New Jersey Department of the Treasury

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State of New Jersey Department of the Treasury
Seal of New Jersey.svg
Agency overview
Jurisdiction New Jersey
Headquarters State House, 125 West State Street, Trenton, New Jersey
Agency executive Andrew P. Sidamon-Eristoff, State Treasurer
Parent agency State of New Jersey
Website http://www.state.nj.us/treasury/

The mission of the New Jersey Department of the Treasury is to formulate and manage the state's budget, generate and collect revenues, disburse the appropriations used to operate New Jersey state government, manage the state's physical and financial assets, and provide statewide support services to state and local government agencies as well as the citizens of New Jersey. The department’s overriding goal is to ensure the most beneficial use of fiscal resources and revenues to meet critical needs, all within a policy framework set by the governor.

Andrew P. Sidamon-Eristoff was nominated by New Jersey Governor Chris Christie as State Treasurer and assumed the duties of Acting State Treasurer on January 19, 2010. He was sworn in on March 2, 2010, after having been confirmed by the New Jersey Senate.[1]

The Office of the State Treasurer is one of the oldest units of New Jersey state government, the first treasurer named in 1776, following adoption of the first New Jersey State Constitution.

State Treasurer of New Jersey[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Office of the State Treasurer". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-04-04. 
  2. ^ "Financier Is to Be Named New Jersey's Treasurer". New York Times. January 13, 2006. Retrieved 2014-08-23. 
  3. ^ David M. Halbfinger (March 29, 2001). "Nominee Quits Treasurer Post In New Jersey". New York Times. Retrieved 2014-08-23. Five days after taking office as New Jersey's acting state treasurer, Isabel Miranda abruptly resigned ... 
  4. ^ "New Jersey Treasurer Nominee Was Fired by Bank, Workers Say". New York Times. March 26, 2001. Retrieved 2014-08-23. 
  5. ^ "New Jersey Treasurer Plans To Sell State Disability Fund". New York Times. January 25, 1997. Retrieved 2014-08-23. The State Treasurer, Brian W. Clymer 
  6. ^ "New Jersey's New Treasurer Defends Budget to Assembly". New York Times. March 20, 1992. Retrieved 2014-08-23. 
  7. ^ "The 2d Man at the Helm of New Jersey's Taut Ship of State". New York Times. June 18, 1990. Retrieved 2014-08-23. 
  8. ^ "Walter T. Margetts, 78, Dies. Ex-State Treasurer Of Jersey". New York Times. March 27, 1983. Retrieved 2014-08-23. Mr. Margetts served as Treasurer from 1949 to 1954, in the administration of Gov. Alfred E. Driscoll. ... 
  9. ^ "Middleton Made Jersey Traeasurer". New York Sun. January 31, 1928. Retrieved 2014-08-23. 
  10. ^ "To Be Jersey's Treasurer. Republican Caucus Names Read of Camden for Grosscup's Place". New York Times. February 1, 1916. Retrieved 2014-08-23. 
  11. ^ a b "Grosscup State Treasurer and Hughes Senator". New York Times. January 29, 1913. Retrieved 2013-11-16. At a joint session of both houses at noon, Edward E. Grosscup of Gloucester County, Chairman of the Democratic State Committee, was elected State Treasurer to succeed Daniel S. Voorhees, Republican. The latter was his party's choice for re-election, but the Democrats, with a majority vote of 46, had things their own way and wrested the office from the opposition after it had been in Republican hands for nineteen years. 
  12. ^ a b Henry Cooper Pitney (1914). "Daniel Spader Voorhees". A History of Morris County, New Jersey: Embracing Upwards of Two Centuries, 1710-1913. p. 418. At a joint meeting of the legislature, February 14, 1907, Mr. Voorhees was appointed to the office of State Treasurer, for a full term of three years, to succeed Frank O. Briggs. He entered upon his duties, March 1, 1907, and at the expiration of his term was re-elected. serving at the present time (1913) ... 
  13. ^ "New Jersey State Comptroller Tenders His Resignation". Philadelphia Record. February 11, 1902. Retrieved 2011-10-06. 
  14. ^ "Ex-Senator Briggs Dead in Trenton". New York Times. May 19, 1913. Retrieved 2011-10-27. was Chairman of the Republican State Committee until his death. 

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