street was original 1869 Seattle; in 1883, south to Hanford Street was annexed, and the rest in 1907[43]
91 Mount Baker Rainier Valley[129] [1869], 1883, 1907[43]
Seattle Map - Mount Baker.png
Seattle - Mount Baker map.jpg
Seattle - Franklin High School 02.jpg
[130] North of Atlantic Street was original 1869 Seattle; in 1883, south to Hanford Street was annexed, and the rest in 1907[43]
92 Columbia City Rainier Valley[129] 1907[43]
Seattle Map - Columbia City.png
Seattle - Columbia City map.jpg
Seattle - Columbia City Library 01.jpg
[131] A town for 15 years before it was annexed.[132]
93 Hillman City Rainier Valley[129] / Columbia City 1907[43]
 
 
 
South of Columbia City proper,[133][134]
94 Brighton Rainier Valley[129] 1907[43]
 
Seattle - Brighton map.jpg
 
[135] The lakeshore next to this neighborhood was once called Brighton Beach, but has since been subsumed into Seward Park in common parlance and according to the Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Map Atlas[citation needed]
95 Dunlap / Othello Rainier Valley[129] 1907[43][136]
 
Seattle - Dunlap map.jpg
 
[137]
96 Rainier Beach / Atlantic City Beach Rainier Valley[129] 1907[43]
 
Seattle - Rainier Beach map.jpg
Kubota Garden 01.jpg
[138]
97 Rainier View / Lakeridge Rainier Valley[129] 1907[43]
Seattle Map - Rainier View.png
Seattle - Rainier View map.jpg
 
[139]
98 Seward Park South End 1907[43]
Seattle Map - Seward Park.png
Seattle - Seward Park map.jpg
Seattle - Bikur Cholim Machzikay Hadath 01.jpg
[140]
99 Lakewood Seward Park
 
 
 
The northern part of the Seward Park neighborhood is sometimes referred to as "Lakewood"; the entire neighborhood also sometimes referred to as "Lakewood/Seward Park". The historic Lakewood Community Club is now called the Lakewood/Seward Park Community Club.[citation needed]
100 Beacon Hill South End [1869], 1875, 1883, 1886, 1907[43]
Seattle Map - Beacon Hill.png
Seattle - Beacon Hill map.jpg
Taejon Park shelter 01A.jpg
[141]
101 North Beacon Hill Beacon Hill[141] [1869], 1875, 1883, 1886, 1907[43]
Seattle - North Beacon Hill map.jpg
Seattle - 12th Ave Bridge & PacMed 01.jpg
[142]
102 Mid Beacon Hill (Maplewood) Beacon Hill[141] 1907[43]
Seattle - North Beacon Hill map.jpg
Seattle - Comet Lodge Cemetery 05.jpg
[143]
103 Holly Park[144] / NewHolly[145] Beacon Hill[141] 1907[43]
Seattle - Holly Park map.jpg
[144] Formerly the Holly Park housing project, now officially NewHolly.[145]
104 South Beacon Hill[146] / Van Asselt Beacon Hill[141] 1907[43]
Seattle - South Beacon Hill map.jpg
[146]
105 Industrial District South End various 1895–1910
Seattle Map - Industrial District.png
Seattle - Industrial District map.jpg
Seattle City Light south service center, 1998.jpg
[147] Tide lands west of Beacon Hill platted 1895, filled 1902. Other portions annexed 1907 along with West Seattle, Southeast Seattle, and South Park; 1910 with Georgetown.[43]
106 SoDo Industrial District[147] 1895/1902[43]
Seattle Map - SoDo.png
Seattle - Sodo Center 01.jpg
Tide lands west of Beacon Hill platted 1895, filled 1902.[43]
107 Harbor Island Industrial District[147] 1910[43]
Seattle Map - Harbor Island.png
Seattle - Harbor Island map.jpg
Ash Grove Cement from West Seattle Bridge 01.jpg
[148]
108 Georgetown South End 1910[43]
Seattle Map - Georgetown.png
Seattle - Georgetown map.jpg
Georgetown WA city hall 03.jpg
[149] A city for 6 years before being annexed in 1910.[43]
109 South Park South End 1907[43]
Seattle - South Park map.jpg
Seattle - Fiestas Patrias Parade 2008 - 01.jpg
[150] A town for 5 years before being annexed in 1907.[43]
110 West Seattle Seattle 1895/1902, 1907, 1950, 1954, 1956[43][136]
Seattle Map - West Seattle.png
Seattle - West Seattle map.jpg
West Seattle Library 02.jpg
[151] Tide lands platted 1895, filled 1902 (although the Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas places even the tidelands on the west side of the Duwamish in the Industrial District rather than West Seattle). West Seattle (including portions of Delridge) was a town for 5 years before being annexed in 1907.[43] Some additional annexations 1950, 1954, and 1956, mainly in Arbor Heights.[136]
111 Alki Point West Seattle[151] 1907[43]
Seattle Map - Alki.png
Seattle - Alki map.jpg
Alki Beach 1.jpg
[152]
112 North Admiral[153] / Admiral District West Seattle[151] 1907[43]
Seattle - North Admiral map.jpg
Seattle - Admiral Theater 01.jpg
[153]
113 Junction[154] / West Seattle Junction / Alaska Junction West Seattle[151] 1907[43]
Seattle - Junction map.jpg
West Seattle Easy Street 02.jpg
[154] Overlaps Genesee.
114 Seaview[155] / Mee-Kwa-Mooks West Seattle[151] 1907[43]
Seattle - Seaview map.jpg
Seattle - 4866 Beach Dr. SW 02.jpg
[155]
115 Fairmount Park West Seattle[151] 1907[43]
Seattle - Fairmount Park map.jpg
[156]
116 Genesee West Seattle[151] 1907[43]
Seattle - Genesee map.jpg
West Seattle - Holy Rosary 01.jpg
[157] Overlaps Junction.
117 Gatewood West Seattle[151] 1907[43]
Seattle - Gatewood map.jpg
[158]
118 Fauntleroy West Seattle[151] 1907[43]
Seattle - Fauntleroy map.jpg
VashonDockCarsLinedUp.jpg
[159]
119 Arbor Heights West Seattle[151] 1907, 1954, 1956[43]
Seattle - Arbor Heights map.jpg
[160]
120 Delridge South End / West Seattle[161] 1907, 1946, 1949[43]
Seattle Map - Delridge.png
Seattle - Delridge map.jpg
Seattle South CC aircraft maintenance 01.jpg
[161] Most of Delridge was part of the city of West Seattle, annexed 1907; the remainder was annexed in 1946 and 1949.[43]
121 North Delridge Delridge[161] 1907[43]
Seattle - North Delridge map.jpg
Frank B. Cooper School 04.jpg
[161]
122 Pigeon Point Delridge 1907[43]
Seattle - Pigeon Point neighborhood 27.jpg
The extreme northeast portion of Delridge, east of Delridge Way and north of Puget Park.[162]
123 Riverview Delridge[161] 1907[43]
Seattle - Riverview map.jpg
Seattle South CC 04.jpg
[161]
124 Highland Park Delridge[161] 1907[43]
Seattle - Highland Park map.jpg
[161]
125 South Delridge Delridge[161] 1907, 1946, 1949[43]
Seattle - South Delridge map.jpg
White Center tool rental.jpg
[161]
126 Roxhill Delridge[161] 1907[43]
Seattle - Roxhill map.jpg
[161]
127 High Point Delridge[161] 1907[43]
Seattle - High Point map.jpg
High Point Seattle 01.jpg
[161]

Annexations[edit]

Seattle annexed eight municipalities between 1905 and 1910, nearly doubling the area size of the city. Annexations by law were begun by the annexee and had to be approved by the Seattle City Council. The appeal of the inexpensive and accessible electric power and water system services of the public utilities were the primary motivations for the annexation movements.

Ballard was its own incorporated town for 17 years, annexed as its own ward. West Seattle incorporated in 1902, then annexed Spring Hill, Riverside, Alki Point, and Youngstown districts. It was the largest of the incorporated towns to be annexed. Southeast Seattle merged the towns of Hillman City and York with other Rainier Valley neighborhoods, then incorporated for the only reason of being annexed.[163] Similarly, the town of South Seattle consisted of mostly industrial Duwamish Valley neighborhoods (except Georgetown); one enclave adjacent to Georgetown omitted at this time was annexed 1921; some land near the river in this area remains part of unincorporated King County. In 1910 Georgetown was the last of this sequence of small incorporated cities and towns to be annexed to Seattle before the 1954 annexation of Lake City.

The following previously incorporated cites and towns were annexed by Seattle. This list is in order of annexation. Other areas annexed to Seattle, were unincorporated before annexation. Examples of the latter include the northern part of Queen Anne Hill, the University District, and the northern aread of the city that were once part of then-unincorporated Shoreline.

  • Town of South Seattle, incorporated 1905, annexed 20 October 1905.
  • City of Columbia (Columbia City), incorporated 1892, annexed 3 May 1907
  • Town of Ravenna, incorporated 1906, annexed 15 January 1907
  • Southeast Seattle—Hillman City, York, and other Rainier Valley neighorhoods except Columbia City—incorporated July 1906, annexed 7 January 1907
  • Town of South Park, incorporated 1902, annexed 3 May 1907.
  • City of Ballard, incorporated January 1890, annexed 29 May 1907
  • City of West Seattle, incorporated April 1902, annexed 24 July 1907
  • City of Georgetown, incorporated 1904, annexed 4 April 1910[136][164]
  • Lake City, incorporated township 1949, annexed January 1954[11]

Future[edit]

Because of the cost of providing city services, low-density residential neighborhoods represent a net revenue loss for municipalities.[165] Because vehicle-license revenue is no longer used to subsidize unincorporated areas, these neighborhoods have become increasingly orphaned.[citation needed]

In April 2004, the City Council voted to defer a decision on Mayor Nickels' proposal to designate the West Hill and North Highline neighborhoods, part of unincorporated King County, as potential annexation areas (PAAs) for at least a year. Because of the tax revolt that took place in Washington in the late 1990s and early 21st century, the county's budget has been reduced and the county has said it is unlikely to be able to maintain adequate levels of funding for urban services in unincorporated areas. The nearby city of Burien, however, has issued a 2004 draft report for its own annexation of all or part of North Highline.

North Highline, which adjoins SeaTac, Burien, and Tukwila in addition to Seattle, consists of the Boulevard Park neighborhood and part of White Center. West Hill, which abuts Tukwila and Renton as well as Seattle, consists of Skyway, Bryn Mawr, Lakeridge, and Earlington. Its 2010 population is 15,645 according to the US Census.

On December 11, 2006, the Seattle City Council agreed to designate North Highline a "potential annexation area".[166]

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ Greg Nickels (July 2005). "Nickels Newsletter – July 2005". Archived from the original on 2006-10-25. Retrieved 2007-10-11. 
  2. ^ There is a book about Seattle by Arthur J O'Donnell, In the City of Neighborhoods, iUniverse, Inc., 2004), ISBN 0-595-33792-9.
  3. ^ a b Jack Broom (2002-10-05). "New Seattle map: There goes the neighborhood". Seattle Times. Retrieved 2007-10-11. 
  4. ^ Phelps, p. 34; Chapter 16, "Street Names and House Numbering", pp. 225-235; Chapter 15, "Annexation", pp. 216–224, map "to 1921", p. 217; map "to 1975", p. 224, map key table pp.222-3.
  5. ^ Speidel, William C. (1978). Doc Maynard: the man who invented Seattle. Seattle: Nettle Creek Publishing Company. pp. 196–197, 200. ISBN 0-914890-02-6.  . Speidel, William C. (1967). Sons of the profits; or, There's no business like grow business: the Seattle story, 1851-1901. Seattle: Nettle Creek Publishing Company. pp. 196–197, 200. ISBN 0-914890-00-X, ISBN 0-914890-06-9 Check |isbn= value (help). 
  6. ^ Wilma, David (2001-05-21). "Seattle Landmarks: West Queen Anne Walls (1913)". HistoryLink.org Essay 3198. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
    Cf. "West Queen Anne Walls, 'W'". Historic Preservation :: Department of Neighborhoods > Individual Landmarks & the Designation Process > Landmarks A-Z. 2006-05-21. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  7. ^ a b Wilma, David (2001-04-01). "Renton Hill residents organize Seattle's first community club on June 18, 1901.". HistoryLink.org Essay 3157. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  8. ^ Wilma, David (2001-04-01). "Renton Hill Community Club reorganizes to exclude racial minorities from the neighborhood in 1929.". HistoryLink.org Essay 3158. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  9. ^ Wilma, David (2002-07-05). "Magnolia Branch, The Seattle Public Library". HistoryLink.org Essay 3879. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  10. ^ David Wilma (2002-10-08). "Greenwood Branch, The Seattle Public Library – HistoryLink.org Essay 3980". HistoryLink.org Online Encyclopedia of Washington State History. Retrieved 6 May 2009. 
  11. ^ a b Wilma, David (2002-12-05). "Lake City Branch, The Seattle Public Library". HistoryLink.org Essay 4031. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  12. ^ a b c d e Dorpat, Paul (July 24, 2001). "Seattle Neighborhoods: Wallingford -- Thumbnail History". HistoryLink Essays. HistoryLink.org. Retrieved 2006-07-30. 
  13. ^ a b c d Dorpat, Paul (1984, 2nd ed. 1994). Seattle, now & then. Seattle: Tartu Publications. ISBN 0-9614357-0-4 (v. 1), 0961435712 (v. 1, pbk.), ISBN 0-9614357-1-2 (pbk.) Check |isbn= value (help).  Ch. 42, 58, 64 (Fremont); 36, 37, 42, 64, 71 (Latona); 36, 37, 42, 71 (University).
  14. ^ Dorpat, Paul (n.d. (1986)). Seattle, now & then, volume II. Seattle: Tartu Publications. ISBN 0-9614357-2-0, ISBN 0-9614357-2-0 hardcover Check |isbn= value (help).  Ch. 52.
  15. ^ Wilma (20 August 2001, Essay 3502)
  16. ^ Williams, David B. (1999-05-10). "Olmsted Parks in Seattle -- A Snapshot History". HistoryLink.org Essay 1124. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  17. ^ "Lake Union". Seattle Neighborhoods. n.d. Archived from the original on 2006-02-24. Retrieved 2006-05-21. 
  18. ^ Hatt, Schmid, Nobbe, & Mitchell
  19. ^ a b Gregory, James (undated, project dated 2004–2011). "Segregated Seattle". Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project. The University of Washington. Retrieved 2011-04-18. 
  20. ^ Turnbull, Lornet (2005-06-03). "Homeowners find records still hold blot of racism". Local News (The Seattle Times). pp. B1–. Retrieved 2006-05-21. 
  21. ^ a b Wilma, David (May 1, 2002). "Seattle voters reject a city manager and district elections on June 30, 1914". HistoryLink.org Essay 3761. Retrieved May 4, 2009. 
  22. ^ Wilma, David (May 11, 2002). "Seattle voters reject district city council elections and Rich Man's Charter on November 2, 1926". HistoryLink.org Essay 3768. Retrieved May 4, 2009. 
  23. ^ Kit Oldham and David Wilma (September 7, 2006). "Washington voters reject property rights, casino gambling, and other ballot measures on November 7, 1995". HistoryLink.org Essay 7916. Retrieved May 4, 2009. 
  24. ^ Matt Rosenberg (2005-06-15). "Red in a Blue City: Seattle Republicans". Seattle Weekly. Retrieved 2011-04-19. 
  25. ^ Jake Batsell, Jack Broom, Barbara A. Serrano (March 18, 1998). "Stewart Case: $5 Million Fine". Seattle Times. Retrieved May 4, 2009. 
  26. ^ Neighborhood Service Centers, City of Seattle. Retrieved 17 April 2011.
  27. ^ Phelps, pp. 82–84
  28. ^ American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) standards for urban areas having more than 50,000 people
  29. ^ (1) "Planned Arterials Map Legend Definitions" (PDF). "Street Classification Maps". Seattle Department of Transportation. 2004-01-02. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
    (2) "Street Classification Maps". Seattle Department of Transportation. 2005. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
    http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/streetclassmaps/plan.pdf High-Resolution Version], PDF format, 16.1 MB
    Medium-Resolution Version, PDF format, 1.45 MB 12 January 2004.
    Low-Resolution Version, PDF format, 825 KB 12 January 2004.
    "Planned Arterials Map Legend Definitions", PDF format. 12 January 2004.
    The high resolution version is good for printing, 11 x 17. The low and medium resolution versions are good for quicker online viewing. [Source: "Street Classification Maps, Note on Accessing These PDF Files"]
  30. ^ "Street Classification Maps, Note on Accessing These PDF Files". "Street Classification Maps". Seattle Department of Transportation. 2005. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  31. ^ Wilma, David (2006-03-20). "Seattle voters reject district elections for city council on November 7, 1995.". HistoryLink.org Essay 4246. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
    Note: Date 28 September 2003, date of file corrected on March 20, 2006.[dead link]
  32. ^ Maria Christensen, Newcomer's Handbook for Moving to and Living in Seattle: Including Bellevue, Redmond, Everett, and Tacoma, Newcomer's Handbooks, First Books, 2007, ISBN 0-912301-73-2. p. 17. "Unlike many other major cities, Seattle neighborhoods do not have official borders."
  33. ^ Maple Leaf: Neighborhood is another one of Seattle's best-kept secrets[dead link]
  34. ^ MLCC - Neighborhood Map
  35. ^ ""Maple Leaf", map". Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Map Atlas. n.d., map .jpg 2002-06-17. Retrieved 2009-04-27. 
  36. ^ Other well-documented interpretations of names and boundaries of Seattle's neighborhoods can be found in the following:
    • "Seattle Neighborhoods" from the HistoryLink Encyclopedia of Washington State History (particularly their "Thumbnail Histories", many of which reference records of neighborhood organizations and public library branches).
    • Myra Phelps, A Narrative History (a history of Seattle through Engineering Department records and notes).
    • The "Neighbors"[dead link] project of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer (1996-2000), currently updated as the "Webtowns" section of the online Post-Intelligencer.
    • Neighborhood articles in the archives of the Post-Intelligencer,[1][dead link] The Times, and local district newspapers. (Post-Intelligencer archives before 1986 are not available online. The Seattle Times archives before 1990 are not available online.)
    • "Street Classification Maps" from the Seattle Department of Transportation. The Transportation Department has built and designated secondary arterials (officially called minor arterials) predominantly along neighborhood boundaries.
  37. ^ "List of Neighborhoods". Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Map Atlas. Retrieved 2009-04-29. 
    Shenk, Pollack, Dornfeld, Frantilla, and Neman (authors of the Seattle Atlas) drew largely upon primary sources. Phelps is also a high quality secondary source, since much of her sources were Department archives of official documents and reports, in addition to professional journal articles, as well as books and articles back to the early 20th century. Phelps and Shenk et al. have complete citations in this article's Bibliography.
    The Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Map Atlas was "not designed or intended as an 'official' City of Seattle neighborhood map... [but] to define neighborhood district names and boundaries in a way that improves document indexing and retrieval." As such, some of its designations have no existence outside of the city's map and indexing system, such as Pike Market (Pike Place Market in actuality), Mann, Minor, and Mid Beacon Hill. In addition, the map's attempt to reduce the number of top-level districts has led to certain discrepancies from facts on the ground, such as Harrison/Denny-Blaine being included in the Central District and Madison Park being included in Capitol Hill.
  38. ^ Cline, Scott, City Archivist (n.d., ~2006; second edition). "Department of Community Development (1600)". "Seattle Municipal Archives Record Descriptions", A Guide To The Archives Of The City Of Seattle. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  39. ^ The Seattle Post-Intelligencer's "Neighborhood Profiles" are not available online. The concept has been revisited 1996-2000 as the "Neighbors"[dead link] project, currently updated as the "Webtowns" section.
  40. ^ [1869] means part of Seattle as incorporation, December 1869. Otherwise, year listed is actual annexation, not the date of the prerequisite enabling city ordinance.
    The State Legislature incorporated the town of Seattle in January 1865, disincorporated January 1867 after petition, reincorporated December 1869. The initial incorporation was with a board of trustees. The second incorporation was with a mayor and town council. Lange, Greg; Tate, Cassandra (1998-11-04). "Legislature incorporates the Town of Seattle for the first time on January 14, 1865.". HistoryLink.org Essay 168. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  41. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad (Map breaking city into three major areas) and NN 1000 Neighborhood districts (a list of districts), Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  42. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co cp cq cr cs ct cu cv cw cx cy cz da db dc dd de df dg dh di dj dk dl dm dn do dp dq dr ds dt du dv dw dx dy dz ea eb ec ed ee ef eg eh ei ej Phelps
  43. ^ Broadview, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  44. ^ Bitter Lake (neighborhood), Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  45. ^ North Beach/Blue Ridge, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  46. ^ Parts of Crown Hill annexed 1907 as part of Ballard
  47. ^ Crown Hill, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  48. ^ Greenwood, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  49. ^ a b c d e Northgate, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  50. ^ Haller Lake, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  51. ^ Pinehurst, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  52. ^ North College Park, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  53. ^ Maple Leaf, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  54. ^ a b c d e f Lake City, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 201-04-24.
  55. ^ Cedar Park, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  56. ^ Matthews Beach, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  57. ^ Meadowbrook, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  58. ^ Olympic Hills, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  59. ^ Victory Heights, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  60. ^ Wedgwood, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  61. ^ View Ridge, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  62. ^ Sand Point, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  63. ^ Roosevelt, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  64. ^ a b Ravenna, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  65. ^ Bryant, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  66. ^ Windermere, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  67. ^ Laurelhurst, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  68. ^ Windermere, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  69. ^ Souvenir guide of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition – held at Seattle, Washington, June 1st to October (Seattle 1909), p.11. Image online.
  70. ^ University of Washington Computing and Communications, Facilities Services (2005, modified 5 May 2010). "Northeast Campus Map". UW Home > UWIN > About the UW > Campus Maps. University of Washington. Retrieved 2011-04-18. 
  71. ^ Publication Services & UW Facility Services (Revised July 1996). The University of Washington Campus & Vicinity (map). Seattle: University of Washington. 
  72. ^ University of Washington Publication Services (Revised September 1991). The University of Washington Campus & Vicinity (map). Seattle: University of Washington.  Compiled, designed, drafted in cooperation between Physical Plant and the Department of Geography, August 1971, revised Sherman (August 1991).
  73. ^ Wallingford, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  74. ^ Green Lake, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 24 April 2011.
  75. ^ Fremont, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  76. ^ Phinney Ridge, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  77. ^ a b c d e f Ballard, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  78. ^ West Woodland, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  79. ^ Whittier Heights, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  80. ^ Adams, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  81. ^ Sunset Hill, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  82. ^ Loyal Heights, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  83. ^ a b c d Magnolia, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  84. ^ Lawton Park, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  85. ^ Briarcliff, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  86. ^ Southeast Magnolia, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  87. ^ Interbay, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  88. ^ a b c d e Queen Anne, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  89. ^ North Queen Anne, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  90. ^ East Queen Anne, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  91. ^ Lower Queen Anne, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  92. ^ West Queen Anne, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  93. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Capitol Hill, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  94. ^ a b Portage Bay, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  95. ^ Broadway, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  96. ^ Tyrone Beason, Seattle's Pike/Pine corridor does density right, Seattle Times, 23 January 2010, corrected 19 February 2010. Retrieved 17 June 2011.
  97. ^ Pike/Pine: Cars, Bars, and Dead Rock Stars, Seattle Architecture Foundation. Retrieved 17 June 2011.
  98. ^ Erica C. Barnett, The Death of Pike/Pine, The Stranger, 29 November 2006. Retrieved 17 June 2011.
  99. ^ A somewhat cryptic older note here says "1891, E of 15th, N of E Galer, N of E Lynn, 1891, Phelps. 1950, 1952, 1953.[citation needed] This needs clarification: This would have the farthest part of Montlake from the city center annexed in 1891, and the rest more than half a century later.
  100. ^ Montlake, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  101. ^ Stevens, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  102. ^ Portage Bay, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  103. ^ History, Organizational Description, Boundaries, Cascade Neighborhood Council, November 1997. Accessed 3 February 2008.
  104. ^ Westlake, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  105. ^ Eastlake, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  106. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Downtown, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  107. ^ Denny Regrade, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  108. ^ Belltown, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  109. ^ Pike-Market, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  110. ^ The 17-acre (6.9 ha) Pike Market neighborhood is nearly twice the area of the 9-acre (3.6 ha) Pike Place Market Historic District.
    (1) Lange, Greg (1 January 1999, lead paragraph updated 2006). "Seattle's Pike Place Market opens on August 17, 1907.". HistoryLink.org Essay 1949. Retrieved 2006-07-21. 
    (2) Crowley, Walt (1999-07-29). "Pike Place Market (Seattle) -- Thumbnail History". HistoryLink.org Essay 1602. Retrieved 2006-07-21. 
  111. ^ Central Business District, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  112. ^ First Hill, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas.
  113. ^ Pioneer Square, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 11 May 2011.
  114. ^ International District, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 11 May 2011.
  115. ^ Yesler Terrace, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 11 May 2011.
  116. ^ Central Waterfront, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 11 May 2011.
  117. ^ seattlewestedge.org home page, Metropolitan Improvement District. Retrieved 17 June 2011.
  118. ^ So that would make downtown East West Edge?, Puget Sound Business Journal, 15 July 2001. Retrieved 17 June 2011.
  119. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Central Area, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 11 May 2011.
  120. ^ Mann, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 11 May 2011.
  121. ^ Minor, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 11 May 2011.
  122. ^ Atlantic, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 11 May 2011.
  123. ^ Merritt, Mike; Goldsmith, Steven (1994-07-13). "The neighborhood that time forgot". Neighbors, History and background on Judkins Park, Neighbors project (Seattle Post-Intelligencer). Retrieved 2006-04-21.  [dead link]
  124. ^ Judkins Foundation (1999-02-09). "Where is Judkins Park?". Judkins Park Review. City of Seattle. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  125. ^ Madrona, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 11 May 2011.
  126. ^ Harrison & Denny-Blaine, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 11 May 2011.
  127. ^ Leschi, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 11 May 2011.
  128. ^ a b c d e f g h Rainier Valley, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 11 May 2011.
  129. ^ Mount Baker, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 11 May 2011.
  130. ^ Columbia City, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 11 May 2011.
  131. ^ Several articles about Columbia City (and other places in the Rainier Valley) can be found at Articles, Rainier Valley Historical Society.
  132. ^ http://www.hillmancitybiz.org. Possibly dead link April 2011; a backup can be found at http://replay.web.archive.org/20080703172423/http://www.hillmancitybiz.org/sitemap
  133. ^ Neighborhood Plans: Columbia City / Hillman City, Seattle Department of Neighborhoods. Retrieved 11 May 2011
  134. ^ Brighton, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 11 May 2011.
  135. ^ a b c d Cline, Scott, City Archivist (n.d., ~2006; second edition). "Annexed Cities (9100)". "Seattle Municipal Archives Record Descriptions", A Guide To The Archives Of The City Of Seattle. Office of the Seattle City Clerk. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  136. ^ Dunlap, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 12 May 2011.
  137. ^ Rainier Beach, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 12 May 2011.
  138. ^ Rainier View, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 12 May 2011.
  139. ^ Seward Park, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 12 May 2011.
  140. ^ a b c d e Beacon Hill, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 12 May 2011.
  141. ^ North Beacon Hill, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 13 May 2011.
  142. ^ Mid Beacon Hill, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 13 May 2011.
  143. ^ a b Holly Park, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 13 May 2011.
  144. ^ a b (Untitled page), NewHolly community section of seattlehousing.org (SHA). Retrieved 13 May 2011.
  145. ^ a b South Beacon Hill, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 13 May 2011.
  146. ^ a b c Industrial District, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 13 May 2011.
  147. ^ Harbor Island, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 13 May 2011.
  148. ^ Georgetown, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 14 May 2011.
  149. ^ South Park, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 14 May 2011.
  150. ^ a b c d e f g h i j West Seattle, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 14 May 2011.
  151. ^ Alki, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 13 May 2011.
  152. ^ a b North Admiral, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 13 May 2011.
  153. ^ a b North Admiral, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 13 May 2011.
  154. ^ a b Seaview, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 13 May 2011.
  155. ^ Fairmount Park, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 13 May 2011.
  156. ^ Genesee, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 13 May 2011.
  157. ^ Gatewood, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 13 May 2011.
  158. ^ Fauntleroy, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 13 May 2011.
  159. ^ Arbor Heights, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 13 May 2011.
  160. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Delridge, Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Atlas. Retrieved 14 May 2011.
  161. ^ Who We Are, pigeonpoint.org (Pigeon Point Neighborhood Council). Retrieved 15 May 2011.
  162. ^ Rainier Valley neighborhoods south of Hanford Street to Rainier Beach at Kenyon Street, generally east of 24th Avenue S. - Phelps, pp. 216–218, 222–224
  163. ^ Phelps, pp. 216-218, 222-224
  164. ^ Phelps, pp. 216-224
  165. ^ Angela Galloway (December 12, 2006). "City Council to pursue annexing North Highline". Hearst Seattle Media, LLC. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • "About the Seattle City Clerk's Online Information Services". Information Services. Seattle City Clerk's Office. 2006-04-30, revised. Retrieved 2006-05-21. 
    See heading, "Note about limitations of these data".
  • "Ballard". Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Map Atlas. n.d., map .jpg c. 13–17 June 2002. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
    Maps "NN-1120S", "NN-1130S", "NN-1140S".Jpg [sic] dated 13 June; "NN-1030S", "NN-1040S".jpg dated 17 June 2002.
  • "Downtown". Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Map Atlas. n.d., map .jpg c. 13–17 June 2002. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
    Maps "NN-1120S", "NN-1130S", "NN-1140S".Jpg [sic] dated 13 June; "NN-1030S", "NN-1040S".jpg dated 17 June 2002.
  • "Map home". Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Map Atlas. n.d., map .jpg c. 13–17 June 2002. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
    Full city map, not titled.
    Maps "NN-1120S", "NN-1130S", "NN-1140S".Jpg [sic] dated 13 June; "NN-1030S", "NN-1040S".jpg dated 17 June 2002.
  • "Lake City". Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Map Atlas. Office of the Seattle City Clerk. n.d., map .jpg 2002-06-17. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  • "Neighborhood Resources". Department of Neighborhoods. City of Seattle. 2005. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  • "List of Neighborhoods". Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Map Atlas. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
    Hierarchical list of neighborhoods by districts, largely in geographical order from north to south.
  • "Northgate". Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Map Atlas. Office of the Seattle City Clerk. n.d., map .jpg c. 2002-06-17. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  • "PDF Note". Principal, Minor and Collector arterials. Seattle Department of Transportation. 2005. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  • Phelps, Myra L. (1978). Public works in Seattle. Seattle: Seattle Engineering Department. ISBN 0-9601928-1-6. 
  • "Seattle Interactive Map". Seattle Neighborhoods. HistoryLink.org. n.d. Archived from the original on 2006-02-24. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  • "Rainier Valley, map". Seattle City Clerk's Neighborhood Map Atlas. Office of the Seattle City Clerk. n.d., map .jpg c. 13–17 June 2002. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
    Maps "NN-1030S", "NN-1040S".jpg 17 June 2002, maps "NN-1120S", "NN-1130S", "NN-1140S".Jpg [sic] 13 June.
  • Shenk, Carol; Pollack, Laurie; Dornfeld, Ernie; Frantilla, Anne; and Neman, Chris (2002-06-26, maps .jpg c. 2002-06-15). "About neighborhood maps". Seattle City Clerk's Office Neighborhood Map Atlas. Information Services, Seattle City Clerk's Office. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
    Sources for this atlas and the neighborhood names used in it include a 1980 neighborhood map produced by the Department of Community Development (relocated to the Department of Neighborhoods and other agencies), Seattle Public Library indexes (Special Collections, Seattle Collection in the Seattle Room), a 1984-1986 Neighborhood Profiles feature series in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, numerous parks, land use and transportation planning studies, and records in the Seattle Municipal Archives.
    [Maps "NN-1120S", "NN-1130S", "NN-1140S".Jpg [sic] dated 13 June 2002; "NN-1030S", "NN-1040S".jpg dated 17 June 2002.]
    "The Neighbors[dead link] project was published weekly in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer from 1996 to 2000. The page remained available for archival purposes for some years after being superseded by the P-I's Webtowns section.
  • Wilma, David (2001-07-18). "Seattle Neighborhoods: Lake City -- Thumbnail History". HistoryLink.org Essay 3449. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
  • "Webtowns". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Detailed city map, Seattle City Clerk's Office Neighborhood Map Atlas. Detailed city map, otherwise not titled.
    Click on a number or name for the more detailed north, central, or south city map or a map of a selected neighborhood.
  • "Seattle City Clerk Thesaurus". Last update: 19 April 2004. Archived from the original on 2006-02-09. Retrieved 2006-04-21. 
    Provides a language for indexing and retrieving legislation and other records in the City Clerk's Office. For more details on how to use the thesaurus, read the Introduction[dead link].
  • Neighborhoods GIS source data file (Shapefile format)

External links[edit]