New York City mayoral election, 2009

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New York City mayoral election, 2009
New York City
2005 ←
November 3, 2009
→ 2013

  Michael R Bloomberg.jpg Alg thompson recropped 1-Oct-2009.png
Candidate Michael Bloomberg Bill Thompson
Party Independent Democratic
Alliance Republican Working Families
Popular vote 585,466 534,869
Percentage 50.7% 46.3%

NYCmayoralelectionresultsbyborough2009.svg

Results by Borough
  Thompson—60-70%
  Thompson—50-60%
  Bloomberg—50-60%
  Bloomberg—60-70%

Mayor before election

Michael Bloomberg
Republican

Elected Mayor

Michael Bloomberg
Independent

The 2009 election for Mayor of New York City took place on Tuesday, November 3. The incumbent Mayor, Michael Bloomberg, an independent who left the Republican Party in 2008, won reelection on the Republican and Independence Party/Jobs & Education lines with 50.7% of the vote over the retiring City Comptroller, Bill Thompson, a Democrat (also endorsed by the Working Families Party), who won 46.3%.[1] Thompson had won the Democratic primary election on September 15 with 71% of the vote over City Councilman Tony Avella and Roland Rogers.[2] This was the fifth straight mayoral victory by Republican candidates in New York despite the city's strongly Democratic leaning in national and state elections.

Six other parties' candidates also contested the general election in November. Stephen Christopher of the Conservative Party of New York won 1.6% of the votes, more than the combined total of all the other minor candidates.[1] The turnout of voters—fewer than 350,000 in September and fewer than 1.2 million in November—was relatively low for recent mayoral elections, and Bloomberg won with fewer votes than any successful mayoral candidate had received since women joined the city's electorate in 1917.

Prior to the election, the New York City Council had voted to extend the city's term limits, permitting Bloomberg (previously elected in 2001 and 2005) and other second-term officeholders such as Thompson to run for a third term.[3] Attempts to put this decision to a popular referendum,[3] to reverse it in the federal courts[4] or to override it with state legislation were unsuccessful.

Background[edit]

New York City elected its Mayor by popular vote when Greater New York was formed in 1897, then in 1901, 1903, 1905 and every four years thereafter, as well as in the special elections of 1930 and 1950.

Nineteen of the 31 mayoral elections held between 1897 and 2005 were won by the official candidate of the Democratic Party, eight by the Republican Party's nominee, and four by others. (The last official Democratic candidate to win the mayoralty was David Dinkins in the election of 1989; the last candidate to win the mayoralty without winning either the Republican or the Democratic primary was Mayor John V. Lindsay, running for re-election on the Liberal column in 1969.)

Michael Bloomberg, formerly a Democrat, was elected as a Republican in 2001 and 2005, succeeding another Republican mayor, Rudolph Giuliani, elected in 1993 and 1997. Bloomberg left the Republican Party in 2008 and became a political independent.

By a hotly contested vote of 29–22 on October 23, 2008, the New York City Council extended the former two-term limit for Mayor, Council and other elected city offices to three terms, allowing Mayor Bloomberg to pursue his announced intention of seeking a third term in 2009.[3] Legal challenges to the extension failed in Federal court,[4] and a proposed law in the New York State Legislature to override the extension was not passed.

Bloomberg's most prominent opponent was Bill Thompson, who could (similarly) have run for a third term as New York City Comptroller in 2009, but instead sought and won the Democratic nomination for Mayor.

General election candidates[edit]

Democratic Party[edit]

Democratic Nominee Bill Thompson

Working Families Party[edit]

Republican Party[edit]

Republican backed nominee Michael Bloomberg

Although changing his party affiliation from Republican to Independent in 2007, Bloomberg decided to run again as a Republican and was uncontested in the primary.[8]

Independence Party[edit]

Conservative Party[edit]

Green Party[edit]

Libertarian Party[edit]

New Voice Party[edit]

Party for Socialism and Liberation[edit]

Rent Is 2 Damn High[edit]

Socialist Workers Party[edit]

Independents (no affiliation)[edit]

  • Jonny Porkpie, the "Burlesque Mayor of NYC"[21] Announced his candidacy on August 3, 2009,[22] targeting "The Naked Cowboy" as his main opponent.[23]
  • John M. Finan, Chief Executive Officer, New York City Consulting Group LLC, and a candidate for the Libertarian Party's 2008 nomination for U.S. President.[24]

Candidates who were unsuccessful, withdrew or declined to run[edit]

Democratic Party[edit]

Republican Party[edit]

Independence Party[edit]

  • Tyrrell L. Eiland, non-profit executive, green architectural designer, and author[28] Eiland then ran as the candidate of the New Voice Party.[13]

Independents (no affiliation)[edit]

  • Robert Burck, the "Naked Cowboy"[29] Announced his candidacy on July 22, 2009[30] and withdrew in early September, 2009[31]

Primaries[edit]

Uncontested nominations[edit]

Bloomberg was unopposed for the Republican and Independence Party nominations (which he had also won in 2001 and 2005), Thompson was unopposed for the Working Families Party nomination, and Stephen Christopher was unopposed for the Conservative Party nomination.[12][13]

Democratic primary[edit]

Campaign[edit]

City Comptroller Bill Thompson and Councilman Tony Avella held their first televised debate on Wednesday, August 26, at the New York Public Library. They both directed more fire at Mayor Bloomberg than at each other. "After eight years of a Republican mayor who is focused on developers and the wealthy, I think New Yorkers are looking for change," said Thompson, while Avella declared that the "arrogance of billionaire Mike Bloomberg to think he's so important that he can overturn the term limits law, I think, is disgraceful."[32] Another debate was held on September 9.[33]

Primary election results[edit]

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

From the Board of Elections in the City of New York, September 26, 2009[2]

2009 Democratic primary Manhattan The Bronx Brooklyn Queens Staten Island Total %
William C. Thompson, Jr. 70,881 31,950 75,519 49,063 7,484 234,897 71.0%
73.7% 73.5% 73.9% 63.2% 67.0%
Tony Avella 18,213 7,754 17,945 22,903 2,959 69,774 21.1%
18.9% 17.8% 17.6% 29.5% 26.5%
Roland Rogers 6,975 3,751 8,612 5,553 700 25,591 7.7%
7.3% 8.6% 8.4% 7.2% 6.3%
all Write-In votes 127 10 153 81 26 397 0.1%
0.1% 0.02% 0.1% 0.1% 0.2%
T O T A L 96,196 43,465 102,229 77,600 11,169 330,659  

Tony Avella, member of the New York City Council, representing a district in Queens. Out of the nearly 400 write-in votes, almost half or 184 (representing about one Democratic voter in 2,000) were some form or spelling of Mayor Michael Bloomberg.[2]

Endorsements and public reception[edit]

In the final weeks of the campaign, Mayor Bloomberg was endorsed "enthusiastically" by the New York Times, which – while acknowledging Bill Thompson as a "worthy opponent" – praised Bloomberg for handling city matters "astonishingly well".[34] Most other local newspapers had preceded the Times in endorsing the mayor,[35] but many did so tepidly, presaging the misgivings of The New Yorker. In a report filed days before the election, the magazine likened Bloomberg to Marcus Licinius Crassus:[36]

"The Mayor has ruled us well, but he has infantilized us. We are a little too much like Romans of Crassus' day, when the institutions of the old republic were giving way to a despotic (and competent) imperium.... If Bloomberg had been satisfied with two terms, he would be leaving office a beloved legend, a municipal god. He'll get his third, but we'll give it to him sullenly... The Pax Bloombergiana will endure a while longer. But then what? Will we have forgotten how to govern ourselves?"

Hendrik Hertzberg, The New Yorker

Polling[edit]

Post-primary match-up[edit]

Source Date Bloomberg
(ind.-R-Indep'ce)
Thompson (D-Working Families) Christopher
(Conservative)
Nov. 3 results[1] November 24, 2009 50.7% 46.3% 1.6%
SurveyUSA October 30, 2009 53% 42%  
Marist October 30, 2009 53% 38%  
Quinnipiac October 26, 2009 53% 35% 3%
SurveyUSA October 19, 2009 53% 41%  
SurveyUSA October 12, 2009 55% 38%  
Daily News October 6, 2009 51% 43%
Quinnipiac September 24, 2009 52% 36% 2%
Marist September 17, 2009 52% 43%  

Pre-primary match-ups[edit]

Bloomberg vs. Thompson[edit]

Source Date Bloomberg (ind) Thompson (D)
Quinnipiac August 26, 2009 50% 35%
Quinnipiac July 21, 2009 47% 37%
Marist June 29, 2009 48% 35%
Quinnipiac June 9, 2009 54% 32%
NY1 May 12, 2009 47% 31%
Marist May 5, 2009 51% 33%
Quinnipiac March 17, 2009 49% 35%
Quinnipiac February 17, 2009 50% 33%
Quinnipiac January 20, 2009 50% 34%
NY1 January 20, 2009 45% 32%

Bloomberg vs. Avella[edit]

Source Date Bloomberg (ind) Avella (D)
Quinnipiac July 21, 2009 51% 28%
Marist June 29, 2009 53% 29%
Quinnipiac June 9, 2009 57% 27%
Marist May 5, 2009 52% 27%

Bloomberg approval ratings[edit]

The first table shows Bloomberg's approval ratings since June 2009. The other table shows whether or not people want a new mayor.

Source Date Approval Rating Disapproval Rating
Quinnipiac July 21, 2009 63% 29%
Quinnipiac July 9, 2009 66% 27%
Marist June 29, 2009 58% 40%
Source Date Bloomberg Deserves Reelection Time for a New Mayor
Marist Poll July 8, 2009 44% 51%

General election results[edit]

Tuesday, November 3, 2009

2009 General election party Manhattan The Bronx Brooklyn Queens Staten Island Total %
Bloomberg's margin over Mark Green (2001) – 22,777 – 21,683 – 28,182 + 46,904 + 61,227 + 35,489 + 2.4%
change in Bloomberg's margin of victory, 2001–2005 + 98,973 – 19,634 + 97,622 + 48,125 – 10,705 + 214,381 + 17.0%
Bloomberg's margin over Fernando Ferrer (2005) + 76,196 – 41,317 + 69,440 + 95,029 + 50,522 + 249,870 + 19.4%
change in Bloomberg's margin of victory, 2005–2009 – 35,010 + 6,268 – 91,392 – 59,742 – 19,397 – 199,273 – 15.0%
Bloomberg's margin over Bill Thompson (2009) + 41,186 – 35,049 – 21,952 + 35,287 + 31,125 + 50,597 + 4.4%
net change in Bloomberg's margin, 2001–2009 + 63,963 – 13,366 + 6,230 – 11,617 – 30,102 + 15,108 + 2.0%
Michael R. Bloomberg Republican 102,903 42,066 117,706 126,569 46,149 435,393 37.7%
35.9% 29.0% 34.6% 42.3% 55.4%
Independence/Jobs & Education 56,934 11,730 36,033 36,364 9,012 150,073 13.0%
19.9% 8.1% 10.6% 12.2% 10.8%
Total 159,837 53,796 153,739 162,933 55,161 585,466 50.7%
55.8% 37.0% 45.1% 54.5% 66.2%
William C. Thompson, Jr. Democratic 110,975 86,899 163,230 122,935 22,956 506,995 43.9%
38.7% 59.8% 47.9% 41.1% 27.5%
Working Families Party 7,676 1,946 12,461 4,711 1,080 27,874 2.4%
2.7% 1.3% 3.7% 1.6% 1.3%
Total 118,651 88,845 175,691 127,646 24,036 534,869 46.3%
41.4% 61.2% 51.6% 42.7% 28.8%
Stephen Christopher Conservative 2,217 1,480 5,690 5,267 3,359 18,013 1.6%
0.8% 1.0% 1.7% 1.8% 4.0%
Billy Talen Green 3,083 434 3,338 1,680 367 8,902 0.8%
1.1% 0.3% 1.0% 0.6% 0.4%
Jimmy McMillan Rent Is Too High 823 217 764 404 124 2,332 0.2%
Francisca Villar Socialism & Liberation 674 253 577 420 72 1,996 0.2%
Joseph Dobrian Libertarian 556 104 413 388 155 1,616 0.1%
Dan Fein Socialist Workers 493 120 376 263 59 1,311 0.1%
Write-ins † 100 30 77 60 30 297 .03%
Total recorded votes 286,434 145,279 340,665 299,061 83,363 1,154,802 100.00%
unrecorded ballots 5,172 3,659 6,645 6,254 1,525 23,255  
Total ballots cast 291,606 148,938 347,310 305,315 84,888 1,178,057
The three candidates who received more than 7 write-in votes each were C. Montgomery Burns (Homer Simpson's fictional boss), 27;
City Councilman Tony Avella (who lost the Democratic mayoral primary), 13; and former Mayor Rudolph Giuliani (Republican), 11.
Source: Board of Elections in the City of New York, November 24, 2009[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Board of Elections in the City of New York, Statement and Return Report for Certification General Election 2009 – 11/03/2009 Crossover – All Parties and Independent Bodies Mayor Citywide (PDF), November 24, 2009, retrieved on November 27, 2009
  2. ^ a b c d Board of Elections in the City of New York, Statement and Return Report for Certification Primary Election 2009 – 09/15/2009 Crossover – Democratic Party Democratic Mayor Citywide (PDF), September 25–26, 2009, retrieved on October 21, 2009
  3. ^ a b c Sewell Chan and Jonathan P. Hicks, Council Votes, 29 to 22, to Extend Term Limits, The New York Times, published on-line and retrieved on October 23, 2008
  4. ^ New Yorkers for Bill Thompson
  5. ^ a b c d e Elections Board in the City of New York: The Contest List, Primary Election 2009, as published and retrieved on July 28, 2009
  6. ^ http://www.workingfamiliesparty.org
  7. ^ http://www.nydailynews.com/news/mayor-michael-bloomberg-run-republican-bid-term-article-1.360446
  8. ^ New York Times, April 6, 2009, retrieved April 2009
  9. ^ http://www.workingfamiliesparty.com
  10. ^ "Mike Working Key Labor Party", New York Daily News, April 13, 2009, retrieved April 2009
  11. ^ a b The New York Post, New York – Summary Vote Results Mayor-NYC – Citywide – Dem Primary, published and retrieved on September 16, 2009
  12. ^ a b c d Emily S. Rebb, "Seven Others Striving to Win the Mayor's Job", The New York Times, published on line October 13, 2009, retrieved October 14, 2009
  13. ^ Reverend Billy Announces NYC Green Party Mayoral Bid – Hosannah! Say 'Church of Life After Shopping' Supporters
  14. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=513924
  15. ^ Frances Villar campaign web site
  16. ^ [1]
  17. ^ a b c Board of Elections in the City of New York 2005 General Election official results
  18. ^ http://www.ourcampaigns.com/CandidateDetail.html?CandidateID=63040
  19. ^ http://www.themilitant.com/2009/7309/730954.html
  20. ^ Jonny Porkpie Lives in Mary Carey's Shadow. New York Press (August 6, 2009).
  21. ^ JonnyPorkpie.com
  22. ^ Jonnie Porkpie, New York's "Mayor of Burlesque," Wants To Be New York's "Mayor of New York". The L Magazine (August 6, 2009)
  23. ^ http://www.JohnMFinan.com
  24. ^ Tony Avella for Mayor
  25. ^ http://www.mayorblakeman2009.com/
  26. ^ Stop Parsing Parsons: I’m No Mayor, Let Bloomberg keep the job!
  27. ^ http://www.risingmediagroup.com/images/web%20pdfs/2-20westchester_crusader.pdf
  28. ^ "Naked Cowboy" Wants To Be Mayor of New York City. Associated Press (July 21, 2009).
  29. ^ Naked Cowboy for Mayor
  30. ^ Naked Cowboy Suspends Mayoral Campaign
  31. ^ Adam Lisberg, "Debaters take aim at Mike", New York Daily News, Thursday, August 27, 2009, page 17, and "Bill Thompson and Tony Avella square off, gang up on Mayor Bloomberg in 1st debate", Daily News web-site, Thursday, August 27, 2009, 4:00 AM, retrieved on September 1, 2009
  32. ^ Barbaro, Michael (2009-09-10). "In Mayoral Debate, Heated Words (and Some Gaffes)". The New York Times. p. A38. Retrieved September 16, 2009. 
  33. ^ "For Mayor of New York City". New York Times. Editorial (NYC, NY). 23 October 2009.
  34. ^ Katz, Celeste. "Thompson 2; Bloomberg, 24". New York Daily News. (NYC, NY). 3 September 2009.
  35. ^ Hertzberg, Hendrik. "Biggus Buckus". The New Yorker. (NYC, NY). 9 November 2009.

External links[edit]