New Carlisle, Ohio

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New Carlisle, Ohio
City
Location of New Carlisle, Ohio
Location of New Carlisle, Ohio
Coordinates: 39°56′25″N 84°1′47″W / 39.94028°N 84.02972°W / 39.94028; -84.02972Coordinates: 39°56′25″N 84°1′47″W / 39.94028°N 84.02972°W / 39.94028; -84.02972
Country United States
State Ohio
County Clark
Area[1]
 • Total 2.76 sq mi (7.15 km2)
 • Land 2.74 sq mi (7.10 km2)
 • Water 0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation [2] 899 ft (274 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 5,785
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 5,737
 • Density 2,111.3/sq mi (815.2/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 45344
Area code(s) 937
FIPS code 39-54334[5]
GNIS feature ID 1065113[2]
Website http://www.newcarlisleohio.net

New Carlisle is a city in Clark County, Ohio, United States. The population was 5,785 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Springfield, Ohio Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Geography[edit]

New Carlisle is located at 39°56′25″N 84°1′47″W / 39.94028°N 84.02972°W / 39.94028; -84.02972 (39.940314, -84.029634).[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.76 square miles (7.15 km2), of which, 2.74 square miles (7.10 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water.[1]

The census-designated place of Park Layne is adjacent to New Carlisle.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 818
1890 958 17.1%
1900 995 3.9%
1910 1,058 6.3%
1920 1,019 −3.7%
1930 1,089 6.9%
1940 1,237 13.6%
1950 1,640 32.6%
1960 4,107 150.4%
1970 6,112 48.8%
1980 6,498 6.3%
1990 6,049 −6.9%
2000 5,735 −5.2%
2010 5,785 0.9%
Est. 2012 5,737 −0.8%
Sources:[7][8][9][10][11][5][12]

The median income for a household in the city was $39,081, and the median income for a family was $43,320. Males had a median income of $33,413 versus $21,449 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,490. About 9.4% of families and 11.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.4% of those under age 18 and 9.0% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 5,785 people, 2,214 households, and 1,489 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,111.3 inhabitants per square mile (815.2 /km2). There were 2,389 housing units at an average density of 871.9 per square mile (336.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 90.1% White, 0.5% African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 7.6% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.3% of the population.

There were 2,214 households of which 35.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.1% were married couples living together, 14.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 32.7% were non-families. 27.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 14% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.12.

The median age in the city was 36.2 years. 26% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25.7% were from 25 to 44; 24.3% were from 45 to 64; and 14.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.7% male and 52.3% female.

History[edit]

New Carlisle was established in 1810 and incorporated as an Ohio city in 1973.[13]

New Carlisle was the birthplace of General Frederick Funston.[13]

On June 21, 1933, the infamous John Dillinger committed his first bank robbery, taking $10,000 from the New Carlisle National Bank, which occupied the building which still stands at the southeast corner of Main Street and Jefferson Street (state routes 235 and 571) in New Carlisle.[14][15]

Media[edit]

The community was portrayed as the hometown location of the fictional Babs Knievans' Bar and Grill and "Hiney Wine" used as a daily comedy sketch and mock radio ad by local radio personalities John King and Terry Dorsey on Dayton radio station WING (AM) in the 1980s.

Radio ads invited listeners to visit the "Hiney Winery, a block and a bridge past beautiful downtown New Carlisle!"

Schools[edit]

New Carlisle is in the Tecumseh Local School District, formerly known as New Carlisle-Bethel Local District. Part of New Carlisle is still annexed to Bethel Local Schools in Miami County.

Churches[edit]

New Carlisle has many churches. It is home to First Baptist Church of New Carlisle, New Carlisle Church of Christ, Sacred Heart Catholic Church, New Carlisle Methodist Church, Park Layne Church of God, New Carlisle Church of the Nazarene, New Carlisle Church of the Brethren, Lake Avenue Christian Church and many others. Many New Carlisle churches offer free hot meals on certain days of the week. For example, the New Carlisle Church of the Brethren offers a free meal every Wednesday from 5 p.m. until 6:30 p.m.

Notable natives and residents[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties". Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  8. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  9. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  10. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio". 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  11. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  12. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  13. ^ a b http://www.newcarlisleareachamberofcommerce.com/community.html
  14. ^ Dayton (Ohio) Daily News, 21 June 1933, 1933, pages 1 & 5.
  15. ^ "New Carlisle," 6 Feb. 2013 (rev. 31 Jan. 2014), Dayton Daily News Archive (blog), Wright State University Special Collections & Archives, http://www.libraries.wright.edu/special/ddn_archive/2013/02/06/new-carlisle/.
  16. ^ "Wayne Embry on Basketball-reference.com". Sports Reference LLC. 
  17. ^ Grasso, John (2010). Historical Dictionary of Basketball (Google eBook). Lanham, Maryland: Scarecrow Press. p. 127. Retrieved 7 May 2014. 
  18. ^ Babb, J.G.D. "Funston, Frederick". Encyclopedia of American Military Hostory. 
  19. ^ Wong, Wayman (1 March 2005). "MAKING HIS MARK IN ‘ALTAR BOYZ’". New York, New York: Playbill, Inc. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  20. ^ "Spanky McFarland". JMUSports.com. James Madison Athletics Communications. Archived from the original on July 25, 2014. Retrieved July 25, 2014. 
  21. ^ "Inventor of the Week: Roy J. Plunkett". Massachusetts Institute of Technology. July 2000. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  22. ^ "Interview with Roy J. Plunkett". Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Chemical Heritage Foundation. 1986. Retrieved 8 May 2014. 
  23. ^ Hurst, Jack (21 July 1978). "Margo Smith Still Feels Like Unknown" (Google News). Wilmington Morning Star (Wilmington, North Carolina): 8–B. 
  24. ^ Fox, Marian (27 February 1976). Margo Smith Waited for Stardom (Google News). Associated Press.