Nevada State Route 28

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State Route 28 marker

State Route 28
Tahoe Boulevard, Lakeshore Boulevard
Route information
Maintained by NDOT
Length: 16.174 mi[3] (26.030 km)
Existed: 1948 – present
Tourist
routes:
Lake Tahoe - Eastshore Drive[1]
North Shore Road[2]
Major junctions
South end: US 50 near Glenbrook
  SR 431 in Incline Village
North end: SR 28 at Kings Beach, CA
Location
Counties: Douglas, Carson City, Washoe
Highway system

Nevada State Routes

I‑15 US 50

State Route 28 (SR 28) is a 16.2-mile (26.1 km) road that runs along the northeastern shore of Lake Tahoe. SR 28 starts at US 50 and ends at the California state line at Crystal Bay, continuing across the border as SR 28. The highway is one of three Nevada state routes to continue into California with the same number, the others being SR 88 and SR 266. SR 28 is part of the National Scenic Byway system since September 1996, and the state scenic byway system since June 1994.

The highway serves Douglas County and Washoe County as well as a rural part of Carson City. SR 28 was designated in 1948, and has not significantly changed since it was first paved.

Route description[edit]

Rest area along SR 28 with view of Lake Tahoe and Incline Village

SR 28 begins at U.S. Route 50 (US 50) in Douglas County, Nevada.[4] It heads north from there, forming part of the boundary of Lake Tahoe – Nevada State Park until crossing into Carson City. The highway then enters Washoe County, where the highway enters Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest. It then turns northwest, running through Incline Village.[4] In western Incline Village, SR 28 junctions with SR 431, which is a direct link to Reno to the northeast. Just short of the California state line, it turns south to run parallel to the line and finally crosses into California at Crystal Bay. The road continues west of the California border as California State Route 28.[4]

The route has been designated as the north piece of the Lake Tahoe–Eastshore Drive Scenic Byway, as part of the National Scenic Byway program.[1] SR 28 was also designated as a state scenic byway.[2] SR 28 is not part of the National Highway System.[5] Around 11,300 cars use SR 28 on average each day.[6]

History[edit]

Lake Tahoe at sunset as seen from SR 28

The road that became SR 28 was paved around 1932,[7] and has been used for flumes in the timber industry since 1880.[8] The route first appeared in 1948,[9] with the same general alignment as it has today.[10] The highway gained fame for many years as the location of the Ponderosa Ranch, filming location of the television series Bonanza.[11] On June 7, 1994, the Nevada Department of Transportation (NDOT) designated SR 28 as a scenic byway, named North Shore Road.[2] Later in September 1996, SR 28 and part of US 50 was designated as Lake Tahoe - Eastshore Drive, a National Scenic Byway.[1]

Major intersections[edit]

Note: Mileposts in Nevada reset at county lines; the start and end mileposts for each county are given in the county column.
County Location Mile
[3][4][12]
km Destinations Notes
Douglas
0.00–1.23
  0.00 0.00 US 50 – Carson City, Stateline
Carson City
0.00–3.95
No major junctions
Washoe
0.00–10.99
Incline Village 4.98 8.01 Lakeshore Boulevard
8.08 13.00 SR 431 (Mount Rose Highway) – Reno A roundabout
Crystal Bay 10.99 17.69 SR 28 – Tahoe City
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Lake Tahoe – Eastshore Drive". U.S. Department of Transportation National Scenic Byways Program. Retrieved 2013-07-30. 
  2. ^ a b c "Nevada's Scenic Byways". Nevada Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2013-07-31. 
  3. ^ a b "Nevada's State Maintained Highways: Descriptions, Index and Maps". Nevada Department of Transportation. 2013. Retrieved 2013-12-26. 
  4. ^ a b c d Google Inc. "Nevada State Route 28". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://www.google.com/maps?q=Nevada+State+Route+28&hl=en&sll=39.171782,-119.960518&sspn=0.420538,0.891953&hnear=Nevada+28,+Nevada&t=m&z=12. Retrieved 2013-07-30.
  5. ^ Federal Highway Administration (March 2013) (PDF). National Highway System: Nevada (Map). http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/national_highway_system/nhs_maps/nevada/nv_nevada.pdf. Retrieved 2013-07-30.
  6. ^ "2012 Annual Traffic Report". Nevada Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2013-07-30. 
  7. ^ Nevada Department of Highways (1932). 1932 Map of Nevada (Map). Cartography by Nevada Department of Highways. http://contentdm.library.unr.edu/cdm4/document.php?CISOROOT=/hmaps&CISOPTR=569&REC=10. Retrieved 2013-07-31.
  8. ^ "The Great Incline of the Sierra Nevada". State of Nevada, State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2013-07-30. 
  9. ^ Nevada Department of Highways (1948). 1948 Map of Nevada (Map). Cartography by Nevada Department of Highways. http://www.nevadadot.com/uploadedFiles/NDOT/Traveler_Info/Maps/1948HwyMapDuplexWeb.pdf. Retrieved 2013-07-29.
  10. ^ Nevada Department of Transportation. Official Nevada State Map (Map). Cartography by Nevada Department of Transportation. Lake Tahoe inset. http://www.nevadadot.com/uploadedFiles/NDOT/Traveler_Info/Maps/NDOT%20Highway%20Map%202013-2014.pdf. Retrieved 2013-07-29.
  11. ^ Google Inc. "Ponderosa Ranch". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Ponderosa+Ranch,+Ponderosa+Ranch+Road,+Incline+Village,+NV&hl=en&sll=40.113478,-83.145924&sspn=0.207425,0.445976&oq=Ponderosa+Ranch,In&hq=Ponderosa+Ranch,+Ponderosa+Ranch+Road,+Incline+Village,+NV&t=m&z=15. Retrieved 2013-07-29.
  12. ^ Nevada Department of Transportation (2013). "2013 Nevada State Maintained Highways, Descriptions, Index and Maps". Retrieved 2013-07-30. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Google / Bing