Neil O'Brien

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For other people named Neil O'Brien, see Neil O'Brien (disambiguation).
O'Brien speaking in 2012

Neil O'Brien was the Director of the centre-right think tank Policy Exchange. He was appointed in August 2008, succeeding Anthony Browne and Nicholas Boles in this role. Since November 2012 he has served as a Special Adviser to the Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne

O'Brien was previously, between 2005–2008,[citation needed] Director of Open Europe, a think tank working for free market reform in Europe. He grew up in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, and took a first in Philosophy, Politics and Economics, at Christ Church, Oxford.[citation needed]

In March 2010, O'Brien co-authored with Ross Clark a wide-ranging book called The Renewal of Government.[1] It was praised by Michael Gove, then Shadow Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families, and now Secretary of State for Education, who said that it “lays down with admirable clarity and form a set of radical policies ... which in the field of education I think are peerless”.[2]

O'Brien writes a regular blog for the Daily Telegraph[3] and has written in the Financial Times,[4] the Guardian[5] and the Times.[6] He has appeared on BBC Newsnight,[7][8][9][10] Sky News[11] and Channel Four news.[12] He has spoken on BBC radio programmes including The Moral Maze[13] and the Today Programme.[14][15][16] He has commented on a broad range of issues including public spending, welfare reform, housing, education and the environment. He tweets on public policy as “NeilDotObrien.”[17]

Neil O'Brien was ranked number 14 in Total Politics’ poll of the top 50 political influencers in Britain,[18] named in The Daily Telegraph as one of the "Top 100 Most Influential people on the Right",[19] in the Sunday Times as one of the “New Political Elite”[20] and as one of the Evening Standard's "Power 1000 of London’s New Influentials".[21]

In November 2012, O'Brien was hired as a policy advisor by Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne.[22]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Publications". Policy Exchange. 10 March 2010. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  2. ^ "PolicyExchangeUK's Channel". YouTube. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  3. ^ "Neil O'Brien – Telegraph Blogs". London: Blogs.telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  4. ^ "/ Comment / Opinion – Give the falling property market a push". Financial Times. 3 August 2010. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  5. ^ "Neil O'Brien: Cameronism puts family first | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk". The Guardian (UK). 1 October 2008. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  6. ^ Post. "The Times | UK News, World News and Opinion". The Times (UK). Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  7. ^ "In the news". Policy Exchange. 4 December 2009. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  8. ^ "In the news". Policy Exchange. 15 December 2009. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  9. ^ "In the news". Policy Exchange. 14 January 2010. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  10. ^ "In the news". Policy Exchange. 26 March 2010. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  11. ^ "In the news". Policy Exchange. 20 October 2010. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  12. ^ "Immigration cap 'puts economic recovery at risk' – Channel 4 News". Channel4.com. 9 September 2010. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  13. ^ "In the news". Policy Exchange. 10 November 2010. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  14. ^ "In the news". Policy Exchange. 15 December 2009. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  15. ^ "In the news". Policy Exchange. 15 May 2010. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  16. ^ "In the news". Policy Exchange. 11 September 2010. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  17. ^ "Neil O'Brien (@NeilDotObrien) op Twitter". Twitter. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  18. ^ [1][dead link]
  19. ^ Dale, Iain; Brivati, Brian (3 October 2010). "Top 100 most influential Right-wingers: 100-76". London: Telegraph. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  20. ^ Post. "The Times | UK News, World News and Opinion". The Times (UK). Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  21. ^ "The One Thousand – Politics". Evening Standard. London. 10 November 2009. Retrieved 10 November 2011. 
  22. ^ Watt, Nicholas (30 November 2012). "George Osborne hires thinktank boss to attract new voters". The Guardian. Retrieved 30 November 2012. 

External links[edit]