New Malden railway station

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New Malden National Rail
New Malden stn northbound look south to junction.JPG
New Malden is located in Greater London
New Malden
New Malden
Location of New Malden in Greater London
Location New Malden
Local authority Kingston upon Thames
Managed by South West Trains
Station code NEM
Number of platforms 4 (2 in use) (facing 4 tracks)
Fare zone 4
National Rail annual entry and exit
2004–05  1.892 million[1]
2005–06 Decrease 1.841 million[1]
2006–07 Increase 3.263 million[1]
2007–08 Increase 3.347 million[1]
2008–09 Decrease 3.113 million[1]
2009–10 Decrease 3.044 million[1]
2010–11 Increase 3.234 million[1]
2011–12 Increase 3.325 million[1]
2012–13 Increase 3.404 million[1]
Key dates
December 1846 Opened as Malden
May 1859 Renamed New Malden and Coombe
1 March 1862 Renamed Coombe and Malden
November 1912 Renamed Malden for Coombe
1955 Renamed Malden
16 September 1957 Renamed New Malden
Other information
Lists of stations
External links
Portal icon London Transport portal
Portal icon UK Railways portalCoordinates: 51°24′14″N 0°15′22″W / 51.4039°N 0.256°W / 51.4039; -0.256

New Malden railway station is in the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames in South London. The station is served by South West Trains, and is in Travelcard Zone 4.

History[edit]

A 1912 Railway Clearing House map showing (right) lines around New Malden railway station (shown here as COMBE & MALDEN)

The station was opened by the London and South Western Railway in December 1846, originally being named Malden. It has been renamed several times: in May 1859 it became New Malden and Coombe; on 1 March 1862 Coombe and Malden; in November 1912 Malden for Coombe; in 1955 Malden; and finally, on 16 September 1957, it took the present name of New Malden.[2]

When Queen Victoria visited distinguished residents in the Coombe Hill area, the royal train stopped at Norbiton, the only station in the area where the platform is at ground level.[citation needed] New Malden has many steps.

The deaths of members of station staff in an air raid during WWII is commemorated on a plaque on a wall in the ticket office and another is allocated on the high street opposite waitrose.

Platforms 2 and 3 on the "fast" lines are no longer used, and their gravelly surface together with protruding cable ducting poses a trip hazard and renders them unlikely to be used by passengers even should a disruption prevent use of the "slow" lines at platforms 1 and 4.

New platform signage was installed in 2009, adhering to the new national standard using the 'Brunel' typeface in white on a navy background.[3]

New Malden was one of the stations selected by South West Trains to have automatic ticket gates which were installed in the main ticket hall in September 2009. The gates with Oyster Card readers allow use of the Oyster "Pay as you go" system.[4]

A proposed permanent closure of the secondary entrance to Dukes Avenue and Station Avenue, leaving only the entrance to Coombe Road was amended, after local opposition, to officially opening the Dukes Avenue and Station Avenue entrance for morning and evening peak hours with ticket inspectors, but to be closed at all other times including weekends.[5] In practice the ticket barriers are very often left open and unstaffed and as such the southern entrance is more than often open, outside of the 'closed' times.[citation needed]

Services[edit]

The typical off-peak hour service from the station is:

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Raynes Park   South West Trains
South Western Main Line
  Berrylands or Surbiton
South West Trains
Kingston Loop Line
Norbiton
  Future Development  
Preceding station   Crossrail roundel.svg National Rail logo.svg Crossrail   Following station
Crossrail
Line 2
towards Hampton Court

Connections[edit]

London Buses routes 213; K1 serve the station.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Station usage estimates". Rail statistics. Office of Rail Regulation.  Please note: Some methodology may vary year on year.
  2. ^ Butt, R.V.J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations. Yeovil: Patrick Stephens Ltd. pp. 68,153,170. ISBN 1-85260-508-1. R508. 
  3. ^ Better Rail Stations—And Independent Review Presented to Lord Adonis, Secretary of State for Transport
  4. ^ "New ticket gates across the network". South West Trains. Retrieved 2008-11-19. 
  5. ^ "More furore over New Malden station exit closure". Retrieved 3 May 2014. 

External links[edit]