Neoscona crucifera

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For the spider species also known as "barn spiders", see Araneus cavaticus.
Neoscona crucifera
BarnSpider.jpg
Ventral view
DorsalViewNeoscons.jpg
Dorsal view
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Arachnida
Order: Araneae
Family: Araneidae
Genus: Neoscona
Species: N. crucifera
Binomial name
Neoscona crucifera
(Lucas, 1839)

Neoscona crucifera is an orb-weaver spider in the family Araneidae. It is found in the United States from Maine to Florida in the east, to Minnesota in the Midwest, to Arizona in the southwest, and in Mexico. Its common names include Hentz’s orbweaver,[1] and barn spider,[2] though the latter nickname suggests the confusion that can result from using common names for spiders, as the name "barn spider" is also commonly used for the species Araneus cavaticus.

Generally nocturnal, females may become diurnal in the fall.[3] Females are about 9.5–19 millimeters (0.37–0.75 in) long, while males are somewhat smaller. The upper surface of the abdomen is brown and hairy. The legs display alternating light and dark brown bands. The undersurface of the abdomen is black, with two white spots.

The orb part of the web may be nearly 2 feet (0.61 m) in diameter.[4] The eggsac consists of fluffy yellow threads in a rolled leaf over a lenticular or spherical egg mass 5–12 mm (0.20–0.47 in) in diameter, which may contain up to 1,000 eggs. Juveniles are frequently preyed upon by mud daubers.[5]

Synonyms[edit]

N. crucifera has also been known by a number of taxonomic synonyms.[1][2]

  • Aranea crucifera albimaculata Strand, 1908
  • Epeira crucifera Keyserling, 1864
  • Epeira domiciliorum Emerton, 1884
  • Epeira hentzii Keyserling 1864
  • Epeira lentiginosa Blackwall 1862
  • Neoscona arkansa Chamberlin & Ivie, 1942
  • Neoscona benjamina Comstock 1940
  • Neoscona hentzi Kaston 1977
  • Neoscona nebraskensis Chamberlin & Ivie, 1942
  • Neoscona sacra Chamberlin & Ivie, 1944

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Hentz's orbweaver". University of Arkansas. Retrieved September 11, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b "Neoscona crucifera". Zipcode Zoo. Retrieved September 11, 2010. 
  3. ^ G. B. Edwards, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Plant Industry. "Orb Weavers". Retrieved September 11, 2010. 
  4. ^ B. J. Kaston (1976). "Supplement to the Spiders of Connecticut" (PDF). Journal of Arachnology 4 (1): 1–72. 
  5. ^ B. J. Kaston (1948). "Spiders of Connecticut". Bulletin of the Connecticut State Geological and Natural History Survey 70: 1–874.