New York State Inebriate Asylum

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New York State Inebriate Asylum
Binginebriateasylum.jpg
The New York State Inebriate Asylum, as it appeared in 1882
New York State Inebriate Asylum is located in New York
New York State Inebriate Asylum
Location 425 Robinson St., Binghamton, NY
Coordinates 42°6′23.3274″N 75°51′56.7″W / 42.106479833°N 75.865750°W / 42.106479833; -75.865750Coordinates: 42°6′23.3274″N 75°51′56.7″W / 42.106479833°N 75.865750°W / 42.106479833; -75.865750
Built 1858
Architect Isaac G. Perry
Architectural style Gothic Revival
Governing body State
NRHP Reference # 96000814
Significant dates
Added to NRHP July 24, 1996[1]
Designated NHL December 9, 1997[2]

The New York State Inebriate Asylum, later known as Binghamton State Hospital, was the first institution designed and constructed to treat alcoholism as a mental disorder.[2][3] Located in Binghamton, NY, its imposing Gothic Revival exterior was designed by New York architect Isaac G. Perry and construction was completed in 1864. In 1993 the main building was closed due to safety concerns. The asylum appears on both the state and national lists of Historic Places, but it is currently in a state of disrepair and is one of the most endangered historical places in the nation, according to the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

The building was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1997.[2][3] It is located at 425 Robinson Street, in Binghamton, New York and is owned by Upstate Medical University, Clinical Campus. The 1858 asylum is currently under phase 1 renovation, funded by 12.45 million dollars provided by the New York State Legislature. A Binghamton Clinical Campus Expansion Campaign Fund 04550 exists for Phase 2 renovation to serve as headquarters for the Binghamton Clinical Campus and physician assistant program.[4]

New York State Inebriate Asylum as of 2010
New York State Inebriate Asylum as of 2010

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2007-01-23. 
  2. ^ a b c "New York State Inebriate Asylum". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. 2007-09-15. 
  3. ^ a b Laura A. Kimball, Karla M. Eisch, and Wesley Haynes (July 1997). "National Historic Landmark Nomination: New York State Inebriate Asylum" (pdf). National Park Service. 
  4. ^ "Noble Purpose". Upstate Medical Center. November 2008. p. 7. 

External links[edit]