New York Psychoanalytic Society

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247 East 82nd Street, Manhattan

The New York Psychoanalytic Society and Institute — founded in 1911 by Dr. Abraham A. Brill — is the oldest psychoanalytic organization in the United States.[1][2]

The charter members were: Louis Edward Bisch, Brill, Horace Westlake Frink, Frederick James Farnell, William C. Garvin, August Hoch, Morris J. Karpas, George H. Kirby, Clarence P. Oberndorf, Bronislaw Onuf, Ernest Marsh Poate, Charles Ricksher, Jacob Rosenbloom, Edward W. Scripture and Samuel A. Tannenbaum.[3]

The institute was a professional home to some of the leaders in psychoanalytic education and treatment, such as Margaret Mahler, Ernst Kris, Kurt Eissler, Heinz Hartmann, Abram Kardiner, Rudolph Loewenstein, Charles Brenner, and Otto Kernberg.

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Official Web Site — About Page
  2. ^ Saki Knafo (9 September 2007). "Patching Up the Frayed Couch". New York Times. Retrieved 24 November 2008. 
  3. ^ Jacques M. Quen, Eric T. Carlson, Adolf Meyer, New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. Section on the History of Psychiatry and the Behavioral Sciences: American psychoanalysis, origins and development: the Adolf Meyer seminars. Brunner/Mazel, 1978 p. 86