New Zealand Truth

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The New Zealand Truth
Format Tabloid
Editor Cameron Slater
Founded 1887
Political alignment Centre-right
Ceased publication 2013
Headquarters Auckland, New Zealand
Official website truth.co.nz

The New Zealand Truth was a tabloid newspaper published weekly in New Zealand. It started as the Auckland Truth in 1887.[1][2]

The editor from 1913 to 1925 was Robert Hogg a Scottish-born journalist and socialist.[3]

Described as "scandal mongering" and "scurrilious", it has employed well-known New Zealand authors, including Robin Hyde in 1928.[4] It included publication of a page 3 girl. When divorces were processed in public courts (from 1982 they were processed in the Family Court), some of the more salacious divorces were reported on page 5.

At the end of October 2012, controversial right-wing blogger Cameron Slater was announced as the paper's new editor. He said in his new role he would be "kicking arse and sticking up for the little guy". His first issue was published that November. [5] As a result of his appointment, the paper's left-wing columnist Martyn "Bomber" Bradbury quit. Within six months of Slater's appointment it was announced the publication would cease production in July 2013, with Slater claiming it was "too far gone". [6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "New Zealand and Pacific Newspapers and Magazines (University of Auckland newspaper holdings on microfilm)". 
  2. ^ Te Reo Newsletter 10 (1). New Zealand Society of Genealogists. February 2003. p. 10. 
  3. ^ Gustafson, Barry (1980). Labour’s Path to Political Independence. Auckland: Auckland University Press. p. 158. ISBN 0-19-647986-X. 
  4. ^ "Robin Hyde (Iris Wilkinson), 1906–1939". New Zealand Electronic Text Centre. Victoria University of Wellington. 2007. 
  5. ^ "Cameron Slater takes helm of Truth". 3 News NZ. 30 October. 
  6. ^ "NZ Truth to cease publishing after 125 years - reports". New Zealand Herald. 17 July 2013. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Truth: The rise and fall of the people's paper by Redmer Yska (2010), Craig Potton Publishing, Nelson

External links[edit]