New York Marriott Marquis

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New York Marriott Marquis
Marriott logo gray.png
Ny-marriott-marquis.jpg
Hotel chain Marriott Corporation
General information
Location United States
Address 1535 Broadway, New York City
Coordinates 40°45′33″N 73°59′10″W / 40.759078°N 73.986201°W / 40.759078; -73.986201Coordinates: 40°45′33″N 73°59′10″W / 40.759078°N 73.986201°W / 40.759078; -73.986201
Opening 1985
Cost US$350 million
Management Marriott International
Height 175 m (574 ft)
Technical details
Floor count 49
Floor area 1,844,800 sq ft (171,390 m2)
Design and construction
Architect John Portman & Associates
Other information
Number of rooms 1,892
Number of suites 57
Number of restaurants The View Restaurant & Lounge
Broadway Lounge
Crossroads, An American Kitchen & Bar
Parking US$55 daily
Website
http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/nycmq-new-york-marriott-marquis/
New York Marriott Marquis at CTBUH Skyscraper Database[1][2][3]

New York Marriott Marquis is a Marriott International hotel at 1535 Broadway opened in 1985 and was designed by architect John Portman. It is located on Times Square at Broadway and 45th Street. The hotel is famous for its high-tech elevators and atrium lobby rising 45 stories to "The View", New York's only rooftop revolving restaurant and lounge. With 1,949 rooms and over 100,000 sq ft (9,300 m2) of meeting space, it is one of the largest hotels in the city. The Marquis Theatre is located within the hotel at the 3rd floor. Room rates range from $349 to $3,500 per night.

Creation[edit]

The hotel was born in controversy because five historic theaters—the Helen Hayes, the Morosco, the Astor, the Bijou, and the Gaiety—were demolished to clear the site. Protesters, including Christopher Reeve (then at the height of his Superman fame) tried to stop the destruction, even forcing a Supreme Court challenge, but it was too late. What was dubbed "The Great Theater Massacre of 1982" went forward to make way for the hotel. The Marquis was approved for construction but with the requirement that a new theater (now the Marquis Theater) be built on the same site. By the time construction began, the original operators Western International Hotels (today Westin) had dropped out of the project and Marriott had stepped in.

The hotel has been criticized for turning its back to Times Square. However, at the time the hotel was built, Times Square was only beginning to turn around. With the still-seedy character of Times Square, Portman's style of inwardly-oriented spaces made logical sense. The present redevelopment of Times Square as an urban destination point has left the Marriott Marquis detached from the street. However, the Marriott was the first major project in the Times Square revitalization, and has been credited as the starting point for today's development node at Times Square.

The hotel has 36 guest room floors and features an award-winning restaurant on the top floor called "The View".

The hotel is served by twelve scenic elevators, which are famous for facing into an atrium that stretches the height of the hotel. The cabs travel at 1,000 ft (300 m) per minute. They received a major modernization in 2005 that included replacing the cabs and reducing waiting times from originally more than 30 minute in the past down to less than 5 minutes.s[4] Currently, the building boasts Schindler Group's Miconic 10 destination dispatch computer technology, which allows people to key in their destination floor number on a keypad and get assigned an elevator to use afterward. The cab interior still contains a floor button panel, but it is designed for firefighter use and is hidden under a locked panel. Sometimes, the firefighter panel is unlocked, letting the guests and employees select their floor from there. The elevators are also useful because they have handicapped mode. What that does is before the person enters their destination they will have to press the wheelchair button then the destination. Then the system will talk and a sound signal will come out of a speaker next to the car announcing the name of the car. For example the person enters their destination and then the system would say "Doors open Car A." It would also say "Doors closing".[5]

At the time the hotel was built, it featured Manhattan's largest grand ballroom and its first revolving restaurant, a three-story, 1,500-seat theater, a second and third ballroom, and 100,000 square feet (9,300 m2) of meeting, banquet and exhibition spaces.

Gallery[edit]

Looking up at the atrium 
New York Marriott Marquis, circa 1999 
Atrium View 

References[edit]

  1. ^ New York Marriott Marquis at Emporis
  2. ^ New York Marriott Marquis at SkyscraperPage
  3. ^ New York Marriott Marquis at Structurae
  4. ^ Melanie D.G. Kaplan (July 17, 2012). "Intelligent elevators answer vertical challenges". Smart Planet. Retrieved 27 June 2013. 
  5. ^ http://www.elevatordrives.com/pdfs/poy2_marriott.pdf Project of The Year- Category 2:New York Marriott Marquis

Further reading[edit]

  • Nash, Eric P., Jr. (1999). Manhattan Skyscrapers. Princeton Architectural Press. ISBN 1-56898-181-3. 

External links[edit]