New Fist of Fury

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New Fist Of Fury
NewFistOfFury poster.jpg
1976 film poster
Traditional 新精武門
Simplified 新精武门
Mandarin Xīn Jīng Wǔ Mén
Directed by Lo Wei
Produced by Lo Wei
Written by Lo Wei
Pan Lei
Starring Jackie Chan
Han Ying-chieh
Nora Miao
Tong Yim-chan
Cinematography Chan Chiu-yung
Chan Wing-shu
Chan Chung-yuen
Edited by Lee Yim-hoi
Distributed by Lo Wei Motion Film Productions
Release dates
  • 8 July 1976 (1976-07-08)
Running time 114 minutes
Country Hong Kong
Language Mandarin
Box office HKD $456,787.20

New Fist of Fury is a 1976 Hong Kong martial arts film directed by Lo Wei and starring Jackie Chan. It is the first of several films that Lo directed Chan in, and the first using Chan's stage name Sing Lung (literally meaning "becoming a dragon", by which Chan is still known today in Asia). The film gave Chan his first starring role in a widely released film (his first starring role was in the Little Tiger of Canton which only had a limited release in 1973). The film was a sequel to Bruce Lee's Fist of Fury, one of Lo Wei's biggest successes. New Fist of Fury was part of Lo's attempt to market Jackie Chan as the new Bruce Lee and did not contain any of the comedy elements that were to be Chan's career trademark later on.

Cast[edit]

  • Jackie Chan as Cheng Long / Sing Lung / Ah Lung / Dragon
  • Nora Miao as Mao Li Er / Miss Lee
  • Chan Sing as Okimura
  • Luk Yat-lung as Lon Si Chun
  • Yim Chung as Master Su, Mao's grandfather
  • Suen Lam as Taiwan police captain Lin
  • Cheng Siu-siu as Okimura's daughter
  • Lau Ming as Ah Lung's mother
  • Hon Siu as Ho Chin
  • Han Ying-chieh as Hung
  • Lo Wei as Inspector
  • Chiang Kam as Sampo
  • Liu Ping as Lin Chin Kui
  • Yip Hoi-ching as Okimura's student
  • Weng Hsiao-hu as Okimura's student
  • Suen San-cheung as Japanese
  • Hau Pak-wai as assassin
  • Wang Chiang-liang as assassin
  • Ho Wai-hung as assassin
  • Tsang Ming-cheong as Kui's thug
  • Chan Sam-lam as Kui's thug
  • Shih Ting-ken as Kui's thug
  • Lam Chung as Kui's thug
  • Tai Chi-hsien as Kui's thug
  • So Kwok-leung as Kui's thug
  • Ho Ming-hiu as Kui's thug
  • Wong Wing-sang as student
  • Lee Lung-yam as student
  • Yip Fei-yang as Jingwu student
  • Ching Kuo-chung as Chun's student
  • Ngai Loi as Japanese officer
  • Chan Jan as Okimura's bodyguard
  • Lee Siu-Ming as Okimura's bodyguard
  • Cheung Chung-kwai
  • Ko Chang-sheng
  • Wong Chi-sang
  • Wong Kwok-fai
  • Lui Wan-biu

Plot (1976 version)[edit]

A brother and sister escape from Japanese-occupied Shanghai to Japanese-occupied Taiwan, to stay with their grandfather who runs a Kung-Fu school there. However, the master of a Japanese Karate school in Taiwan has designs on bringing all other schools on the island under his domination, and part of his plan involves the murder of the siblings' grandfather. Undaunted, the brother and sister reestablish their grandfather's school, leading to a final confrontation with the Japanese Karate master. Jackie Chan plays a young thief who at first does not want to learn Kung-fu, but finally realizes that he can no longer stand by and let the Japanese trample the rights of the Chinese people. He proves extremely adept at the martial arts, and carries the fight to its final conclusion.

Plot (1980 version)[edit]

Jackie Chan plays a young Taiwanese thief who steals a nunchaku after fighting with a pair of Japanese men, he assumes they belong to the local Japanese kung fu school (Da Yang Gate). The school offers him a job in a casino but refuses, and is beaten up as a result. He is rescued by the surviving members of the Jingwu school and is invited to Mao Li Uhr's grandfather's 80th birthday celebration where a group of Japanese decide to gatecrash. This causes Mao Li Uhr's grandfather to die of a heart attack. The remaining Jingwu student's acquire his home and convert it into a new Jingwu school. The Japanese council closes down the school and Jackie Chan finally realizes that he can no longer stand by and let the Japanese trample the rights of the Chinese people. He proves extremely adept at the martial arts, and carries the fight to its final conclusion.

1976/1980 versions[edit]

  • In 1976, the film was released in Mandarin with a counterpart English version for export.
  • To capitalise on Jackie Chan's success with The Young Master, the film was re-edited (removing 40 minutes of footage), given a Cantonese soundtrack and re-released in 1980.

DVDs[edit]

  • On 18 June 2001, Seven 7 released the French theatrical version in 2.35:1 entitled La Nouvelle Fureur De Vaincre. The DVD featured no other language options.
  • On 12 March 2002, Columbia Tristar Home Entertainment released the 1976 version in 2.35:1 with Mandarin and English soundtracks. However, it featured dubtitles and is very slightly cut.
  • On 25 March 2002, Eastern Heroes released an uncut version. However, this was cropped from 2.35:1 to 1.78:1 and only included an English dub. An extras was the export English trailer.
  • On 25 October 2005, Universal Japan released the 1980 Cantonese version in 2.35:1, using newly restored materials from Fortune Star. However, it features no English subtitles.
  • On 21 May 2007, Hong Kong Legends also released the 1980 version, but instead contained the first soundtrack of Mandarin (in abridged form) with newly translated English subtitles and an English dub. An extra is the first ten minutes of the export English version.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]