New York City Public Advocate election, 2009

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New York City Public Advocate election, 2009
New York City
2005 ←
November 3, 2009 → 2013

  NLN Bill DeBlasio 01.jpg
Candidate Bill de Blasio Alex T. Zablocki
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 724,629 164,090
Percentage 77.6% 17.6%

Public Advocate before election

Betsy Gotbaum
Democratic

Elected Public Advocate

Bill de Blasio
Democratic

The election of the New York City Public Advocate took place on Tuesday, November 3, 2009, along with elections for the Mayor, the City Comptroller, borough presidents, and members of the New York City Council. The Democratic candidate, Bill de Blasio, won election with 77% of the vote against 18% for the Republican nominee, Alex Zablocki, 3.6% for the Conservative nominee, William Lee, and 1.7% for two others.[1]

The Public Advocate has the formal role of presiding over meetings of the New York City Council (although the Speaker elected by the Council itself now does much of this work), and, until the next election, would serve as acting Mayor whenever the elected Mayor is unable to serve.

This election has drawn significant interest from politicians looking to advance their careers, as the extension of New York City term limits allows more incumbents to seek reelection.[2]

Candidates[edit]

Democratic party[edit]

Despite the extension of term limits in late 2008, the outgoing Public Advocate, Betsy Gotbaum announced that she would not run for reelection.[3]

Candidates included Councilman Eric Gioia of Queens, who has raised $2.5 million for the campaign; Norman Siegel, the civil liberties lawyer who lost in a runoff to Gotbaum in 2001; former public advocate Mark Green, and Councilman Bill de Blasio of Brooklyn.

After acknowledging he was considering the race in December 2008,[4] former Public Advocate Mark J. Green announced on February 10, 2009 that he would again run for the office.[5][6] Green was Gotbaum's predecessor as Public Advocate and the first person to hold this title. His entry changed the landscape of the race, due to his name recognition and ability to raise money.[7]

Councilman John Liu, also from Queens, had been considered a potential candidate for Advocate, but he ran for and won the office of New York City Comptroller— an office uncontested by the current Comptroller, Bill Thompson, who preferred to seek election as Mayor in 2009.[8] Councilwoman Jessica Lappin and Guillermo Linares, a former councilman and current commissioner of the Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs, were also considering a run[2] Assemblyman Adam Clayton Powell IV was also considered a potential candidate.[7] Lappin decided not to run.[9] Imtiaz S. Syed, a lawyer, economist, investigative accountant, banker, administrator and management consultant, also ran.[10]

On September 15, 2009, de Blasio won 32.6% of the Democratic primary vote and Green 31.5%. (Most of the remaining 36% of the primary voters cast their ballots for Gioia or Siegel.) Neither de Blasio nor Green won enough votes (40%) to avoid a run-off primary election between them two weeks later.

On September 29, Bill de Blasio won that Democratic primary run-off by 62.4% to 37.6% for Mark Green. Turnout was very light, about 220,000 or 10% of the eligible voters, according to The Associated Press. (In the same run-off election, John Liu led his fellow City Councilman David Yassky, of Brooklyn, for the Democratic nomination for New York City Comptroller by 56% to 44% of a similar turnout.)[11]

Republican party[edit]

Alex Zablocki, an aide to State Senator Andrew Lanza of Staten Island, has declared his candidacy. At 26 years old, Zablocki is the youngest candidate to run for Public Advocate.[citation needed]

Other parties[edit]

Campaign[edit]

Gotbaum has set up meetings with each of her potential successors in order to help them understand the position.[12] On March 30, 2009, Alex Zablocki, Republican candidate for Public Advocate, met with Gotbaum in her office for about an hour to discuss the importance of the office and afterwards thanked her for her service.[13]

On March 10, Fordham Law School hosted a town hall meeting with Gioia, Siegel, de Blasio and Green.[14] Zablocki was not invited, which he considered an "outrage". The organizer said that he believed students wanted to see the Democratic contenders first, and wished to set up a debate including Zablocki in the future.

Endorsements[edit]

De Blasio was endorsed by the New York Times,[15] the Working Families Party, and over 150 elected officials and organizations.[16][17] Gioia was endorsed by various labor unions, including Local One of the Stagehands, the Sergeants Benevolent Association and the Captains Endowment Association.[18][19] Alex Zablocki was endorsed by all five Republican county organizations in New York City,[20] led by his home borough of Staten Island.[21] Alex Zablocki was also endorsed by the Staten Island Advance on October 30, 2009,[22] as well as The Wave,[23] Rockaway's leading newspaper, on October 23, 2009.

Results[edit]

Democratic Primary[edit]

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

Official results from the New York City Board of Elections as of September 25, 2009:

2009 Democratic initial primary Manhattan The Bronx Brooklyn Queens Richmond [Staten Is.] Total %
Bill de Blasio 35,013 16,662 47,791 17,054 2,947 119,467 32.6%
31.7% 36.7% 41.3% 20.5% 24.6%
Mark Green 34,601 14,426 33,790 28,480 4,211 115,508 31.5%
31.3% 31.8% 29.2% 34.2% 35.1%
Eric N. Gioia 17,309 6,859 15,082 24,838 2,771 66,859 18.2%
15.7% 15.1% 13.0% 29.8% 23.1%
Norman Siegel 20,246 5,745 14,335 10,135 1,759 52,220 14.2%
18.3% 12.7% 12.4% 12.2% 14.7%
Imtiaz S. Syed 3,221 1,679 4,750 2,875 295 12,820 3.5%
2.9% 3.7% 4.1% 3.4% 2.5%
all write-in votes 14 1 18 10 0 43 0.01%
T O T A L 110,404 45,372 115,766 83,392 11,983 366,917

As no candidate reached 40%, a runoff election for de Blasio and Green set for September 29 was required.[24][25]

Democratic Run-off Primary[edit]

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Official returns (as reported on October 20, 2009):

2009 Democratic run-off primary Manhattan The Bronx Brooklyn Queens Richmond [Staten Is.] Total %
Bill de Blasio 46,295 17,074 49,667 28,450 3,927 145,413 62.4%
61.4% 61.7% 67.6% 57.0% 58.0%
Mark Green 29,121 10,589 23,814 21,429 2,840 87,793 37.6%
38.6% 38.3% 32.4% 43.0% 42.0%
T O T A L 75,416 27,663 73,481 49,879 6,767 233,206

Bill de Blasio became the Democratic nominee for Public Advocate.[26]

General Election[edit]

Tuesday, November 3, 2009

2009 general election party Manhattan The Bronx Brooklyn Queens Staten Island Total %
Bill de Blasio Democratic 183,917 92,022 205,155 166,119 32,153 679,366 72.7%
Working Families 12,608 3,434 18,602 8,215 2,404 45,263 4.8%
Total 196,525 95,456 223,757 174,334 34,557 724,629 77.6%
81.5% 84.9% 81.7% 73.2% 50.5%
Alex T. Zablocki Republican 35,515 13,013 37,683 49,988 27,891 164,090 17.6%
14.7% 11.6% 13.8% 21.0% 40.7%
William J. Lee Conservative 4,929 2,902 8,737 10,523 5,185 32,276 3.5%
2.0% 2.6% 3.2% 4.4% 7.6%
Maura de Luca Socialist Workers 2,455 788 2,555 2,029 478 8,305 0.9%
Jim Lesczynski Libertarian 1,812 268 1,223 1,138 367 4,808 0.5%
Total Write-ins 37 17 30 29 10 123 0.01%
Total Votes 241,273 112,444 273,985 238,041 68,488 934,231

Source: Board of Elections in the City of New York http://www.vote.nyc.ny.us/results.html

Bill de Blasio was elected Public Advocate.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Candidate websites

References[edit]

  1. ^ 2009 Election Results, The New York Times, published and retrieved on November 4, 2009
  2. ^ a b Hicks, Jonathan P. (November 28, 2008). "Public Advocate Race Gets More Crowded". The New York Times. Retrieved May 20, 2010. 
  3. ^ Santos, Fernanda (October 28, 2008). "Betsy Gotbaum Says She Will Not Seek Re-election as the City's Public Advocate". The New York Times. Retrieved May 20, 2010. 
  4. ^ Hicks, Jonathan P. (December 8, 2008). "Put Off by Term-Limits Fight, Green Ponders Another Run for Public Advocate". The New York Times. Retrieved May 20, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Mark Green Announces Candidacy For Public Advocate", NY1. Accessed February 10, 2009.
  6. ^ Chan, Sewell (February 11, 2009). "Former New York City Public Advocate Wants the Job Back". The New York Times. Retrieved May 20, 2010. 
  7. ^ a b Hicks, Jonathan P. (December 8, 2008). "Green Shakes Up Race for Public Advocate". The New York Times. Retrieved May 20, 2010. 
  8. ^ "Queens Newspaper New York – Queens NY News Paper- The Queens Courier > Archives > News > Top Stories > John Liu now running for City Comptroller". The Queens Courier. March 11, 2009. Retrieved October 20, 2011. 
  9. ^ [1][dead link]
  10. ^ http://www.vote.nyc.ny.us/pdf/documents/boe/2009PrimaryElection/CandidacyList.pdf
  11. ^ Sewell Chan, Liu and de Blasio Win Primary Runoffs, City Room Blog, The New York Times, Tuesday, September 29, 2009, retrieved on September 30, 2009
  12. ^ Hicks, Jonathan P. (December 11, 2008). "Public Advocate Meets With Potential Successors". The New York Times. Retrieved May 20, 2010. 
  13. ^ Tom Wrobleski. "Zablocki meets with Gotbaum | SILive.com". Blog.silive.com. Retrieved October 20, 2011. 
  14. ^ Santos, Fernanda (March 11, 2009). "Meet the Public Advocate Contenders". The New York Times. Retrieved May 20, 2010. 
  15. ^ "For New York City Public Advocate". The New York Times. August 29, 2009. Retrieved May 20, 2010. 
  16. ^ Paybarah, Azi. "The W.F.P., Bill de Blasio and the Public Advocate’s Race | The New York Observer". Observer.com. Retrieved October 20, 2011. 
  17. ^ "RELEASE: WFP Endorses Bill de Blasio for Public Advocate; Lander for Council | Room Eight". R8ny.com. July 12, 2010. Retrieved October 20, 2011. 
  18. ^ [2][dead link]
  19. ^ [3][dead link]
  20. ^ "Staten Island Advance Print Edition – - Staten Island Advance". SILive.com. Retrieved October 20, 2011. 
  21. ^ Tom Wrobleski. "Zablocki gets Staten Island GOP backing | SILive.com". Blog.silive.com. Retrieved October 20, 2011. 
  22. ^ Staten Island Advance Editorial. "For public advocate: Alex Zablocki". SILive.com. Retrieved October 20, 2011. 
  23. ^ http://www.alex2009.com/news/Wave%20Endorsement.pdf>
  24. ^ Julie Bosman (September 15, 2009). "De Blasio and Green in Runoff for Advocate". New York Times. Retrieved September 16, 2009. 
  25. ^ Board of Elections in the City of New York, "Statement and Return Report for Certification Primary Election 2009 – September 15, 2009 Crossover – Democratic Party Democratic Public Advocate Citywide", published on September 25, 2009, and retrieved on November 4, 2009
  26. ^ Board of Elections in the City of New York,Statement and Return Report for Certification Run-off Primary 2009 – September 29, 2009 Crossover – Democratic Party Democratic Public Advocate Citywide, published on October 20, 2009 and retrieved on November 4, 2009]