Neil McPhee

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Neil McPhee
Sport(s) Baseball
Biographical details
Born (1943-10-14) October 14, 1943 (age 70)
Playing career
Baseball
1962–1965

Ice Hockey
1961–1965

Northeastern


Northeastern
Position(s) 2B
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1986–2014 Northeastern
Head coaching record
Overall 697–623–4

Neil McPhee (born October 14, 1943) is an American former college baseball coach, the head coach of the Northeastern Huskies baseball program from 1986 to 2014.[1][2]

Playing career[edit]

McPhee was a standout second baseman at Northeastern for four seasons, including a trip to the 1964 NCAA Tournament. McPhee also played ice hockey for the Huskies, completing two seasons before losing his senior season to a broken arm. The Minnesota Twins made him a fifth round pick in the 1965 MLB Draft, and he played three seasons in the Twins organization, reaching Class-A. McPhee was inducted into the NU Athletic Hall of Fame in 1980.[1]

Coaching career[edit]

In 1967, McPhee hung up his spikes and turned to coaching. He began at Newton South High School in Newton, Massachusetts, where he coached baseball and ice hockey from 1967 to 1985. After several league titles and appearances in Eastern Massachusetts tournaments, McPhee was hired as the tenth head baseball coach at Northeastern. In his 28 years with the Huskies, he claimed three Conference Tournament titles (all in the America East Conference), two regular season crowns, and appeared in three NCAA Tournaments. He saw fourteen players drafted, including Carlos Peña and Adam Ottavino; several other players have signed professional contracts. McPhee led the Huskies to nineteen winning seasons and was named NAC Coach of the Year twice. After he announced his planned retirement at the close of the 2014 season, the Huskies named Mike Glavine, another McPhee product who played in the major leagues, as his successor. Glavine succeeded McPhee following the end of the season, in which Northeastern finished 5th in the CAA and went 1-2 in the conference tournament.[1][3][4]

Head coaching record[edit]

This table shows McPhee's record as a head coach at the Division I level.[1][5]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Northeastern (North Atlantic/America East Conference) (1986–2005)
1986 Northeastern 25–14 9–5 2nd
1987 Northeastern 20–14 9–6
1988 Northeastern 19–23–1 7–8 5th
1989 Northeastern 21–20–1 5–10
1990 Northeastern 26–20 9–6 3rd
1991 Northeastern 35–15 12–3 2nd
1992 Northeastern 22–18–1 16–12 4th
1993 Northeastern 17–19 7–14 7th NAC Tournament[a]
1994 Northeastern 35–16 18–6 2nd NCAA Regional
1995 Northeastern 29–17 16–8 2nd NAC Tournament[b]
1996 Northeastern 18–26 11–11 5th NAC Tournament[c]
1997 Northeastern 33–19 12–12 5th NCAA Regional
1998 Northeastern 26–22 17–9 2nd AEC Tournament[d]
1999 Northeastern 28–21 18–10 3rd AEC Tournament[e]
2000 Northeastern 25–24 15–11 4th AEC Tournament[f]
2001 Northeastern 19–32 11–17 4th AEC Tournament[g]
2002 Northeastern 29–22 11–11 3rd AEC Tournament[h]
2003 Northeastern 27–24 12–10 4th NCAA Regional
2004 Northeastern 28–20 14–6 1st AEC Tournament[i]
2005 Northeastern 26–23 14–6 1st AEC Tournament[j]
Northeastern (AEC): 508–419–3 243–181
Northeastern (Colonial Athletic Association) (2006–2014)
2006 Northeastern 27–23 19–10 3rd
2007 Northeastern 24–22 12–17 8th
2008 Northeastern 25–26–1 12–17–1 7th
2009 Northeastern 28–25 13–11 4th CAA Tournament[k]
2010 Northeastern 13–31 5–19 11th
2011 Northeastern 18–33 12–18 9th
2012 Northeastern 23–28 13–17 8th
2013 Northeastern 31–26 12–15 7th CAA Tournament[l]
Northeastern (CAA): 189–214–1 98–124–1
Total: 697–652–4

      National champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

  1. ^ All eight of the NAC's teams qualified for the tournament in 1993.
  2. ^ All eight of the NAC's teams qualified for the tournament in 1995.
  3. ^ The top six finishers of the NAC's nine teams qualified for the tournament in 1996.
  4. ^ The top four finishers of the AEC's eight teams qualified for the tournament in 1998.
  5. ^ The top four finishers of the AEC's eight teams qualified for the tournament in 1999.
  6. ^ The top four finishers of the AEC's eight teams qualified for the tournament in 2000.
  7. ^ The top four finishers of the AEC's eight teams qualified for the tournament in 2001.
  8. ^ The top four finishers of the AEC's seven teams qualified for the tournament in 2002.
  9. ^ The top four finishers of the AEC's eight teams qualified for the tournament in 2004.
  10. ^ The top four finishers of the AEC's eight teams qualified for the tournament in 2005.
  11. ^ The top six finishers of the CAA's eleven teams qualified for the tournament in 2009.
  12. ^ The top six of the CAA's eight eligible teams qualified for the tournament in 2013. Old Dominion and Georgia State were ineligible.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Staff Directory". Northeastern Huskies. Retrieved November 27, 2013. 
  2. ^ Joshua Cummins (August 6, 2013). "Veteran Northeastern skipper McPhee to step down in 2014". New England Baseball Journal. Retrieved November 27, 2013. 
  3. ^ Anthony Gulizia (September 28, 2013). "Billerica’s Mike Glavine the right fit for Northeastern baseball". Boston Globe (Boston, MA). Retrieved November 27, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Glavine tabbed to take over at Northeastern". Associated Press. September 25, 2013. Retrieved November 27, 2013. 
  5. ^ CAA Baseball Record Book. Colonial Athletic Association. Retrieved November 26, 2013.