Neville Bowles Chamberlain

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Sir Neville Bowles Chamberlain
Neville Bowles Chamberlain.jpg
Sir Neville Bowles Chamberlain
Born 10 January 1820
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Died 3 February 1902 (aged 82)
Lordswood, Hampshire
Allegiance United Kingdom United Kingdom
Service/branch British Raj Red Ensign.svg Indian Army
Years of service 1837 - 1886
Rank Field Marshal
Commands held Madras Army
Battles/wars First Anglo-Afghan War
Gwalior Campaign
Second Anglo-Sikh War
Indian Rebellion
Second Anglo-Afghan War
Awards Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath
Knight Grand Commander of the Order of the Star of India

Field Marshal Sir Neville Bowles Chamberlain GCB GCSI (10 January 1820 – 17 February 1902) was a senior Indian Army officer. He fought at the Battle of Ghazni in July 1839 during the First Anglo-Afghan War, the Battle of Maharajpur in December 1843 during the Gwalior Campaign and the Battle of Chillianwala in January 1849 and the Battle of Gujrat in February 1849 during the Second Anglo-Sikh War. During the Indian Rebellion he served as Adjutant-General of the Indian Army and was severely wounded at the Siege of Delhi in July 1857. He went on to be Commander-in-chief of the Madras Army in February 1876 and was sent on a mission to the Emir of Afghanistan, Sher Ali Khan, whose refusal to allow him to enter the country precipitated the Second Anglo-Afghan War in November 1878.

Military career[edit]

Chamberlain was born the third son of Sir Henry Chamberlain, 1st Baronet, consul general and charge d'affaires in Brazil, and his second wife Anna Eugenia née Morgan.[1] His elder brother, William Charles Chamberlain, was an admiral, while younger brothers Crawford Chamberlain, and Charles Francis Falcon Chamberlain, were also army officers.[1]

Chamberlain initially entered the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich but was withdrawn after a year and was commissioned as an ensign in the Bengal Native Infantry on 24 February 1837.[2] He fought at the Battle of Ghazni in July 1839 as well as other engagements during the First Anglo-Afghan War and was wounded on several occasions.[3][4] Promoted to lieutenant on 16 July 1842, he transferred to the 1st Cavalry of Shah Shujah's Contingent and took part in a march from Kandahar to Kabul in August 1842.[5] During the withdrawal from Kabul he was again wounded at Landi Kotal in October 1842 and again at Ali Masjid in November 1842.[2] He became attached to the Governor-General's Bodyguard in January 1843 and took part in the Battle of Maharajpur in December 1843 during the Gwalior Campaign.[2]

Chamberlain became military secretary to the Governor of Bombay in late 1846 and then brigade major with the Bengal Irregular Cavalry in 1848.[6] He took part in the Battle of Chillianwala in January 1849 and the Battle of Gujrat in February 1849 during the Second Anglo-Sikh War.[6] He became assistant adjutant-general of the Sirhind division in May 1849 and, having been promoted to captain in the 16th Bengal Native Infantry on 1 November 1849 and to brevet major on 2 November 1849,[7] he became assistant commissioner in the Rawalpindi District in December 1849 and then assistant commissioner in the Hazara District in June 1850.[1] Promoted to lieutenant-colonel on 28 November 1854, he was given the command of the Punjab Irregular Frontier Force and led several expeditions against the frontier tribes.[6] During the Indian Rebellion he served as Adjutant-General of the Indian Army and was severely wounded at the Siege of Delhi in July 1857.[8] For this he was appointed a Companion of the Order of the Bath on 11 November 1857[9] and promoted to colonel on 27 November 1857.[10]

Chamberlain was reappointed to the command of the Punjab Irregular Frontier Force in 1858 and led it during the Ambela Campaign during which he was again severely wounded again in November 1863.[6] Advanced to Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath on 11 April 1863,[11] he returned to the United Kingdom and was promoted to major-general for distinguished service on 5 August 1864.[12] He was appointed a Knight Commander of the Order of the Star of India on 24 May 1866 and accompanied the Duke of Edinburgh on an official trip to India in 1869.[1] He was promoted to lieutenant-general on 1 May 1872,[13][14] advanced to Knight Grand Commander of the Order of the Star of India on 24 May 1873[15] and further advanced to Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath on 28 May 1875.[16]

Chamberlain became Commander-in-chief of the Madras Army in February 1876 and, having been promoted to full general on 1 October 1877,[17] was sent on a mission to the Emir of Afghanistan, Sher Ali Khan, whose refusal to allow him to enter the country precipitated the Second Anglo-Afghan War in November 1878.[6] He was a member of the Madras Legislative Council and, for several months, acting military member of the council of the Governor-General of India.[18] He left India in February 1881 and retired to Lordswood near Southampton in February 1886.[19]

In retirement Chamberlain was an active member of the Southampton Unitarian Church.[20] He was promoted to field marshal on 25 April 1900, died at Lordswood on the 17 February 1902[21] and was buried at Rownhams near Southampton.[6]

Family[edit]

In 1873 Chamberlain married Charlotte Cuyler Reid, daughter of Major-General Sir William Reid, who died in 1896; there were no children.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Chamberlain, Neville Bowles". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Retrieved 6 October 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c Heathcote, p. 83
  3. ^ The London Gazette: no. 20136. p. 2395. 6 September 1842. Retrieved 6 October 2013.
  4. ^ The London Gazette: no. 20136. p. 2397. 6 September 1842. Retrieved 6 October 2013.
  5. ^ The London Gazette: no. 20168. p. 3410. 24 November 1842. Retrieved 6 October 2013.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g Heathcote, p. 84
  7. ^ The London Gazette: no. 21048. p. 3766. 11 December 1849. Retrieved 6 October 2013.
  8. ^ The London Gazette: no. 22095. p. 673. 10 February 1858. Retrieved 6 October 2013.
  9. ^ The London Gazette: no. 22064. p. 3851. 17 November 1857. Retrieved 6 October 2013.
  10. ^ The London Gazette: no. 22828. p. 1347. 4 March 1864. Retrieved 6 October 2013.
  11. ^ The London Gazette: no. 22727. p. 2069. 17 April 1863. Retrieved 6 October 2013.
  12. ^ The London Gazette: no. 23130. p. 3653. 26 June 1866. Retrieved 6 October 2013.
  13. ^ The London Gazette: no. 23865. p. 2667. 7 June 1872. Retrieved 6 October 2013.
  14. ^ The London Gazette: no. 23876. p. 3196. 16 July 1872. Retrieved 6 October 2013.
  15. ^ The London Gazette: no. 23979. p. 2584. 24 May 1873. Retrieved 6 October 2013.
  16. ^ The London Gazette: no. 24213. p. 2851. 29 May 1875. Retrieved 6 October 2013.
  17. ^ The London Gazette: no. 24552. p. 750. 15 February 1878. Retrieved 6 October 2013.
  18. ^ The London Gazette: no. 24276. p. 6467. 17 December 1875. Retrieved 6 October 2013.
  19. ^ The London Gazette: no. 25564. p. 1029. 2 March 1886. Retrieved 6 October 2013.
  20. ^ "Field Marshal Sir Neville Chamberlain". Unitarian Universalist Association. Retrieved 6 October 2013. 
  21. ^ "Death of Sir Neville Chamberlain" The Times (London). Wednesday, 19 February 1902. (36695), p. 10.

Sources[edit]

  • Heathcote, Anthony (1999). The British Field Marshals 1736 - 1997. ISBN 0-85052-696-5. 
Military offices
Preceded by
Sir Frederick Haines
C-in-C, Madras Army
1876–1880
Succeeded by
Sir Frederick Roberts