New South Wales X200 class locomotive

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New South Wales X200 class
(Mark 1: X201–X206)
250px
X203 at Wagga Wagga while a steam hauled enthusiast special stand at the platform on 19 September 1965
Type and origin
Power type Diesel-mechanical
Builder Chullora Railway Workshops
Total produced 6
Specifications
UIC classification B
Gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in)
Wheel diameter 36 in (914 mm)
Wheelbase 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)
Length Over headstocks:
20 ft 7 12 in (6.29 m),
Over coupler pulling faces:
24 ft 0 in (7.32 m)
Width 9 ft 0 14 in (3 m)
Height 11 ft 3 in (3.43 m)
Axle load 15 long tons 0 cwt (33,600 lb or 15.2 t)
Locomotive weight 30 long tons 0 cwt (67,200 lb or 30.5 t)
Fuel type Diesel
Fuel capacity 156 imp gal (709 l; 187 US gal)
Lubricant capacity Engine:
8 imp gal (36.4 l; 9.6 US gal),
Transmission:
13.75 imp gal (62.5 l; 16.5 US gal),
Final drive:
6 imp gal (27.3 l; 7.2 US gal)
Coolant capacity 15 imp gal (68 l; 18 US gal)
Sandbox capacity 4.5 cu ft (0.13 m3)
Prime mover Hercules DFXH-F
Engine RPM range 650–1850
Engine type Four-stroke diesel
Aspiration Naturally aspirated
Cylinders 6
Cylinder size 5.75 in × 6 in (146 mm × 152 mm)
Transmission Allison CRT5631-8, with NSWGR design final drive
Performance figures
Maximum speed 24 mph (39 km/h)
Power output Gross:
260 hp (194 kW)
at 2100 rpm,
For traction:
200 hp (149 kW)
Tractive effort Continuous:
17,750 lbf (78.96 kN)
at 2.5 mph (4.0 km/h)
Career
Operator(s) New South Wales Government Railways
Number(s) X201–X206
First run 2 December 1963
Preserved X203, X204
Current owner UGL Rail
Disposition 1 in service, 2 preserved
New South Wales X200 class
(Mark 2: X207–X218)
Arhs x217 murwillumbah.jpg
Type and origin
Power type Diesel-mechanical
Builder Chullora Railway Workshops
Total produced 12
Specifications
UIC classification B
Gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in)
Wheel diameter 36 in (914 mm)
Wheelbase 7 ft 0 in (2.13 m)
Length Over headstocks:
20 ft 9 in (6.32 m),
Over coupler pulling faces:
24 ft 1 12 in (7.35 m)
Width 9 ft 0 38 in (3 m)
Height 12 ft 7 18 in (3.84 m)
Axle load 15 long tons 0 cwt (33,600 lb or 15.2 t)
Locomotive weight 30 long tons 0 cwt (67,200 lb or 30.5 t)
Fuel type Diesel
Fuel capacity 156 imp gal (709 l; 187 US gal)
Lubricant capacity Engine:
5.875 imp gal (26.7 l; 7.1 US gal),
Transmission:
13.75 imp gal (62.5 l; 16.5 US gal),
Final drive:
6 imp gal (27.3 l; 7.2 US gal)
Coolant capacity 17.5 imp gal (80 l; 21 US gal)
Sandbox capacity 4.5 cu ft (0.13 m3)
Prime mover Cummins NHRS-6-BI
Engine RPM range 625–1900
Engine type Four-stroke diesel
Aspiration Scavenge-blown
Cylinders 6
Cylinder size 5.125 in × 6 in (130.2 mm × 152.4 mm)
Transmission Allison CRT5631-6, with NSWGR design final drive
Performance figures
Maximum speed 32 mph (51 km/h)
Power output Gross:
290 hp (216 kW)
at 2100 rpm,
For traction: 260 hp (194 kW)
Tractive effort Continuous:
17,750 lbf (78.96 kN)
at 3.6 mph (5.8 km/h)
Career
Operator(s) New South Wales Government Railways
Number(s) X207–X218
First run 1967
Preserved X214, X215, X217
Current owner SCT Logistics
Disposition 2 in service, 3 preserved

The X200 class were a class of rail tractors introduced in 1963 and operated by the New South Wales Government Railways of Australia. They were a development of the smaller and less numerous X100 class. The X200 class remained in service until 1990 when they were either withdrawn or sold off to private companies, and some remain operational today.

Mark 1 series[edit]

The Mark 1 series of the X200 class were 3 times more powerful and twice as heavy as the X100 class. Six examples were built and numbered X201-X206.

They were built using a number of steam locomotive spare parts. They were built on the inner bogies of the AD60 Beyer-Garratt class locomotives, and used spare C36 class locomotive windows in their cabs. Their engines were rated at 260 hp (190 kW) at 2,100 rpm and had a top speed of 24 mph. The rounded shapes of the hoods and cab gave it a baby-brother appearance to the main line 42 and 44 classes. The addition of a train brake allowed them to be run on the main line and also to be used as replacements for various ageing shunting locomotives. X201 was the first of the class entering service in December 1963. The six Mark 1s were initially used in the Sydney metropolitan network, but did later find their ways beyond this region.[1]

Mark 2 series[edit]

The Mark 2 series of the X200 class were different again. Twelve examples were built and numbered X207-X218.

They were built on the outer bogies of the AD60 Beyer-Garratt class locomotives. Their engines were more powerful rated at 290 hp (220 kW) at 2,100 rpm and they had a higher top speed of 32 mph. This made them more practical for light line use. One was even rostered on to the Yass Tramway, previously the domain of the Z13 class tank locomotives. The Z13 class were called back to Yass during winter months to provide heating to the train. The exterior design of the Mark 2 was squarer, giving it the appearance of a baby-brother to the 49 class diesel locomotives.

The first six were built in 1967. The second six being an additional order, were placed into traffic from May 1968, with the final member of the class entering service in December 1968. Despite differences in engine horsepower ratings, both variants were rated as having a tractive effort of 17,750 lbf (79.0 kN). This was more powerful than many of the typical small and workshop steam shunting locomotives of the time.[1]

Summary[edit]

The X200 class must be considered largely successful, as they began to replace the various ageing steam shunting locomotives in various depots of the time. They were cleaner, more efficient to run, requiring less maintenance, and also giving locomotive crews more comfortable working conditions. Another indicator of the class' success is that several examples are still operational even today, at an age of around 45 years! Unfortunately, with the volatile and ever-changing nature of rail transport companies in the modern day, it is hard to keep a 100% accurate listing of their current owners and operational areas.

Some steam shunting locomotives of New South Wales Railways compared to an X200 class
Type Power [2] Wheel Arrangement Total weight
X200 Rail Tractor 17,750 lbf 0-4-0 30T
Z13 (4-4-2T) 13,000 lbf 4-4-2T 54T
Z18 (0-6-0T) 11,550 lbf 0-6-0T 31T
X10 (F351 2-4-0T) 9,090 lbf 2-4-0T 38T
X1044 6,050 lbf
X1046/X1047 12,540 lbf
X10 (7-ton luffing crane) 14,900 lbf 0-4-0T 39T

There is a certain amount of confusion with the numbering in this class. The numbers specified above apply to the class when first issued to traffic. In later years a certain amount of number-swapping was carried out by workshops. The biggest confusion being X101 and X212 swapping numbers, being two completely different types of locomotive! X217 and X218 later became X117 and X118, confusing the matter further. It appears that members of the X200 class were indiscriminately re-numbered into the X100 series. Many other renumberings exist. For the purposes of research it is often easier to refer to individual locomotives by their numbers when first issued to traffic and to note any number changes in brackets as below.

Remaining examples[edit]

Preserved[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Australian Model Railway Magazine, Vol. 12 No. 2, Issue 131, August 1985, SCMRA Publications
  2. ^ Grunbach, Alex (1989). A Compendium of New South Wales Steam Locomotives. Australian Railway Historical Society NSW Division. ISBN 0-909650-27-6. 

Further reading[edit]

  • New South Wales Rail System Locomotives. Sydney: Archives Section, State Rail Authority of New South Wales. 1984. 
X203 at Wagga Wagga in 1970
X202 on the Yass tramway at Yass Junction in December 1970
X217 undergoing restoration at the Richmond Vale Railway Museum
The cab of X217 undergoing restoration at the Richmond Vale Railway Museum