New York State Route 25B

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NYS Route 25B marker

NYS Route 25B
Hillside Avenue
Map of New York State Route 25B
Map of Long Island with NY 25B highlighted in red
Route information
Auxiliary route of NY 25
Maintained by NYSDOT, Nassau County and NYCDOT
Length: 7.25 mi[3] (11.67 km)
Existed: c. 1935[1][2] – present
Major junctions
West end: NY 25 in Queens Village
  Cross Island Pkwy. in Bellerose
East end: NY 25 in Westbury
Location
Counties: Queens, Nassau
Highway system
NY 25A NY 25C

New York State Route 25B (NY 25B) is a 7.25-mile (11.67 km) east–west state highway located on Long Island in New York, United States. The western terminus of the route is at an intersection with NY 25 in Queens. The eastern terminus is at an interchange with NY 25 in Westbury, Nassau County. NY 25B is named Hillside Avenue for its entire length, except for a brief portion in the village of East Williston, where it is called East Williston Avenue.

The route, assigned in the mid-1930s, acts as a northern alternate to NY 25, running parallel to its parent for its entire length. Unlike NY 25, which is four lanes wide for most of its length between Queens and Westbury, NY 25B has a number of lane configurations, including six lanes in Queens, four lanes in western Nassau County, and two lanes in East Williston. The route also connects NY 25 to the villages of Williston Park and East Williston.

Route description[edit]

NY 25B is maintained by the New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) within Queens[4] and by Nassau County within the village of East Williston, where the route is co-designated but not signed as County Route 85. The remainder of the route is state-maintained.[5]

Queens[edit]

Hillside Avenue changes designations from NY 25 to NY 25B at an intersection with Braddock Avenue in the Queens neighborhood of Queens Village. Here, NY 25 turns right onto Braddock while NY 25B begins and follows Hillside Avenue to the northeast. The road, a six-lane divided highway with a large, tree-lined median in the vicinity of the junction with Braddock Avenue, begins to narrow after intersecting 229th Street, passing the Martin Van Buren High School as the median is reduced to a single turning lane. At 232nd Street, the street turns to the east for three blocks before curving to the southeast at Winchester Boulevard.[6]

Fading NY 25B shield in Queens

The lane composition of NY 25B remains the same as it proceeds eastward through heavily residential areas of Queens, maintaining a width of six lanes with a turning lane acting as the divider between opposing traffic. Roughly 0.6 miles (1.0 km) from Winchester Boulevard, NY 25B, facing northeast once more, intersects the west (southbound) frontage road of the Cross Island Parkway in Bellerose. Shortly after passing over the six-lane parkway, Hillside Avenue meets the eastern (northbound) frontage road. East of the parkway and surrounded by homes once again, NY 25B heads northeast on a linear path for a half-mile to an intersection with the Little Neck Parkway. Upon crossing the parkway, the structures along Hillside Avenue shift from residential to commercial, a trend that remains in place to the Nassau County line.[6]

Nassau County[edit]

At the county line, NY 25B breaks from its previous east-northeast alignment and takes a more pronounced northeast routing through New Hyde Park. The road narrows as well, decreasing to four lanes excluding the center turning lane, with an extended shoulder taking the place of the two lost lanes. A half-mile from the county line, NY 25B enters North New Hyde Park, intersecting Lakeville Road in the center. Two blocks from Lakeville, the commercial buildings give way to residential dwellings for seven blocks before returning at the intersection of New Hyde Park Road and Hillside Avenue.[6]

Nassau County police station along NY 25B in Williston Park

Past New Hyde Park Road, the buildings surrounding NY 25B become a balanced mix of commercial and residential structures. Less than a quarter of a mile from New Hyde Park Road, the road makes a turn eastward, passing to the north of the Hillside Public Library as it curves to the right. After three blocks of homes, a flurry of businesses precede a junction with Marcus Avenue,[6] formerly part of NY 25C.[7] The commercial presence continues for two blocks eastward before shifting back to residential structures. The four-lane NY 25B, along with a separate, parallel Hillside Avenue South, continue eastward through blocks of primarily homes to Herricks Road, where the composition of structures along NY 25B becomes a mix of commercial buildings and residential dwellings once more. Hillside Avenue continues on, entering Williston Park. On the eastern edge of the village, NY 25B narrows to two lanes as it crosses the Oyster Bay Branch of the Long Island Rail Road and enters East Williston, where the surroundings shift to residential for the final time.[6]

In the center of the village, NY 25B intersects Roslyn Road before passing by the North Side School two blocks to the east. Roughly a half-mile from the school, NY 25B enters the village of Old Westbury and passes over the eight-lane Northern State Parkway with no connection between the two. The missing link is filled by way of Glen Cove Road, which NY 25B intersects a mere 150 yards (140 m) from the parkway, and Jericho Turnpike (NY 25), accessible via Glen Cove Road. East of Glen Cove Road, NY 25B enters Westbury and begins to develop a large median in preparation for an interchange with NY 25 roughly 0.3 miles (0.5 km) to the east. Just west of the interchange, NY 25B intersects Bacon Road. 100 yards (91 m) from the intersection, NY 25B crosses over NY 25 west and enters the median of NY 25 prior to merging with NY 25 east, ending the NY 25B designation.[6]

History[edit]

New York City did not have posted routes until mid-December 1934. Several routes that had ended at the eastern city line (the QueensNassau County border), such as NY 25, were extended westward at this time.[1] By the following year, NY 25B was assigned to the portion of Hillside Avenue between Braddock Avenue in Queens and Jericho Turnpike in Westbury, serving as a northerly alternate route of NY 25 between the two locations.[2] The alignment of the route has not been changed since that time.[3] The junction at the east end of the route was originally an at-grade intersection.[8] It was reconfigured into an interchange c. 1967.[9]

Major intersections[edit]

County Location Mile[3] km Destinations Notes
Queens Queens Village 0.00 0.00 NY 25 / Springfield Boulevard Western terminus
Bellerose 1.20 1.93 Cross Island Pkwy. Exit 28A (Cross Island Parkway)
Nassau New Hyde Park 4.00 6.44 Marcus Avenue Former eastern terminus of NY 25C
Old Westbury 6.79 10.93 Northern Pkwy Shield.svg NY-25.svg Glen Cove Road to Northern State Parkway / NY 25
Westbury 7.25 11.67 NY 25 east Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Mark Ways in the City". The New York Times. December 16, 1934. 
  2. ^ a b Sun Oil Company (1935). Road Map & Historical Guide – New York (Map). Cartography by Rand McNally and Company.
  3. ^ a b c "2008 Traffic Volume Report for New York State" (PDF). New York State Department of Transportation. June 16, 2009. p. 78. Retrieved January 30, 2010. 
  4. ^ "Queens County Inventory Listing" (CSV). New York State Department of Transportation. February 28, 2012. Retrieved December 28, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Nassau County Inventory Listing" (CSV). New York State Department of Transportation. February 28, 2012. Retrieved December 28, 2012. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f Google Inc. "overview map of NY 25B". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=Braddock+Ave&daddr=40.747345,-73.6865185+to:Jericho+Turnpike&hl=en&ll=40.744266,-73.678436&spn=0.097802,0.222988&sll=40.759822,-73.612336&sspn=0.006111,0.013937&geocode=FT9-bQIdJ8Ka-w%3BFVHBbQIdCqKb-ykxwq6DnGLCiTGWuUWkALWw5w%3BFdP0bQIdysCc-w&gl=us&mra=me&mrsp=1,0&sz=17&t=h&z=13&via=1. Retrieved December 28, 2012.
  7. ^ American Automobile Association (1968). New York City and Vicinity including Long Island (Map) (1968–69 ed.).
  8. ^ Sunoco (1961). New York and Metropolitan New York (Map). Cartography by H.M. Gousha Company (1961–62 ed.).
  9. ^ Staff (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 1060770". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved December 28, 2012. 

External links[edit]