New England Interstate Route 9

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New England Route 9 marker

New England Route 9
Route information
Length: 447.58 mi (720.31 km)
Vermont: 47.15 mi (75.88 km)
New Hampshire: 110.00 mi (177.03 km)
Maine: 290.43 mi (467.40 km)
Existed: 1922 – present
Major junctions
West end: NY-7.svg NY Route 7 in Hoosick, NY
  I-91.svg I-91 in Brattleboro, VT
I-89.svg I-89 in Hopkinton, NH
I-93.svg I-93 in Concord, NH
I-393.svgUS 4.svgUS 202 square.svg Interstate 393 in Concord, NH
Spaulding Turnpike.svgNH Route 16.svg Spaulding Turnpike in Dover, NH
I-95 (ME).svg I-95 in Wells, ME
I-395 (ME).svg I-395 in Bangor, ME
East end: Ferry Point International Bridge to Route 170 in St. Stephen, NB, Canada
Highway system
New England road marking system

Route 9 is a multi-state state highway in the New England region of the United States, running across the southern parts of New Hampshire, Vermont and Maine, and numbered, owned, and maintained by each of those states. Its number was assigned in 1922, when it was designated one of the New England Interstate Routes, also known as the Bennington-Wells Route. Much of the route remains intact in Vermont and New Hampshire. In Maine, however, Route 9 has since been extended eastward by about 270 miles (435 km) from its original terminus in Wells, through Biddeford, Portland, and Bangor, to the Canadian border in Calais.

History[edit]

Route 9 originally extended 167 miles (269 km) across the southern part of Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine, from the New York-Vermont border in Bennington, via Brattleboro and Keene, to Wells. When New York first signed its state highways in 1924, the westward continuation of the route towards Troy was also designated as New York State Route 9. In 1927, however, because of the designation of U.S. Route 9, New York renumbered its former Route 9 as Route 7. By the beginning of 1934, Maine extended its portion of Route 9 by about 270 miles (430 km) to the Canadian border in Calais, creating an alternate route to U.S. Route 1.[1]

Route description[edit]

Vermont[edit]

Main article: Vermont Route 9

Vermont Route 9 begins at the New York state line in Bennington, Vermont, where it continues west as Route 7. It crosses the Green Mountains to Brattleboro, Vermont, where it crosses the Connecticut River into Chesterfield, New Hampshire. Route 9 in Vermont is also known as the Molly Stark Byway.[2] The VT Route 9 section between Bennington and Searsburg across Woodford Mountain is notorious for its steep and winding bends, which over the years have contributed to a number of tractor-trailer incidents on this stretch of the road.[citation needed]

New Hampshire[edit]

Main article: New Hampshire Route 9

New Hampshire Route 9 runs through Keene, Concord and Dover. It runs concurrent with U.S. Route 202 for much of its path across the Granite State. The concurrent section of Route 202/9 between Hillsborough and Hopkinton, which passes through Henniker, is considered one of the most deadly sections of road in the state.[3] Route 9 crosses the Salmon Falls River from Somersworth, New Hampshire, into Berwick, Maine.

Route 9A is an alternate route in Chesterfield.

Maine[edit]

Main article: Maine State Route 9

Maine Route 9 runs in a rather circuitous route from Berwick to Calais, where it ends at the Canadian border - the St. Croix River - and becomes Route 1 in the province of New Brunswick.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Browse numbered routes
VT 8A VT VT 10
US 5 list NH 10
SR 8 ME SR 10
Route 8 N.E. Route 10