New Baltimore, Virginia

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New Baltimore
Census-designated place (CDP)
New Baltimore is located in Virginia
New Baltimore
New Baltimore
Location within the Commonwealth of Virginia
Coordinates: 38°46′02″N 77°43′42″W / 38.76722°N 77.72833°W / 38.76722; -77.72833Coordinates: 38°46′02″N 77°43′42″W / 38.76722°N 77.72833°W / 38.76722; -77.72833
Country United States
State Virginia
County Fauquier
Population (2010)
 • Total 8,119
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)

New Baltimore, Virginia is a census-designated place (CDP) in eastern Fauquier County, Virginia, United States. The population as of the 2010 Census was 8,119.[1] Although the CDP has existed since the early 19th century, it has had its most significant growth since the 1980s. It is the portion of Fauquier County with the easiest access to Washington, DC and, as a result, many people who live in New Baltimore commute into DC. Other major communities close to New Baltimore are Warrenton, Gainesville/Haymarket area, and Manassas. The area officially considered to be New Baltimore expanded significantly in 2006 with Fauquier County's designation of service districts, of which New Baltimore is one. The service district designation provides added access to utilities such as water and sewer, and targets the area for growth.

The original New Baltimore is northwest of and slightly off the highway from what is generally currently considered New Baltimore. It was a thriving early 19th century community which is now only a shadow of its past. The original New Baltimore was an incorporated town dependent on what was then known as Alexandria Turnpike, now known as Lee Highway, which went right through it. In the 1850s it was a post village with a church and a school.[2] Its postmaster's salary was $19 in 1870.[3] The U.S. Post Office listed it in 1897, but not in 1908.[4][5] When Lee Highway was routed around New Baltimore in the early 20th century, the town became just an enclave of houses from varying periods. The original central point of the town, James Hampton's Tavern, built 1823, still stands at the intersection of Old Alexandria Turnpike and Georgetown Road. It is currently a private residence. The New Baltimore Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2004.[6]

New Baltimore is two miles southwest of the border of Prince William County and Fauquier County. It is one mile north of Broken Hill, 4 miles east of Warrenton, and 6 miles west of Gainesville, Virginia.

The major road in the community is Lee Highway, U.S. Route 15/29. Also Beverley's Mill Road / Broad Run Church Road (County Route 600), which technically a secondary road, is another well-traveled commuter road in the community.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Virginia Trend Report 2: State and Complete Places (Sub-state 2010 Census Data). Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed 2011-06-08.
  2. ^ Edwards, Richard, ed. (1855). Statistical Gazetteer of the State of Virginia: Embracing Important Topographical and Historical Information from Recent and Original Sources, Together with the Results of the Last Census Population, in Most Cases, to 1854. Richmond, Virginia. p. 321. Retrieved 2014-01-02. "NEW BALTIMORE, a post village of Fauquier county, Virginia, 105 miles N by W. from Richmond, has 1 church and 1 academy."  This work describes a place as a county, city, town, post office, post village, small post village, village, or small village - sometimes with an adjective such as handsome, beautiful, or thriving.
  3. ^ United States. Post Office Department (1870). "List of post offices in the United States (arranged alphabetically) with the salaries of the postmasters". List of Post Offices in the United States. Washington: Government Printing Office. p. 137. Retrieved 2014-01-02. 
  4. ^ United States. Post Office Department (1897). "List of post offices in the United States, arranged alphabetically". United States Official Postal Guide. New York, New York: Metropolitan Job Print. pp. 187, 513. Retrieved 2014-01-02. 
  5. ^ "List of post offices in the United States, arranged alphabetically". United States Official Postal Guide. Albany, New York: J. B. Lyon Company, Printers. July 1908. p. 248. Retrieved 2014-01-02. 
  6. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09.  This work designates a place as county, city, town, post office, post village, small post village, or village.