New York state election, 1887

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The 1887 New York state election was held on November 8, 1887, to elect the Secretary of State, the State Comptroller, the Attorney General, the State Treasurer and the State Engineer, as well as all members of the New York State Assembly and the New York State Senate.

History[edit]

The United Labor state convention met on August 17 at Syracuse, New York. Louis F. Post, the Greenback candidate for Attorney General in 1883, was elected Temporary Chairman by the Henry George faction with 91 votes over Frank J. Ferrall, a "colored delegate from New York City", who was nominated by William Penn Rogers and received 69 votes.[1] The convention lasted another two days, and nominated Henry George for Secretary of State, Victor A. Wilder for Comptroller, Patrick H. Cummins for Treasurer, Dennis C. Feely for Attorney General, and Sylvanus H. Sweet for State Engineer.[2] Ex-State Engineer Sweet (in office 1874-1875 as a Democrat) declined to run.[3]

The Prohibition state convention met on August 25 at Syracuse, New York. Rev. I. K. Funk was Temporary Chairman until the choice of Henry Clay Bascom as President.[4]

The Republican state convention met on September 14 at the Skating Rink in Saratoga, New York. Seth Low was Temporary Chairman until the choice of Warner Miller as President. Frederick D. Grant was nominated for Secretary of State by acclamation. Jesse S. L'Amoreaux was nominated for Comptroller during the first ballot. James H. Carmicheal, of Buffalo, was nominated for Treasurer. Maj. James A. Dennison, of Fulton County, was nominated for Attorney General during the first ballot. Oliver H. P. Cornell was nominated for State Engineer on the first ballot (vote: Cornell 353, Verplanck Colvin 326).[5]

The Democratic state convention met at Saratoga, New York.

The Progressive Labor state convention met on September 28 at Webster Hall in New York City. William Penn Rogers, called the meeting to order, and made a speech repudiating Henry George and his United Labor Party. H. A. Barker was Temporary Chairman and Chairman of the day session; George Block was Chairman of the evening session. John Swinton was nominated for Secretary of State. H. A. Barker, a cigarmaker of Albany, was nominated for Comptroller. Henry Emrich, General Secretary of the Furniture Workers Union, was nominated for Treasurer. Thaddeus B. Wakeman was nominated for Attorney General.[6] Swinton declined to run, and the convention nominated J. Edward Hall for Secretary of State.[7]

The Greenback-Labor state convention met on October 4 at Albany, New York, and nominated Thomas K. Beecher for Secretary of State.[8]

Results[edit]

The whole Democratic ticket was elected.

The incumbents Cook and Fitzgerald were re-elected.

1887 state election results
Ticket / Office Secretary of State Comptroller Attorney General Treasurer State Engineer
Democratic Frederick Cook
469,888
Edward Wemple Charles F. Tabor Lawrence J. Fitzgerald John Bogart
Republican Frederick D. Grant
452,881
Jesse S. L'Amoreaux[9] James A. Dennison James H. Carmichael Oliver H. P. Cornell[10]
United Labor Henry George
70,005
Victor A. Wilder[11] Dennis C. Feely[12] Patrick H. Cummins[13] Matthew K. Couzens
Prohibition D. W. C. Huntington[14]
41,850
C. B. Hitchcock Silas W. Mason[15] William W. Smith[16] John G. Gray
Greenback Thomas K. Beecher[17] Sylvester Tripp (none) J. Madison Hall[18] Edwin A. Stillman[19]
Progressive Labor J. Edward Hall Herbert A. Barker Thaddeus B. Wakeman[20] Henry Emerich R. F. Barnes
Union Labor Orville Preston Ashbel Clapp Wauhlin B. Bernard John J. Ryan R. F. Barnes
Reform D. W. C. Huntington Edward Evans[21] C. H. Hammond S. M. Douglas Cyrus K. Porter

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ HENRY GEORGE AS A BOSS HIS DISMAL FAILURE IN RUNNING A CONVENTION in NYT on August 18, 1887
  2. ^ GEORGE HEADS THE TICKET AND THE CONVENTION ADOPTS HIS PLATFORM in NYT on August 20, 1887
  3. ^ MR. SWEET WILL NOT RUN in NYT on August 28, 1887
  4. ^ CONSCIENCE IN POLITICS; THE PROHIBITION PARTY'S STATE CONVENTION in NYT on August 26, 1887
  5. ^ THE MAGIC NAME OF GRANT; PLACED AT THE HEAD OF THE REPUBLICAN TICKET in NYT on September 15, 1887
  6. ^ THEY NOMINATE SWINTON; WORK OF THE PROGRESSIVE LABOR CONVENTION in NYT on September 29, 1887
  7. ^ JOHN SWINTON DECLINES in NYT on September 30, 1887
  8. ^ MR. BEECHER'S POSITION in NYT on October 6, 1887
  9. ^ Jesse Seymour L'Amoreaux (1837-1918), lawyer, of Ballston Spa, Obit in NYT on June 5, 1918
  10. ^ Oliver H. Cornell (b. ca. 1842), brother of Alonzo B. Cornell, graduated from Cornell University, ran also in 1875
  11. ^ Victor A. Wilder (b. ca. 1846 in Cutler, Maine), of Brooklyn, Civil war veteran, Treasurer of the New York Railway Supply Co.
  12. ^ Dennis C. Feely (b. ca. 1837), lawyer, of Rochester, ran also on Greenback ticket in 1881
  13. ^ Patrick H. Cummins (b. ca. 1847), a "dealer in boots and shoes", of Amsterdam
  14. ^ DeWitt Clinton Huntington, DD (1830-1912), later Chancellor of Nebraska Wesleyan University
  15. ^ Silas W. Mason, of Chautauqua County, ran also for the Court of Appeals in 1890 and 1893
  16. ^ William W. Smith, of Poughkeepsie, ran also for Comptroller in 1891, for Secretary of State in 1895, and for Governor in 1896
  17. ^ Rev. Thomas Kinnicut Beecher (1824-1900), of Elmira, brother of Henry Ward Beecher, ran also in 1883 and 1889, Obit in NYT on March 15, 1900
  18. ^ James Madison Hall, of Madison County, ran also in 1889
  19. ^ Edwin A. Stillman, of Canadice, ran also in 1883 and 1885
  20. ^ Thaddeus Burr Wakeman (1834-1913), lawyer, author, ran also in 1893, for the Court of Appeals in 1894, and for Secretary of State in 1895
  21. ^ Edward Evans, ran also for Secretary of State on Prohibition ticket in 1885

Sources[edit]

See also[edit]