The New Orleans Bee

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The New Orleans Bee
L’Abeille de la Nouvelle-Orléans
New Orleans Bee 1917 04 07 frontpage.png
The April 7th 1917 front page reporting the U.S. entry into World War I
Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet
Founded September 1, 1827 (1827-09-01)
Language French, English;
also Spanish (1829-30)
Ceased publication 1925 (1925)
Headquarters New Orleans, Louisiana, United States

The New Orleans Bee[1] (French: L’Abeille de la Nouvelle-Orléans, Spanish: La Abeja de Nueva Orleans[2]) was an American broadsheet newspaper in New Orleans, Louisiana, founded on September 1, 1827, by François Delaup and originally located at 94 St. Peter, between Royal and Bourbon.[3]

Publication[edit]

Initially published three times a week in French Language, an English Language section was added on November 24, 1827,[4] and in this form it was the most successful of New Orleans daily newspapers in the middle of the nineteenth century.[5] The English section was abandoned in 1872 because of increased competition from English-language newspapers,[6] but later restored. A Spanish Language section (Abeja) was published in 1829-1830.[4][7]

Until at least 1897 L'Abeille remained "almost certainly the daily newspaper of choice" for French officials in New Orleans.[8] The title was purchased in 1921 by The Times-Picayune and was published weekly until it closed in 1923.[5] It was by some accounts the last French-language newspaper in New Orleans, ceasing publication on December 27, 1923, after ninety-six years;[9] others assert that it was outlasted by Le Courrier de la Nouvelle Orleans,[10] which continued until 1955.[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The New Orleans Bee. Wednesday January 16, 1861. Volume XVII, Whole No. 11,882. 1. Retrieved on September 19, 2010.
  2. ^ The New Orleans Bee. May 1, 1830. Spanish page 1. Retrieved on September 19, 2010.
  3. ^ Richard Campanella (2002). Time and place in New Orleans: past geographies in the present day. Pelican Publishing Company. p. 148. ISBN 978-1-56554-991-3. 
  4. ^ a b "About this Newspaper: L'Abeille.". Library of Congress. Retrieved 2009-10-10. 
  5. ^ a b Works Progress Administration (2009). New Orleans City Guide. Garrett County Press. pp. 89–90. ISBN 978-1-891053-08-5. 
  6. ^ "Creole Echoes - The Institutions". Louisiana State University. Retrieved 2009-10-09. [dead link]
  7. ^ "New Orleans Bee Home". Jefferson Parish Library. Retrieved 2009-10-11. 
  8. ^ William Arceneaux (2004). No Spark of Malice: The Murder of Martin Begnaud. LSU Press. p. 221. ISBN 978-0-8071-3025-4. 
  9. ^ French, Cajun, Creole, Houma: A Primer on Francophone Louisiana by Carl A. Brasseaux Louisiana State University Press, 2005. ISBN 0-8071-3036-2 pg 32
  10. ^ New Orleans City Guide. The Federal Writers' Project of the Works Progress Administration: 1938 pg 90
  11. ^ Language Shift in the Coastal Marshes of Louisiana by Kevin James Rottet. Peter Lang Publishing: 2001. ISBN 0820449806 pg 60[1]

External links[edit]