New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine

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New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine
Photograph of the school's campus
Motto Hands, Minds, and Hearts[1]
Established 1977
Type Private, non-profit
Dean Wolfgang Gilliar, D.O.[2]
Academic staff 350
Students 1,186[3]
Location Old Westbury, New York, US
40°46′52″N 73°36′01″W / 40.7812°N 73.6003°W / 40.7812; -73.6003Coordinates: 40°46′52″N 73°36′01″W / 40.7812°N 73.6003°W / 40.7812; -73.6003
Campus Suburban
Newspaper www.nycomsga.org/pulse
Colors           Blue and Gold
Website www.nyit.edu/medicine
NYCOM Logo.png

New York Institute of Technology (NYIT) College of Osteopathic Medicine, the osteopathic medical college of the New York Institute of Technology, is located in Old Westbury, Long Island in the U.S. state of New York. Established in 1977 (as the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine), NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine is one of two accredited medical institutions in Nassau County (The other being Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine). On January 1, 2013 the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine, commonly known as NYCOM, changed its 35-year-old name to NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine. The college is accredited by the American Osteopathic Association's Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation (COCA).[3] In the 2011-2012 academic year, NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine had the second largest total enrollment among osteopathic medical schools.[4]

History and founding of the college[edit]

Nelson A. Rockefeller: 41st Vice-President of the United States, 49th Governor of New York State, and Co-Founder of the New York College of Osteopathic Medicine, now known as the NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine.

The college was founded in 1977 through the efforts of Dr. W. Kenneth Riland, New York State Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller and members of Rockefeller family. The college, granted accreditation by the American Osteopathic Association (AOA), was chartered under New York State law through the efforts of Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller. In 1978 Nelson Rockefeller contributed $250,000 to the college's general endowment fund and in 1979 Laurance S. Rockefeller contributed the same amount. The friendship between Nelson Rockefeller and W. Kenneth Riland was an important factor in the founding of the medical college. Dr. Riland served as Mr. Rockefeller’s personal physician during his governorship of New York as well during his vice-presidency in the Ford administration. To honor the efforts and contributions of Governor Rockefeller, the Nelson A. Rockefeller Academic Center was dedicated in 1979. The work of Dr. Philip F. Fleisher, first Dean of the medical college and Dean for the next 16 years, was influential in the growth and success of the school.

New York College of Osteopathic Medicine graduated its first class on June 11, 1981, awarding degrees to 26 men and eight women. The commencement exercises at the college were held on the athletic field of what was once the estate of Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney. The guest speaker, Dr. Theodore Cooper, former dean of Cornell University Medical College, warned of a new atmosphere where "a public is re-evaluating its opinion of physicians.' "The reverence for the doctor is beginning to wane," Dr. Cooper said. An honorary Doctor of Laws degree was awarded to Dr. W. Kenneth Riland, an osteopathic physician, who was then the chairman of the medical college's Board of Governors. Dr. Riland was honored for being a "prime mover" in the establishment of the college. The W. Kenneth Riland Academic Health Care Center, completed in 1984, is located on campus and serves as a clinic and teaching hospital.

In 1999, construction began on campus for the new Hannah and Charles Serota Academic Center. In 2001, the building opened for basic and pre-clinical science lectures, as well as the osteopathic manipulative medicine laboratory.

On December 5, 2012, the 35 year old name of the school was officially changed from New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology (NYCOM of NYIT) to the New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine).[5][6]

Admissions[edit]

According to the college, the matriculants to the Class of 2017 had an average MCAT score of 28 and an average overall GPA of 3.60.[7]

Academics[edit]

W. Kenneth Riland, D.O. Academic Health Care Center: Housing the primary care clinic, study rooms, cafeteria and Gross Anatomy/Neuroanatomy Laboratories.
Hannah and Charles Serota Academic Center: Housing the Office of Pre-Clinical Sciences, Office of Clinical Sciences, Office of Admissions, OMM Laboratory, Office of the Registrar, various administrative offices and 2 large amphitheater lecture halls used for basic science and pre-clinical science lectures.

Degrees Offered:

NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine also has a seven year combined B.S./D.O. program for qualifying high school students through NYIT as well as SUNY New Paltz and SUNY Geneseo.

The New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine has clinical affiliations with hospitals throughout Long Island, Brooklyn, Bronx, Queens, Upstate New York, New Jersey and Connecticut.[3] The college provides physicians educated in countries other than the United States the opportunity to obtain medical training in the United States through its Advanced Program for Emigre Physicians (APEP). After completion of the 4-year APEP program, physicians with foreign credentials receive the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) degree and are able to apply to D.O. and M.D. residency match programs as American graduates. The college provides its alumni and other osteopathic medical graduates with residency and internship training opportunities through the New York Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Educational Consortium (NYCOMEC). All graduates of the college are eligible to apply for ACGME (M.D.), AOA (D.O.), and dually accredited ACGME-AOA residencies.

Affiliated Hospitals
NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine/Academic Health Care Center
NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine/Central Islip (NYIT Campus)
Bassett Healthcare
Benedictine Hospital
Brookdale Hospital Medical Center
Brooklyn Hospital Center
Clara Maass Medical Center
Coney Island Hospital
Danbury Hospital
Frankford Hospital
Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center (West Islip, NY)
Griffin Hospital
Holliswood Hospital
Jamaica Hospital Medical Center
Jersey City Medical Center
Long Beach Medical Center
Lutheran Medical Center
Maimonides Medical Center
Mid-Hudson Family Health Institute
Mountainside Family Medicine
Nassau University Medical Center
Newark Beth Israel Medical Center
North Shore University Hospital- The Sandra Atlas Bass Campus
Long Island Jewish Medical Center (Surgery)
Forest Hills Hospital
Plainview Hospital
Zucker Hillside Hospital (Psychiatry)
Northern Dutchess Hospital
Overlook Hospital
Queens Hospital Center
Saint Barnabas Medical Center (NJ)
Sisters Hospital
St. Barbabas Hospital (Bronx)
St. Luke's Cornwall
South Nassau Communities Hospital
Southampton Hospital
St. Clare's Hospital
St. Vincent's Midtown
Union Hospital
Wilson Memorial Regional Medical Center
Wyckoff Heights Medical Center

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "School Motto | College of Osteopathic Medicine | NYIT". Nyit.edu. 2013-01-30. Retrieved 2013-06-10. 
  2. ^ "Wolfgang Gilliar, D.O., Appointed Dean of College of Osteopathic Medicine". NYIT. Retrieved 24 September 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c "New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology (Nycom/NYIT)". American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine. 2013. Retrieved May 14, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Applications, First-Year Enrollment, Total Enrollment and Graduates by Osteopathic Medical School". American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine. Retrieved 24 September 2012. 
  5. ^ "Renaming Ceremony: Dec. 5". 5 December 2012. Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  6. ^ "NYIT President Speaks at Renaming Ceremony: NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine". 5 December 2012. Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  7. ^ "Frequently Asked Questions". New York College of Osteopathic Medicine. 2013. Retrieved 1 September 2013. 
  8. ^ Jadick, Richard (2007-03-07). "Richard Jadick". NPR. Retrieved 2012-05-26. 
  9. ^ "Dr. Steve Show". WPIX. Retrieved 2012-05-26. 
  10. ^ "Contact Us". FSMB. Retrieved 2012-05-26.