New York State Route 130

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NYS Route 130 marker

NYS Route 130
Broadway

Map of Erie County in western New York with NY 130 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by NYSDOT
Length: 6.06 mi[3] (9.75 km)
Existed: c. 1938[1][2] – present
Major junctions
West end: US 62 in Buffalo
East end: US 20 / NY 78 in Depew
Location
Counties: Erie
Highway system
NY 129 NY 131

New York State Route 130 (NY 130) is a state highway entirely within Erie County, New York, in the United States. It runs east–west from U.S. Route 62 (US 62, named Bailey Avenue) in Buffalo to the village of Depew, where it terminates at NY 78 (Transit Road). Throughout this course, NY 130 is named Broadway, a roadway name that continues eastward beyond Depew even after NY 130 ends.

Route description[edit]

NY 130 westbound approaching the interchange with NY 240 in Cheektowaga

NY 130 begins at an intersection with US 62 (Bailey Avenue) in the East Side of downtown Buffalo as a touring route continuation of Broadway. NY 130 proceeds eastward through Buffalo as a four-lane commercial/industrial roadway on the south side of a railroad yard complex maintained by CSX in Schiller Park. The route bends southeast, crosses under a CSX line also used by Amtrak, soon bending east once again. During this eastern stretch, NY 130 is a residential street to the south in the town of Cheektowaga while running alongside the railroad yard. At the end of the railroad yard, NY 130 intersects with access ramps to NY 240 (Harlem Road). Running northeast through Cheektowaga, NY 130 runs along the railroad line as it proceeds eastward, crossing north of several industrial sites and south of cemeteries.[4]

A short distance later, as NY 130 continues through Cheektowaga, it crosses over the New York State Thruway (I-90) just south of exit 52. Bending eastward, NY 130 enters the hamlet of Forks, where it interchanges with NY 277 (Union Road) via access ramps. After the interchange, NY 130 bends away from the railroad tracks, running eastward as a four-lane residential/commercial street. Approaching another set of railroad tracks, the route bends northeast alongside, entering the village of Depew, where it intersects with County Route 317 (CR 317; Dick Road), which connects to the Buffalo-Depew Amtrak station. After the junction with CR 317, NY 130 bends southeast, crosses under the second set of railroad tracks and continues east through Depew as Broadway.[4]

NY 130 westbound through the village of Depew after NY 78/US 20

NY 130 continues east, passing a large industrial lot before turning southeast once again into a commercial district. At an intersection with CR 322 (Borden Road) and A Street, the route enters downtown Depew. Through downtown Depew, NY 130 is a four-lane residential street, passing several businesses on its way east. As the Cayuga Creek approaches the roadside, NY 130 intersects with NY 78 and US 20 (Transit Road), where NY 130 terminates and US 20 continues east along Broadway.[4]

History[edit]

When the first set of posted routes in New York were assigned in 1924, Broadway in Buffalo and points east became part of NY 5, a cross-state highway extending from the Pennsylvania state line northeast of Erie, Pennsylvania, to the Massachusetts state line west of Pittsfield, Massachusetts.[5] By 1926, NY 5 had been shifted northward between Buffalo and Albany[6] to follow what had previously been NY 5A.[5] The former routing of NY 5 between the two cities became NY 7.[6] In 1927, the portion of NY 7 between Buffalo and Canawaugus (west of Avon) was renumbered again to NY 35.[7]

US 20 was assigned in 1927; however, it initially bypassed downtown Buffalo on modern US 20A.[7] It was realigned c. 1938 to enter the eastern suburbs of Buffalo by way of Southwestern Boulevard and Transit Road. At Broadway, US 20 turned east onto what had been NY 35 and exited the city. The former routing of NY 35 to Niagara Square in downtown Buffalo was redesignated as NY 130.[1][2] NY 130 was truncated to US 62 in the mid-1970s.[8][9] The former section from Washington Street (four blocks east of Niagara Square) to US 62 is still maintained by NYSDOT as NY 954L, an unsigned reference route.[10]

Major intersections[edit]

The entire route is in Erie County.

Location Mile[3] km Destinations Notes
Buffalo 0.00 0.00 US 62 (Bailey Avenue)
West Seneca 1.54 2.48 NY 240 (Harlem Road)
Cheektowaga 3.06 4.92 NY 277 (Union Road)
Depew 6.06 9.75 US 20 / NY 78 (Transit Road)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Standard Oil Company (1937). New York (Map). Cartography by General Drafting.
  2. ^ a b Esso (1938). New York Road Map for 1938 (Map). Cartography by General Drafting.
  3. ^ a b "2008 Traffic Volume Report for New York State" (PDF). New York State Department of Transportation. June 16, 2009. p. 168. Retrieved February 1, 2010. 
  4. ^ a b c Microsoft. "overview map of NY 130". Bing Maps (Map). Cartography by Nokia. http://binged.it/MytlfC. Retrieved May 20, 2012.
  5. ^ a b "New York's Main Highways Designated by Numbers". The New York Times. December 21, 1924. p. XX9. 
  6. ^ a b Rand McNally and Company (1926). Rand McNally Auto Road Atlas (western New York) (Map). http://www.broermapsonline.org/members/NorthAmerica/UnitedStates/Midatlantic/NewYork/unitedstates1926ra_008.html. Retrieved May 27, 2009.
  7. ^ a b Automobile Blue Book 1 (1927 ed.). Chicago: Automobile Blue Book, Inc. 1927.  This edition shows U.S. Routes as they were first officially signed in 1927.
  8. ^ Shell Oil Company (1973). New York (Map). Cartography by H.M. Gousha Company (1973 ed.).
  9. ^ Exxon (1977). New York (Map). Cartography by General Drafting (1977–78 ed.).
  10. ^ New York State Department of Transportation (January 2012). Official Description of Highway Touring Routes, Bicycling Touring Routes, Scenic Byways, & Commemorative/Memorial Designations in New York State (PDF). Retrieved January 31, 2012. 

External links[edit]