Nervous System

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[1] Nervous system

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The Nervous System is the part of the body that controls voluntary and involuntary actions and transmits the signals from the brain to different parts of the body. The Nervous System consists of two major parts, the Central Nervous System and the Peripheral Nervous System. The Central Nervous System (CNS) contains the brain and spinal cord, while the Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) consists of mostly nerves that connect to the CNS.

At the cellular level, the nervous system is defined by the presence of a special type of cell, called the neuron, also known as a "nerve cell". Neurons have special structures that allow them to send signals rapidly and precisely to other cells. They send these signals in the form of electrochemical waves traveling along thin fibers called axons, which cause chemicals called neurotransmitters to be released at junctions called synapses.

Nervous systems are found in most multicellular animals, but vary greatly in complexity.[1] The only multicellular animals that have no nervous system at all are sponges, placozoans, and mesozoans, which have very simple body plans. The nervous systems of the radially symmetric organisms ctenophores (comb jellies) and cnidarians (which include anemones, hydras, corals and jellyfish) consist of a diffuse nerve net. All other animal species, with the exception of a few types of worm, have a nervous system containing a brain, a central cord (or two cords running in parallel), and nerves radiating from the brain and central cord. The size of the nervous system ranges from a few hundred cells in the simplest worms, to around 100 billion cells in humans.