Newark Public Schools

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Newark Public Schools
Superintendent: Cami Anderson
Business Administrator: Valerie Wilson
Address: 2 Cedar Street
Newark, NJ 07102
Grade Range: K-12
School facilities: 75
Enrollment: 39,443 (as of 2009-10)[1]
Faculty (in FTEs): 2,685
Student–teacher ratio: 14.69:1
District Factor Group: A
Web site: http://www.nps.k12.nj.us
Ind. Per Pupil District
Spending
Rank
(*)
K-12
Average
 %± vs.
Average
1 Budgetary Cost 19,305 105 13,632 41.6%
2 Classroom Instruction 10,147 100 8,035 26.3%
6 Support Services 4,357 104 2,166 101.2%
8 Administrative Cost 1,617 92 1,379 17.3%
10 Operations & Maintenance 2,722 103 1,674 62.6%
13 Extracurricular Activities 228 54 258 -11.6%
16 Median Teacher Salary 66,200 85 57,597
Data from NJDoE 2009 Taxpayers' Guide to Education Spending.[2]
*Of K-12 districts with 3,501+ students. Lowest spending=1; Highest=105

Newark Public Schools is a comprehensive community public school district that serves the entire city of Newark, New Jersey. The district is one of 31 Abbott districts statewide,[3] which are now referred to as "SDA Districts" based on the requirement for the state to cover all costs for school building and renovation projects in these districts under the supervision of the New Jersey Schools Development Authority.[4][5]

As of the 2009-10 school year, the district's 75 schools had an enrollment of 39,443 students and 2,685 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 14.69:1.[1]

The total school enrollment in Newark city was 75,000 in 2003. Preprimary school enrollment was 12,000 and elementary or high school enrollment was 46,000 children. College enrollment was 16,000.

As of 2003, 64 percent of people 25 years and over had at least graduated from high school and 11 percent had a bachelor's degree or higher. Among people 16 to 19 years old, 10 percent were dropouts; they were not enrolled in school and had not graduated from high school.[6]

The district is classified by the New Jersey Department of Education as being in District Factor Group "A", the lowest of eight groupings. District Factor Groups organize districts statewide to allow comparison by common socioeconomic characteristics of the local districts. From lowest socioeconomic status to highest, the categories are A, B, CD, DE, FG, GH, I and J.[7]

The district is one of three districts in New Jersey (along with Jersey City Public Schools and Paterson Public Schools) under "state intervention", which authorizes the state Commissioner of Education to intervene in governance of a local public school district (and to intervene in the areas of instruction and program, operations, personnel, and fiscal management).[8]

Performance[edit]

Newark Public Schools is the largest school system in New Jersey. The city's public schools are among the lowest-performing in the state, even after the state government took over management of the city's schools in 1995, which was done under the presumption that improvement would follow.

Although the school district continues to struggle with low high school graduation rates and low standardized test scores, the mayor of Newark, Cory Booker, insists, "Newark, New Jersey can become one of the first American cities to solve the crisis in public education."[9] This vision for better school district is also shared by Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, who made a $100 million donation to Newark Public Schools in 2010. "Every child deserves a good education. Right now that's not happening," he says.[10] The management has been criticized: while interviews with administration regarding Newark's schools were always positive, highlighting, of course, only the good aspects of the huge monetary donation, new contracts were being created, money was being hemorrhaged, and the district was going broke.[11][12] According to The New Yorker, Anderson, Booker, Zuckerberg, and Christie, "despite millions of dollars spent on community engagement—have yet to hold tough, open conversations with the people of Newark about exactly how much money the district has, where it is going, and what students aren’t getting as a result."

Excellence, Efficiency, and Equity are the three goals set by the Newark Public Schools system in hopes to improve the academic situation in the city. These goals are listed and described on The Newark Public Schools District website as follows:

  • Excellence – All students deserve a school that gets them on a path to college or a great career.
  • Efficiency – Every possible dollar should be invested in staff and programs that will make a positive difference for our students.
  • Equity – Every student should have access to an excellent school no matter what.[13]

Awards, recognition and rankings[edit]

Ann Street School of Mathematics and Science was awarded the Blue Ribbon School Award of Excellence by the United States Department of Education, the highest award an American school can receive, during the 1998-99 school year.[14]

Branch Brook Elementary School, a PreKindergarten through 4th grade school, was awarded the Blue Ribbon School Award of Excellence, during the 2004-05 school year.[15]

During the 2007-08 school year, Harriet Tubman School was recognized with the Blue Ribbon School Award of Excellence by the United States Department of Education.[16][17]

During the 2009-10 school year, Science Park High School was awarded the Blue Ribbon School Award of Excellence.[18]

For the 2005-06 school year, the district was recognized with the "Best Practices Award" by the New Jersey Department of Education for its "A Park Study: Learning About the World Around Us" Science program at Abington Avenue School. The curriculum was written, implemented, and submitted to the State of New Jersey by Abington Avenue School kindergarten teacher, Lenore Furman.[19]

After efforts at his dismissal as New Jersey's poet laureate, Amiri Baraka was named the school district's poet laureate in December 2002.[20]

Schools[edit]

Primary schools[edit]

Pre-K only[edit]

Pre-K - K[edit]

Pre-K - 4th grade[edit]

Pre-K - 5th grade[edit]

Pre-K - 6th grade[edit]

Pre-K - 7th grade[edit]

Pre-K - 8th grade[edit]

K - 2nd grade[edit]

K - 4th grade[edit]

K - 5th grade[edit]

K - 7th grade[edit]

K - 8th grade[edit]

1st - 7th grade[edit]

Middle schools[edit]

3rd - 8th grades[edit]

5th - 8th grades[edit]

6th - 8th grades[edit]

8th grade[edit]

Secondary schools[edit]

6th - 12th grades[edit]

7th - 12th grades[edit]

High schools (9th - 12th grades)[edit]

Ungraded[edit]

Administration[edit]

Core members of the district's administration are:[21]

  • Cami Anderson, State District Superintendent of Schools[22]
  • Valerie Wilson, School Business Administrator[23]

State intervention[edit]

The district is one of three districts in New Jersey under "state intervention", which authorizes the Commissioner of Education to intervene in governance of a local public school district (and to intervene in the areas of instruction and program, operations, personnel, and fiscal management) if the Commissioner has determined that a school district failed or was unable to take corrective actions necessary to establish a thorough and efficient system of education.[8]

School uniforms[edit]

Beginning in the 2008-2009 school year, students in elementary and middle school are required to wear school uniforms.[24] Beginning in September 2010 high school students will be required to wear uniforms.[25]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b District information for the Newark School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed August 15, 2012.
  2. ^ Taxpayers' Guide to Education Spending April 2013, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed April 15, 2013.
  3. ^ Abbott Districts, New Jersey Department of Education, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 15, 2009. Accessed August 15, 2012.
  4. ^ What are SDA Districts?, New Jersey Schools Development Authority. Accessed August 15, 2012. "SDA Districts are 31 special-needs school districts throughout New Jersey. They were formerly known as Abbott Districts, based on the Abbott v. Burke case in which the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that the State must provide 100 percent funding for all school renovation and construction projects in special-needs school districts.... The districts were renamed after the elimination of the Abbott designation through passage of the state’s new School Funding Formula in January 2008."
  5. ^ SDA Districts, New Jersey Schools Development Authority. Accessed August 15, 2012.
  6. ^ US Census
  7. ^ NJ Department of Education District Factor Groups (DFG) for School Districts, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 27, 2009.
  8. ^ a b Governance and Urban School Improvement: Lessons for New Jersey From Nine Cities. Institute on Education Law and Policy, Rutgers–Newark. October 2010. pp. 65–68. 
  9. ^ Booker, Cory (September 25, 2010). "A Historic Opportunity". Huffington Post. Retrieved 7 April 2013. 
  10. ^ Sahba, Amy (September 24, 2010). "Facebook founder announces $100 million donation". Retrieved 7 April 2013. 
  11. ^ Russakoff, Dale (19 May 2014). "Schooled: Cory Booker, Chris Christie, and Mark Zuckerberg had a plan to reform Newark’s schools; They got an education". The New Yorker. 
  12. ^ "Was Zuckerberg's $100M school gift a waste?". MSN Money. 14 May 2014. 
  13. ^ "Newark Public Schools: A Vision for our Students, our Schools, our Success". Retrieved 7 April 2013. 
  14. ^ Blue Ribbon Schools Program: Schools Recognized 1982-1983 through 1999-2002 (PDF), accessed May 11, 2006.
  15. ^ U.S. Department of Education Blue Ribbon Schools Program: Schools Recognized 2003 through 2005 (PDF), accessed June 5, 2006.
  16. ^ Addison, Kasi; and Juri, Carmen. "Three Essex schools capture blue ribbon", The Star-Ledger, October 7, 2007. Accessed October 14, 2007. "Principals in three Essex County schools found out last week their buildings joined an exclusive club of exemplary schools when the U.S. Department of Education named the nation's latest batch of No Child Left Behind -- Blue Ribbon Schools.... The three Essex County schools are Oakview School in Bloomfield, Millburn High School and Harriet Tubman School in Newark."
  17. ^ No Child Left Behind - Blue Ribbon Schools Program: 2007 Schools, United States Department of Education. Accessed October 15, 2007.
  18. ^ 2009 Blue Ribbon Schools: All Public and Private Schools, United States Department of Education. Accessed October 29, 2009.
  19. ^ New Jersey Department of Education Best Practices Award recipient for 2005-06, accessed October 23, 2006
  20. ^ Jacobs, Andrew. "Criticized Poet Is Named Laureate of Newark Schools", The New York Times, December 19, 2002. Accessed September 19, 2008. "A longtime Newark resident who was pivotal in the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s, Mr. Baraka has ignored calls from Gov. James E. McGreevey and others that he resign the post, which pays a stipend of $10,000."
  21. ^ Essex County School Directory, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed November 5, 2009.
  22. ^ Home page, Newark Public Schools. Accessed August 4, 2008.
  23. ^ Central Office Directory, Newark Public Schools. Accessed August 4, 2008.
  24. ^ "Facts for Parents about School Uniforms." Newark Public Schools. Retrieved on March 2, 2010.
  25. ^ "Dear Parents of High School Students:" Newark Public Schools. June 22, 2009. Retrieved on March 2, 2010.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°44′16″N 74°10′16″W / 40.737868°N 74.171044°W / 40.737868; -74.171044