Newberry College

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Newberry College
Newberry College Historic District.jpg
Smeltzer Hall on the campus of Newberry College
Established 1856
Type Private
Endowment $23 million (2012)[1]
President Maurice Scherrens
Students 1,042
Location Newberry, South Carolina, United States
Campus 90 acres (36 ha)
Nickname Wolves
Website www.newberry.edu

Newberry College is a co-educational, private liberal-arts college of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) located on a historic 90-acre (36 ha) campus in Newberry, South Carolina. The college has 1,042 students and a 14:1 student-teacher ratio. According to U.S. News & World Report's America's Best Colleges, Newberry College ranks among the nation’s top colleges in the southern region.

It is experiencing financial issues and has been placed on probation by its regional accreditor the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.[2][3]

History[edit]

In 2006-2007, Newberry College celebrated its 150th anniversary of service and educational leadership to the Newberry community, South Carolina, and to the Lutheran Church.

Newberry's heritage began in 1828 at the annual meeting of the Lutheran Synod in South Carolina and Adjacent States—nearly 30 years before it was chartered as a college by the State of South Carolina. At that 1828 meeting the Rev. John Bachman, President of the Synod, recommended the establishment of a seminary to train Lutheran ministers. The following year the Synod followed his advice and voted to establish a seminary and classical academy.

The new seminary-academy opened its doors in February 1831, near Pomaria, South Carolina (about 15 miles (24 km) from the College's present location); it moved to neighboring Lexington, South Carolina in 1834 and remained there for more than 20 years.

In 1854 the Synod voted to make the institution a degree-granting college, in 1855 to move it to Newberry, and in 1856—just before the granting of the charter—to name it Newberry College. A preparatory department opened in 1858, and the College and Seminary began operation in February 1859.

It prospered until the Civil War when nearly all faculty and students were called into military service. At the end of the war, the only college building was occupied by federal troops. In 1868, as a result of the physical condition of the building, the military occupation, and the depletion of the endowment funds, the College faced a severe financial crisis. St. John's Lutheran church in Walhalla, South Carolina, in the extreme northwestern corner of the state, offered the College a new home and the offer was accepted. In 1877 through the efforts of Newberry residents, the College returned to its original site in Newberry, where it has prospered since.

During World War II, Newberry was one of 131 colleges and universities nationally that took part in the V-12 Navy College Training Program which offered students a path to a Navy commission.[4]

The College has maintained its association with the Lutheran Church. Today Newberry is affiliated with the South Carolina, Southeastern, Florida-Bahamas, and Caribbean Synods of the ELCA.

In the spring of 2009, the college launched its Newberry FastForward program, which is an adult degree completion program. The program includes a course format with few visits to campus, an accelerated schedule, and a reduced tuition structure for older returning students seeking a bachelor's degree.

The Newberry College Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.[5]

V-12: The Navy College Training Program[edit]

In 1943, Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox announced the start of a new college training program, the V-12 Navy College Training Program. The program was designed to supplement the force of commissioned officers in the United States Navy during World War II. Newberry College became one of 131 colleges and universities in the United States chosen to participate in the V-12 program.

On July 1, 1943, the first 325 cadets arrived on campus. These cadets consisted of both V-12 Cadets and V-5 Aviation Cadets.

The cadets attended classes for periods of one to six terms of 16 weeks. Work was planned so that each term was the equivalent of a normal college semester. The Navy handled the discipline of its cadets, directed the physical fitness program, provided military drills and cooperated with the College in the direction of the program.

During the 27 months the V-12 Program were a part of the College, over 1,000 Cadets were assigned to Newberry. On October 31, 1945, the V-12 Unit was decommissioned and Newberry College returned to its civilian status.

Accreditation[edit]

Newberry College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) to award Bachelor’s Degrees. However, following six months in an "on warning" status SACS placed the institution on probation in June 2014 because the institution is experiencing financial issues.[6][2][7]

Newberry College also holds current accreditation from these accrediting bodies:

Other NCATE-related accrediting bodies by which Newberry College is accredited include:

Accreditation compliance reports and letters of notification of accreditation status are on file in the Office of Institutional Effectiveness.

Newberry College is also a member of the Council of Independent Colleges; the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education; the Lutheran Educational Conference of North America; the South Carolina Association of Colleges and Universities; the South Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities; and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (Division II).

Athletics[edit]

List of Men's Athletic Teams:

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Soccer
  • Tennis
  • Wrestling

List of Women's Athletic Teams:

  • Basketball
  • Cross Country
  • Field Hockey
  • Golf
  • Lacrosse
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball

Newberry College has a diverse line-up in men's and women's sports including baseball, basketball, cheerleading, cross country, football, golf, soccer, softball, tennis, volleyball, and wrestling. The College is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (Division II) and the South Atlantic Conference (SAC). The school is famous for being on the losing end of a tilt against Furman University, in which Frank Selvy scored 100 points.

Newberry's football team won their first South Atlantic Conference Championship in the 2006 season. The team finished with a 10-1 record in the regular season, losing only in their last game ever against their rival, Presbyterian College. The team also won a first round game in their first ever post season appearance in Division II football.

In August 2005, Newberry College was placed on a watch list by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), along with 17 other schools, which deemed the use of "Indians" as hostile and abusive, and prohibited the use of Native American nicknames, mascots and imagery in postseason competition. In September 2005, Newberry College appealed to be removed from the list of schools which were declared unable to host postseason play on the basis that none of the institution's uses of "Indians" were hostile and/or abusive toward Native Americans. The next month, the NCAA rejected Newberry's appeal. On May 7, 2008 Newberry's Athletic Department officially retired the nickname "Indians" from all of the school's 15 NCAA athletic teams. The college used their "Block N" logo for Newberry College's athletic teams until June 7, 2010 when Newberry's Athletic Director, Brad Edwards, announced that the school had decided on a new nickname for its athletic teams. Effective from that day, Newberry College athletic teams (men's and women's) would be known as "Wolves."[8]

Music Program[edit]

The music program at Newberry College has a history in vocal and instrumental performance dating back over 100 years, and a jazz band and marching band in existence since 1956. It was in 1956 that a major turning point in the school’s musical history took place. It was then that respected military band leader and alumnus Charles “Chief” Pruitt organized the jazz band and the marching band after returning to the school to teach music.[9]

The Newberry College marching band, which has been in existence since that time, is one of the most unique aspects of Newberry College’s music program. Newberry is one of the smallest colleges in the country with a marching band, and it is the only Lutheran school in the country with a marching band.

Also in 1956, Pruitt also hosted the first jazz festival at Newberry College. This jazz festival has since become a unique annual tradition at Newberry College, and is considered to be the second oldest jazz festival in the nation.

Notable Alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Newberry College (profile)". US News and World Report. Retrieved July 20, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "Southern Accreditor Clears Virginia, Fisk, Florida A&M". Inside Higher Ed. December 11, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2013. 
  3. ^ Doug Lederman (June 20, 2014). "A College Loses Accreditation". Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved July 29, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Dr. Edward W. Burke, Former Professor Passes". King College. 2010. Retrieved September 29, 2011. 
  5. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 
  6. ^ Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (December 13, 2013). "Disclosure Statement Regarding the Status of NEWBERRY COLLEGE". Retrieved March 20, 2014. 
  7. ^ Doug Lederman (June 20, 2014). "A College Loses Accreditation". Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved July 29, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Newberry College adopts "Wolves" as official nickname". Newberry College. June 7, 2010. Retrieved June 7, 2010. 
  9. ^ "Pruitt Obituary". Retrieved 24 April 2013. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 34°17′06″N 81°37′15″W / 34.2851°N 81.6207°W / 34.2851; -81.6207