Netcong, New Jersey

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Netcong, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Netcong
Motto: All Roads Lead To Netcong[1]
Netcong highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Netcong highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Netcong, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Netcong, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°53′52″N 74°42′06″W / 40.897852°N 74.701704°W / 40.897852; -74.701704Coordinates: 40°53′52″N 74°42′06″W / 40.897852°N 74.701704°W / 40.897852; -74.701704[2][3]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated October 23, 1894
Named for Musconetcong River
Government[7]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Joseph A. Nametko (term ends December 31, 2015)[4]
 • Administrator Ralph Blakeslee[5]
 • Clerk Cynthia L. Eckert[6]
Area[3]
 • Total 0.917 sq mi (2.376 km2)
 • Land 0.844 sq mi (2.187 km2)
 • Water 0.073 sq mi (0.190 km2)  7.99%
Area rank 511th of 566 in state
38th of 39 in county[3]
Elevation[8] 906 ft (276 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 3,232
 • Estimate (2012[12]) 3,268
 • Rank 443rd of 566 in state
37th of 39 in county[13]
 • Density 3,828.4/sq mi (1,478.2/km2)
 • Density rank 162nd of 566 in state
4th of 39 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07857[14][15]
Area code(s) 973 exchanges: 347, 426, 448, 691[16]
FIPS code 3402750130[17][3][18]
GNIS feature ID 0885316[19][3]
Website www.netcong.org

Netcong is a borough in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 3,232,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 652 (+25.3%) from the 2,580 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 731 (-22.1%) from the 3,311 counted in the 1990 Census.[20] Netcong lies on the shores of Lake Musconetcong.

Netcong was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on October 23, 1894, from portions of both Mount Olive Township and Roxbury Township, based on the results of a referendum held the previous day.[21]

Geography[edit]

Netcong is located at 40°53′52″N 74°42′06″W / 40.897852°N 74.701704°W / 40.897852; -74.701704 (40.897852,-74.701704). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.917 square miles (2.376 km2), of which, 0.844 square miles (2.187 km2) of it was land and 0.073 square miles (0.190 km2) of it (7.99%) was water.[2]

Netcong borders Mount Olive Township, Roxbury Township, and Stanhope.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 941
1910 1,532 62.8%
1920 1,800 17.5%
1930 2,097 16.5%
1940 2,157 2.9%
1950 2,284 5.9%
1960 2,765 21.1%
1970 2,858 3.4%
1980 3,557 24.5%
1990 3,311 −6.9%
2000 2,580 −22.1%
2010 3,232 25.3%
Est. 2012 3,268 [12] 1.1%
Population sources: 1900-1920[22]
1900-1910[23] 1910-1930[24]
1930-1990[25] 2000[26][27] 2010[9][10][11]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 3,232 people, 1,381 households, and 810.6 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,828.4 per square mile (1,478.2 /km2). There were 1,449 housing units at an average density of 1,716.4 per square mile (662.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 84.22% (2,722) White, 3.90% (126) Black or African American, 0.34% (11) Native American, 2.78% (90) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 6.71% (217) from other races, and 2.04% (66) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 17.70% (572) of the population.[9]

There were 1,381 households, of which 23.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.7% were married couples living together, 11.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.3% were non-families. 32.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.99.[9]

In the borough, 18.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.8% from 18 to 24, 29.9% from 25 to 44, 29.0% from 45 to 64, and 13.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.1 years. For every 100 females there were 97.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.5 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $59,167 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,354) and the median family income was $72,222 (+/- $9,501). Males had a median income of $64,569 (+/- $6,401) versus $46,094 (+/- $3,857) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $32,135 (+/- $3,825). About 7.8% of families and 7.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.3% of those under age 18 and 4.6% of those age 65 or over.[28]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 2,580 people, 1,008 households, and 681 families residing in the town. The population density was 3,066.8 people per square mile (1,185.9/km2). There were 1,043 housing units at an average density of 1,239.8 per square mile (479.4/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 94.30% White, 1.20% African American, 0.04% Native American, 1.67% Asian, 1.43% from other races, and 1.36% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.13% of the population.[26][27]

There were 1,008 households out of which 30.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.3% were married couples living together, 11.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.4% were non-families. 26.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.10.[26][27]

In the borough the population was spread out with 23.0% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 32.7% from 25 to 44, 22.5% from 45 to 64, and 14.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 96.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.5 males.[26][27]

The median income for a household in the borough was $55,000, and the median income for a family was $65,833. Males had a median income of $42,179 versus $36,458 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $23,472. About 2.5% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.2% of those under age 18 and 5.4% of those age 65 or over.[26][27]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Netcong is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at large. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[7]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Netcong is Republican Joseph A. Nametko, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. Members of the Borough Council (with party affiliation, term-end year and committee chairmanship listed in parentheses, where available) are Council President Edward Koster (R, 2015), Patricia Butler (R, 2012), Robert Hathaway (D, 2013), Cecilia G. Laureys (R, 2013; Public Services), Elmer M. Still (R, 2014; Finance) and John “Jack” Sylvester, Jr. (R, 2014; Public Safety).[29][30]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Netcong is located in the 7th Congressional District[31] and is part of New Jersey's 25th state legislative district.[10][32][33] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Netcong had been in the 24th state legislative district.[34] Prior to the 2010 Census, Netcong had been part of the 11th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[34]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[35] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[36][37] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[38][39]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 25th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Anthony Bucco (R, Boonton Town) and in the General Assembly by Tony Bucco (R, Boonton Township) and Michael Patrick Carroll (R, Morris Township).[40][41] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[42] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[43]

Morris County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year.[44] As of 2011, Morris County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director William J. Chegwidden (Wharton),[45] Deputy Freeholder Director Douglas R. Cabana (Boonton Township),[46] Gene F. Feyl (Denville),[47] Ann F. Grassi (Parsippany-Troy Hills),[48] Thomas J. Mastrangelo (Montville),[49] John J. Murphy (Morris Township)[50] and Hank Lyon (Montville Township),[51][52]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 1,754 registered voters in Netcong, of which 385 (21.9%) were registered as Democrats, 654 (37.3%) were registered as Republicans and 715 (40.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[53]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 56.3% of the vote here (751 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 42.1% (561 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (13 votes), among the 1,334 ballots cast by the borough's 1,822 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.2%.[54] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 62.3% of the vote here (778 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 36.5% (456 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (10 votes), among the 1,249 ballots cast by the borough's 1,784 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 70.0.[55]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 59.0% of the vote here (543 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 30.3% (279 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 8.9% (82 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (8 votes), among the 921 ballots cast by the borough's 1,787 registered voters, yielding a 51.5% turnout.[56]

History[edit]

Netcong received its name from the Musconetcong River, named by the Lenape Native Americans and meaning "grass creek", "swamp stream" or "rapid stream".[57] Along with the river, the proximity of the old Morris and Sussex Turnpike, which passed through the region shortly after 1801, and the coming of the Morris Canal, in 1831, made the site a favorable one for development.

After becoming a Borough, the residents had to elect the first Governing Body. The first Mayor was Abraham J. Drake, elected November 14, 1894. A census of Netcong taken July 1895 showed a population of 877 people.[22]

Netcong derived much of its business from the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad, which had its last stop in Morris County in the heart of the Borough. The DL&W's Sussex Branch to Branchville also stopped at Netcong Station, with the Sussex Branch coming into the opposite side of the station from where New Jersey Transit's line is today. The big railroad roundhouse in Port Morris also supplied many jobs for the town residents.[58]

Transportation[edit]

NJ Transit operates weekday rail service between the Netcong station[59] and Hoboken Terminal, with service to Penn Station in New York City via Midtown Direct on the Montclair-Boonton Line and the Morristown Line.[60][61]

NJ Transit used to provide local service on the MCM5 route.[62] Nowadays, the Morris County Department of Transportation provides bus service along Route 46 to Dover and Mount Olive.[63]

In view of Netcong's rich railroad history, the town has been named as a site for the New Jersey State Railroad and Transportation Museum (jointly with Phillipsburg). Given that the site envisioned for this museum in Phillipsburg has been sold for development as a townhouse complex and college campus annex, it is unclear what role Phillipsburg will play in this museum. Funding will need to be secured in order to build and operate this museum.[64]

Several major highways pass through Netcong, leading to the borough's motto of "All Roads Lead to Netcong".[1] Major roadways in Netcong include Interstate 80 (the Bergen-Passaic Expressway),[65] U.S. Route 46 and Route 183, the latter two highways meeting at the Netcong Circle.[66] The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) uses Netcong as a control city on directional signage on its highways throughout northern New Jersey, and as far away as the George Washington Bridge, even though less than one-tenth of a mile of Interstate 80 is in the borough (from mile markers 26.33 to 26.42).[65][67] Interstate 80 and U.S. Route 206 intersect with U.S. Route 46 in the southwest corner of the borough at Exit 26.

In 2007, the New Jersey Department of Transportation proposed the elimination of the Netcong Traffic Circle, located at the intersections of U.S. Route 46 and Route 183 just north of the interchange with Interstate 80, and its replacement with a signalized intersection. The circle itself dated back to construction in 1938 and was unable to handle the 17,000 vehicles a year that used the large roadway daily. The circle was the frequent site of vehicular accidents, including a total of 81 in 2007 and 2008.[68] The project had issues dealing with the vertical clearance of the overpass for U.S. Route 46 westbound. The removal of the circle would eliminate this bridge, and the land would go to use as the new signalized intersection, with pedestrian and bicycle fittings. The entire project cost about $13.3 million of state and local funds to construct.[69] A temporary interchange was implemented in January 2013, with the permanent intersection configuration completed that August.[70]

Education[edit]

Netcong is home to the Netcong School District, which serves public school students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade. Netcong Elementary School had an enrollment of 286 students as of the 2010-11 school year.[71]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend Lenape Valley Regional High School, which serves Netcong and the Sussex County communities of Byram Township and Stanhope.[72] As of the 2010-11 school year, the school had an enrollment of 825 students.[73]

St. Michael School is a Catholic school operated under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson, that was founded in 1923, and staffed by the Sisters of Christian Charity of Mendham starting in 1945.[74][75]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Netcong include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Staff. "Netcong", Daily Record (Morristown), June 17, 2007. Accessed October 24, 2013. "Borough theme: 'All Roads Lead to Netcong'"
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  4. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  5. ^ Administration, Netcong Borough. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  6. ^ Borough Clerk, Netcong Borough. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 110.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Netcong, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Netcong borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 14, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 12. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Netcong borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed May 14, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Netcong, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Netcong, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  17. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  19. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  21. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 195. Accessed May 14, 2012.
  22. ^ a b Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  23. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed May 14, 2012.
  24. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed May 14, 2012.
  25. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed May 14, 2012.
  26. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Netcong borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  27. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Netcong borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 7, 2012.
  28. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Netcong borough, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  29. ^ Mayor & Council, Borough of Netcong. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  30. ^ Morris County Manual 2013, p. 52. Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  31. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  32. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 61, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  33. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  34. ^ a b 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 61, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  35. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  36. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  37. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  38. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  39. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  40. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  41. ^ District 25 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  42. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  43. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  44. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2011.
  45. ^ William J. Chegwidden, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  46. ^ Douglas R. Cabana, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  47. ^ Gene F. Feyl, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  48. ^ Ann F. Grossi, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  49. ^ Thomas J. Mastrangelo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  50. ^ John J. Murphy, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  51. ^ Hank Lyon, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  52. ^ Meet the Freeholders, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2011.
  53. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Morris, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  54. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  55. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  56. ^ 2009 Governor: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  57. ^ Netcong, New Jersey community profile, Epodunk. Accessed November 5, 2007.
  58. ^ Netcong: A Brief History, accessed August 3, 2006
  59. ^ Netcong station, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  60. ^ Montclair-Boonton Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  61. ^ Morristown Line, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  62. ^ Morris County Bus Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  63. ^ http://www.morrisdot.org/bus/MOM_timetable.pdf
  64. ^ Borough of Netcong, Morris County Tourism. Accessed October 24, 2013. "With Netcong's rich railroad history, the town has been named as a site for the NJ State Railroad and Transportation Museum."
  65. ^ a b Interstate 80 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  66. ^ U.S. Route 46 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  67. ^ Daigle, Michael. "You Can't Miss the Signs", Daily Record (Morristown), April 24, 2001. Accessed October 24, 2013. "State Department of Transportation spokesman John Dourgarian said history and the crossroads of several major highways keeps Netcong's name on highway signs even though it has been eclipsed in size and population by neighboring Mount Olive and Roxbury."
  68. ^ Drobness, Tanya. "Netcong Circle in Morris County near end of road", The Star-Ledger, April 5, 2009. Accessed October 24, 2013. "There was a time when a few cars at a time would easily maneuver around the Netcong Circle, built about 70 years ago.But these days, about 17,000 vehicles crisscross in and around the complex circle daily, and its archaic design has for years been unable to handle the increasing volume of traffic, according to New Jersey Department of Transportation officials.... In 2007, there were 45 accidents at the circle, accounting for 30 percent of all accidents in the borough that year, followed by 36 accidents in 2008, according to Netcong Police Department data."
  69. ^ FY 2007-10 STATEWIDE TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  70. ^ Staff. "Netcong Circle construction project advances with opening of new intersection", Daily Record (Morristown), August 5, 2013. Accessed October 24, 2013. "The newly reconfigured intersection of Routes 46 and 183 opened this weekend as construction to the Netcong Circle continues to advance, according to state Department of Transportation officials.A temporary traffic pattern, with temporary traffic signals and striping plans, had been in place at the intersection since January, when the out-dated traffic circle had been removed, according to a news release."
  71. ^ Data for the Netcong Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 20, 2012.
  72. ^ Maldonado, Stacy. "Lenape Valley budget presented to public", The Township Journal, April 4, 2012. Accessed October 24, 2013. "The Lenape Valley Board of Education presented their budget for the 2012-13 school year at their March 28 meeting, which was open to the public.... The proposed budget means that for every $100 of assessed home value in Byram, school taxes will rise by $0.02, and $0.01 in Netcong, but decrease by $0.02 in Stanhope."
  73. ^ Data for Lenape Valley Regional High School, United States Department of Education. Accessed February 18, 2013.
  74. ^ History, St. Michael School. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  75. ^ Morris County Elementary / Secondary Schools, Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson. Accessed October 24, 2013.
  76. ^ "RNC Chairman Priebus touts his Jersey cred", Asbury Park Press Capitol Quickies, August 30, 2012. Accessed November 8, 2012. "“I have something in common I think a little bit with you all, I was born in New Jersey,” Reince Priebus told New Jersey Republicans at their delegation breakfast. “I was born in Dover, and some of my favorite childhood memories … we moved when I was seven to Wisconsin, but I still remember very fondly, and I think about it, was growing up in Netcong. That’s where I grew up.”"

External links[edit]