Neikea

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In Greek mythology, the Neikea (Greek: Νείκεα; singular: Νεῖκος Neikos "quarrels") were goddesses of arguments. Hesiod's Theogony identifies them as children of Eris (strife) through parthenogenesis and siblings Lethe ("forgetfulness"), Ponos ("toil"), Limos ("starvation"), the Algea ("pains"), the Hysminai ("fightings"), the Makhai ("battles"), the Phonoi ("murders"), the Androktasiai ("man-slaughters"), the Pseudologoi ("lies"), the Amphilogiai ("disputes"), Dysnomia ("lawlessness"), Atë ("ruin"), and Horkos ("oath").[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hesiod (author); Evelyn-White, H.G. (trans.) (1914). The Theogony of Hesiod. p. 226. 

Sources[edit]

  •  This article incorporates text from Theogony, by Hesiod, translated by Hugh G. Evelyn-White, a publication from 1914 now in the public domain in the United States.

External links[edit]