Nematogenys inermis

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Nematogenys inermis
Nematogenys inermis.jpg
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Siluriformes
Superfamily: Loricarioidea
Family: Nematogenyidae
C. H. Eigenmann, 1927
Genus: Nematogenys
Girard, 1855
Species: N. inermis
Binomial name
Nematogenys inermis
Guichenot, 1848
Synonyms
  • Trichomycterus inermis
    Guichenot, 1848
  • Nematogenys nigricans
    Philippi, 1866
  • Nematogenys pallidus
    Philippi, 1866

Nematogenys inermis is a species of mountain catfish, the only extant species in the family Nematogenyiidae. This species is endemic to Chile where it is found in fresh waters in central Chile.[2] This species grows to a length of 40.7 cm (16.0 in) NG.[3]

The body is naked (without scales) and elongated. The three pairs of barbels are the chin (mental) barbels, maxillary barbels, and nasal barbels. No adipose fin is present. The opercle lacks spines.[2]

The Nematogenyidae and Trichomycteridae are sister groups that together form a clade sister to the families Callichthyidae, Scoloplacidae, Astroblepidae, and Loricariidae.[4]

One extinct species, Nematogenys cuivi, has been described in this genus.

References[edit]

  1. ^ World Conservation Monitoring Centre (1996). "Nematogenys inermis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2006. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 15 June 2007. 
  2. ^ a b Nelson, Joseph, S. (2006). Fishes of the World. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. ISBN 0-471-25031-7. 
  3. ^ Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2011). "Nematogenys inermis" in FishBase. December 2011 version.
  4. ^ Diogo, Rui; Chardon, Michel; Vandewalle, Pierre (January 2006). "On the osteology and myology of the cephalic region and pectoral girdle of Nematogenys inermis (Ghichenot, 1848), with comments on the autapomorphies and phylogenetic relationships of the Nematogenyidae (Teleostei : Siluriformes)" (PDF). Belg. J. Zool. 136 (1): 15–24.