New College at Hackney

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The New College at Hackney (more ambiguously known as Hackney College) was a dissenting academy set up in Hackney, at that time a village on the outskirts of London, by Unitarians. It was in existence from 1786 to 1796. The writer William Hazlitt was among its pupils, sent aged 15 to prepare for the Unitarian ministry,[1] and some of the best-known Dissenting intellectuals spent time on its staff.[2]

History[edit]

The year 1786 marked the dissolution of Warrington Academy, which had been inactive since 1756 as a teaching institution. Almost simultaneously the Hoxton Academy of the Coward Trust, under Samuel Morton Savage, closed its doors in the summer of 1785.[3] Some of the funding that had backed Warrington was available for a new dissenting academy for the London area, as well as for a northern successor in Manchester. The London building plans were ambitious, but proved the undoing of the New College, which was soon strained financially.[4]

The successors in the movement as a whole were Manchester New College, and a new Exeter College under Joseph Bretland, which existed from 1799 to 1805.[5]

Staff[edit]

Its staff included:

Students[edit]

Among the students were:

Institutions with related names[edit]

Another Hackney College, properly Hackney Itineracy, was that set up in 1802 by George Collison, and it is this one that became part of New College London, and in the end part of the University of London. Homerton College was at this time in the parish of Hackney, and had been in some form from 1730, as a less ambitious academy; when the New College folded, its future became part of Homerton College's.[24] Robert Aspland set up a successor Unitarian college at Hackney, in 1813.[25]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^  "Hazlitt, William". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  2. ^ Herbert J McLachlan, The Old Hackney College 1786-1796; Trans. Unitarian Historical Soc.; 3(1923-26) 185-205.
  3. ^  "Savage, Samuel Morton". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  4. ^ David L. Wykes, The Dissenting Academy and Rational Dissent, pp. 131-2 in Knud Haakonssen (editor), Enlightenment and Religion: Rational dissent in eighteenth-century Britain (1996).
  5. ^  "Bretland, Joseph". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  6. ^ a b  "Belsham, Thomas". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  7. ^ a b c d  "Wellbeloved, Charles". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  8. ^ William P. Griffith, Priestley in London, Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, Vol. 38, No. 1 (Aug., 1983), pp. 1-16.
  9. ^ Joseph Priestley. Heads of Lectures on ... Chemistry, delivered at the New College in Hackney; J Johnson, London, 1794.
  10. ^  "Rees, Abraham". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  11. ^  "Aikin, Arthur". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  12. ^ ODNB article on Bostock.
  13. ^ H W Stephenson; Hackney College and William Hazlitt; Trans. Unitarian Historical Soc.; 4 (1927-30), 219-47, 376-411.
  14. ^  "Hincks, Thomas Dix". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  15. ^  "Jones, David (1795-1816)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  16. ^ http://www.1john57.com/bdbackground.htm
  17. ^  "Jones, John (1766?-1827)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  18. ^ ODNB
  19. ^  "Kentish, John". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  20. ^  "Norgate, Thomas Starling". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  21. ^  "Shepherd, William". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  22. ^  "Smith, James (1775-1839)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  23. ^ ODNB, for father Joseph Towers.
  24. ^ http://www.homertonconference.com/Homerton-College-Cambridge.html
  25. ^  "Aspland, Robert (1782-1845)". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.