Newcastle-upon-Tyne (UK Parliament constituency)

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Newcastle-upon-Tyne
Former Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
County Northumberland
Major settlements Newcastle upon Tyne
1295–1918
Number of members Two
Replaced by Newcastle-upon-Tyne Central, Newcastle-upon-Tyne East, Newcastle-upon-Tyne North and Newcastle-upon-Tyne West

Newcastle-upon-Tyne was a borough constituency in the county of Northumberland of the House of Commons of England to 1706 then of the House of Commons of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the House of Commons of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1918. It returned two Members of Parliament (MPs), elected by the bloc vote system.

The constituency was abolished in 1918, being split into four divisions; Newcastle-upon-Tyne Central, Newcastle-upon-Tyne East, Newcastle-upon-Tyne North and Newcastle-upon-Tyne West.

Boundaries[edit]

The constituency was based upon the town, later city, of Newcastle-upon-Tyne; in the historic county of Northumberland in North East England. In 1848, the constituency boundaries were described in A Topographical Dictionary of England [1]

The borough first exercised the elective franchise in the 23rd of Edward the First, since which time it has returned two members to parliament: the present electoral limits are co-extensive with those of the county of the town, comprising 5730 acres; the old boundaries, which were abrogated in 1832, included 2700 acres only.

When the House of Commons debated the boundaries to be used from 1832, the Tory Party suggested including Gateshead (to the south) and South Shields (to the east) within the Newcastle-upon-Tyne constituency. The Whigs resisted this idea, so these two neighbouring settlements were not incorporated into this seat.[2]

The boundaries of the parliamentary borough, as defined by the Parliamentary Boundaries Act 1832 (2 and 3 Wm. 4, c. 64), remained unchanged from 1832 until the area was divided into single member constituencies in 1918.[3] These were not necessarily identical to the boundaries used for local government purposes.

In the period after 1885, the constituency was surrounded by Wansbeck to the west and north, Tyneside to the north ease and east, Jarrow to the south east, Gateshead to the south, and Chester-le-Street to the south west.[4]

Members of Parliament[edit]

Party affiliations are derived from Stook Smith and Craig (see reference section below). Tory is used prior to the 1835 general election and Conservative from that time. Liberal candidates (as listed by Craig) before the formal creation of the party, shortly after the 1859 general election, are listed as Whig or Radical if the information is available in the work by Stooks Smith.

MPs, who were known by the same name, are distinguished in the table below and the election results by a number in brackets after the name. It is not suggested that such numbers were used by contemporaries of the individuals so numbered.

MPs 1386–1660[edit]

Parliament First member Second member
1378 William Bishopdale [5]
1381 William Bishopdale [5]
1386 John Howell Laurence Acton [5]
1388 (February) William Bishopdale Sampson Hardyng [5]
1388 (September) Henry Carlisle Stephen Whitgray [5]
1390 (January) William Bishopdale Stephen Whitgray [5]
1390 (November)
1391 William Bishopdale Laurence Acton [5]
1393 John Morton Richard/William Langton [5]
1394 Henry Carlisle Thomas Diringdon [5]
1395 John Morton William Langton [5]
1397 (January) William Redmarshall Sampson Hardyng [5]
1397 (September) William Redmarshall Laurence Acton [5]
1399 Roger Thornton Laurence Acton [5]
1401
1402 Robert Darcy Richard Beverley [5]
1404 (January)
1404 (October)
1406 John Paulyn Robert Hebburn [5]
1407 William Johnson William Langton [5]
1410
1411 Roger Thornton Roger Booth [5]
1413 (February)
1413 (May) Richard Dalton Robert Whelpington [5]
1414 (April) William Middleton Robert Swinburne [5]
1414 (November) William Johnson Robert Whelpington [5]
1415 Roger Booth Robert Whelpington [5]
1416 (March) Roger Booth Thomas Hebburn [5]
1416 (October)
1417 Roger Thornton John Strother [5]
1419 Roger Thornton John Strother [5]
1420 Roger Booth John Wall [5]
1421 (May) Emericus Hering John Strother [5]
1421 (December) Roger Booth William Ellerby [5]
1510-1523 No names known [6]
1529 Sir Thomas Tempest Henry Anderson [6]
1536  ?Sir Thomas Tempest  ? [6]
1539  ?
1542  ?
1545 Sir Robert Bowes Robert Brandling [6]
1547 Sir Francis Leke Sir Robert Brandling [6]
1553 (March) Robert Lewen Bertram Anderson [6]
1553 (October) Sir Robert Brandling Edward Hall [6]
1554 (April) Bertram Anderson Cuthbert Horsley [6]
1554 (November) Bertram Anderson John Watson [6]
1555 Sir Robert Brandling Cuthbert Blount [6]
1558 Bertram Anderson Robert Lewen [6]
1559 (January) Robert Lewen Cuthbert Blount [7]
1562 (December) Sir Robert Brandling Bertram Anderson [7]
1571 William Carr William Jenison I [7]
1572 (April) William Jenison I William Selby [7]
1584 William Jenison I Henry Anderson [7]
1586 Henry Anderson Edward Lewen [7]
1588 (October) Henry Anderson Henry Mitford [7]
1593 Henry Anderson Henry Mitford [7]
1597 (October) Henry Chapman Henry Lindley [7]
1601 (October) William Jenison II George Selby [7]
1604 George Selby Henry Chapman
1614 Henry Anderson William Jenison II
1621 Henry Anderson Sir Thomas Ridell
1624 Sir Peter Riddel Sir Henry Anderson
1625 Sir Thomas Ridell Sir Henry Anderson
1626 Sir Peter Riddel Sir Henry Anderson
1628 Sir Peter Riddel Sir Thomas Ridell
1629–1640 No Parliaments convened
1640 (April) Sir Peter Riddel Thomas Liddel
1640 (November) Sir Henry Anderson, disabled 1643 John Blakiston
1645 Sir Henry Anderson John Blakiston,
replaced 1647 by
Robert Ellison)
1648 Robert Ellison) John Blakiston, died 1649
1654 Sir Arthur Hesilrige (One seat only)
1656 Walter Strickland (One seat only)
1659 Mark Shaftoe (of Newcastle) Thomas Lilburne

MPs 1660–1918[edit]

Election 1st Member 1st Party 2nd Member 2nd Party
1660 Robert Ellison Sir Francis Anderson
1661 Sir John Marlay
1673 Sir William Blackett, Bt (1)
1679 Sir Ralph Carr
1680 Sir Nathaniel Johnson
1685 Sir William Blackett, Bt (2)
1689 Sir Ralph Carr
1690 William Carr (1)
1695 Sir William Blackett, Bt (2)
1700 Sir Henry Liddell, Bt
1705 Sir William Blackett, Bt (2)
1706 Sir Henry Liddell, Bt
1710 Sir William Blackett, Bt (3)
died 1728; declared not duly elected
in 1727, in 1729
William Wrightson
1722 William Carr (2)
1727 [8] Nicholas Fenwick
1729 on petition William Carr (2)
1734 Sir Walter Calverley Blackett, Bt
1747 Matthew Ridley
1774 Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bt (1)
1777 Sir John Trevelyan, Bt
1780 Andrew Robinson Stoney-Bowes
1784 Charles Brandling Tory Whig
1798 by-election Charles John Brandling Tory
1812 Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bt (2) Whig Cuthbert Ellison Whig
1830 John Hodgson Tory
1835 William Ord Whig
1836 by-election John Hodgson Hinde
John Hodgson until August 1836
Conservative
1847 Thomas Emerson Headlam Whig
1852 John Fenwick Burgoyne Blackett Liberal
1856 by-election George Ridley Liberal
1859 change Liberal
1860 Somerset Archibald Beaumont Liberal
1865 Sir Joseph Cowen (1) Liberal
1874 by-election Joseph Cowen (2) Liberal
1874 Charles Frederic Hamond Conservative
1880 Ashton Wentworth Dilke Liberal
1883 by-election John Morley Liberal
1885 Independent Liberal
1886 James Craig Liberal
1892 Sir Charles Frederic Hamond Conservative
1895 William Donaldson Cruddas Conservative
1900 Sir Walter Richard Plummer Conservative George Renwick Conservative
1906 Walter Hudson Labour Thomas Cairns Liberal
1908 by-election George Renwick Conservative
1910 (January) Edward Shortt Liberal
1918 Constituency abolished

Elections[edit]

The bloc vote electoral system was used in elections to fill two seats and first past the post for single member by-elections. Each voter had up to as many votes as there were seats to be filled. Votes had to be cast by a spoken declaration, in public, at the hustings (until the secret ballot was introduced in 1872).

Note on percentage change calculations: Where there was only one candidate of a party in successive elections, for the same number of seats, change is calculated on the party percentage vote. Where there was more than one candidate, in one or both successive elections for the same number of seats, then change is calculated on the individual percentage vote (if applicable).

The reference to some candidates as Non Partisan does not, necessarily, mean that they did not have a party allegiance. It means that the sources consulted did not specify a party allegiance.

Before the Representation of the People Act 1832, the borough had an electorate limited to its freemen. There were about 2,500 voters in the second half of the 18th century.[9]

1710s1720s1730s1740s1750s1760s1770s1780s1790s1800s1810s1820s1830s

Elections of the 1710s[edit]

General Election 1710: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Sir William Blackett, Bt (3) 1,177 44.0 N/A
Non Partisan William Wrightson 886 33.2 N/A
Non Partisan William Carr (2) 609 22.8 N/A
Turnout 2,672 N/A N/A
General Election 1715: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Sir William Blackett, Bt (3) 639 44.0 ...
Non Partisan William Wrightson 550 37.9 +4.7
Non Partisan James Clavering[disambiguation needed] 263 18.1 N/A
Turnout 1,452 N/A N/A

Elections of the 1720s[edit]

General Election 1722: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan William Carr (2) 1,264 38.3 N/A
Non Partisan Sir William Blackett, Bt (3) 1,158 35.9 -8.1
Non Partisan William Wrightson 831 25.8 -12.1
Turnout 3,223 N/A N/A
General Election 1727: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Sir William Blackett, Bt (3) 1,202 39.9 +4.0
Non Partisan Nicholas Fenwick 1,189 39.5 N/A
Non Partisan William Carr (2) 620 20.6 -17.7
Turnout 3,011 N/A N/A
  • Death of Blackett, in 1728
  • On petition Carr vice Blackett

Elections of the 1730s[edit]

General Election 1734: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Walter Calverley Blackett 1,354 42.9 N/A
Non Partisan Nicholas Fenwick 1,083 34.3 -5.2
Non Partisan William Carr (2) 716 22.7 -2.1
Turnout 3,153 (1,795 electors) N/A N/A

Elections of the 1740s[edit]

General Election 1741: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Walter Calverley Blackett 1,453 32.3 -10.6
Non Partisan Nicholas Fenwick 1,231 27.4 -6.9
Non Partisan Matthew Ridley 1,131 25.1 N/A
Non Partisan William Carr (2) 683 15.2 -7.5
Turnout 4,498 (2,391 electors) N/A N/A
General Election 1747: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Walter Calverley Blackett Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan Matthew Ridley Unopposed N/A N/A

Elections of the 1750s[edit]

General Election 17 April 1754: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Sir Walter Calverley Blackett, Bt Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan Matthew Ridley Unopposed N/A N/A

Elections of the 1760s[edit]

General Election 27 March 1761: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Sir Walter Calverley Blackett, Bt Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan Matthew Ridley Unopposed N/A N/A
General Election 21 March 1768: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Sir Walter Calverley Blackett, Bt Unopposed N/A N/A
Non Partisan Matthew Ridley Unopposed N/A N/A

Elections of the 1770s[edit]

General Election 11 October 1774: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Sir Walter Calverley Blackett, Bt 1,432 33.2 N/A
Non Partisan Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bt (1) 1,411 32.7 N/A
Non Partisan Constantine John Phipps 795 18.4 N/A
Non Partisan Thomas Delaval 677 15.7 N/A
Turnout 4,315 (2,162 electors) N/A N/A
  • Death of Blackett
By-Election 27 February 1777: Newcastle-upon-Tyne
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Sir John Trevelyan, Bt 1,163 52.1 N/A
Non Partisan Andrew Robinson Stoney-Bowes 1,068 47.9 N/A
Majority 95 4.3 N/A
Turnout 2,231 N/A N/A
Non Partisan hold Swing N/A

Elections of the 1780s[edit]

General Election 11 September 1780: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Non Partisan Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bt (1) 1,408 38.8 +6.1
Non Partisan Andrew Robinson Stoney-Bowes 1,135 31.3 N/A
Non Partisan Thomas Delaval 1,085 29.9 +14.2
Turnout 3,628 (2,245 electors) N/A N/A
General Election 26 April 1784: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bt (1) Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory Charles Brandling Unopposed N/A N/A

Elections of the 1790s[edit]

General Election 1790: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bt (1) Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory Charles Brandling Unopposed N/A N/A
General Election 1796: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bt (1) Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory Charles Brandling Unopposed N/A N/A
  • Resignation of Brandling in December 1797
By-Election 1798: Newcastle-upon-Tyne
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Tory Charles John Brandling Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory hold Swing N/A

Elections of the 1800s[edit]

General Election 1802: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bt (1) Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory Charles John Brandling Unopposed N/A N/A
General Election 1806: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bt (1) Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory Charles John Brandling Unopposed N/A N/A
General Election 1807: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bt (1) Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory Charles John Brandling Unopposed N/A N/A

Elections of the 1810s[edit]

General Election 1812: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Matthew White Ridley (2) Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig Cuthbert Ellison Unopposed N/A N/A
  • Ridley succeeded as the 3rd Baronet, upon the death of his father (and predecessor as MP) in 1813
General Election 1818: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bt (2) Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig Cuthbert Ellison Unopposed N/A N/A
General Election 1818: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bt (2) Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig Cuthbert Ellison Unopposed N/A N/A

Elections of the 1820s[edit]

General Election 1820: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bt (2) 616 47.0 N/A
Whig Cuthbert Ellison 477 36.4 N/A
Tory Hon. W.H. John Scott 217 16.6 N/A
Turnout 1,310 (731 electors) N/A N/A
General Election 1826: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bt (2) Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig Cuthbert Ellison Unopposed N/A N/A

Elections of the 1830s[edit]

General Election 1830: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bt (2) Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory John Hodgson Unopposed N/A N/A
General Election 1831: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bt (2) Unopposed N/A N/A
Tory John Hodgson Unopposed N/A N/A
General Election 1832: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bt (2) 2,112 43.2 N/A
Tory John Hodgson 1,686 34.5 N/A
Radical Charles Attwood 1,092 22.3 N/A
Turnout 4,890 (2,850 electors) 73.0 N/A
Registered electors 3,905
General Election 1835: Newcastle-upon-Tyne (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig William Ord 1,843 33.0 N/A
Whig Sir Matthew White Ridley, Bt (2) 1,499 26.8 -16.4
Conservative John Hodgson 1,254 22.5 -12.0
Radical James Aytoun 988 17.7 -4.6
Turnout 5,584 (3,107 electors) 76.6 +3.6
Registered electors 4,054

Elections of the 1900s[edit]

General Election January 1906[10]

Electorate 36,909

Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Labour Green tickY Walter Hudson 18,869 31.1
Liberal Green tickY Thomas Cairns 18,423 30.5
Conservative Sir Walter Richard Plummer 11,942 19.8
Conservative George Renwick 11,223 18.6
Turnout 84.6
Majority 6,927 11.3
Labour gain from Conservative Swing
Majority 6,481 10.7
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing
Newcastle-upon-Tyne by-election, 1908[11]

Electorate 37,389

Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative George Renwick 13,863 48.5
Liberal Edward Shortt 11,720 41.1
Social Democratic Federation Edward Robertshaw Hartley 2,971 10.4
Turnout 76.4
Majority 2,143
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing

Elections of the 1910s[edit]

Edward Shortt
General Election January 1910[12]

Electorate 38,534

Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Green tickY Edward Shortt 18,779
Labour Green tickY Walter Hudson 18,241
Conservative Sir Walter Richard Plummer 14,067
Conservative George Renwick 13,928
Turnout
Majority 4,174
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing
Majority
Labour hold Swing

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ 'Newbottle - Newcastle-upon-Tyne', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 379-389. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51171 Date accessed: 15 December 2008.
  2. ^ Seymour Electoral Reform in England and Wales
  3. ^ Craig Boundaries of Parliamentary Constituencies 1885-1972
  4. ^ Map in Craig Boundaries of Parliamentary Constituencies 1885-1972
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa "BISHOPDALE, William (d.1398), of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumb.". History of Parliament. Retrieved 2 May 2014. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "History of Parliament". Retrieved 2011-10-05. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "History of Parliament". Retrieved 2011-10-05. 
  8. ^ The 1727 election was disputed. As a result of an election petition, the House of Commons decided to seat Carr vice Blackett (who had died in 1728) in 1729.
  9. ^ Namier and Brooke The House of Commons 1754-1790
  10. ^ British parliamentary election results 1885-1918
  11. ^ British parliamentary election results 1885-1918
  12. ^ British parliamentary election results 1885-1918

References[edit]

  • Boundaries of Parliamentary Constituencies 1885-1972, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (Parliamentary Reference Publications 1972)
  • British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (Macmillan Press 1977)
  • British Parliamentary Election Results 1885-1918, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (Macmillan Press 1974)
  • Electoral Reform in England and Wales, by Charles Seymour (David & Charles Reprints 1970)
  • The House of Commons 1754-1790, by Sir Lewis Namier and John Brooke (HMSO 1964)
  • The Parliaments of England by Henry Stooks Smith (1st edition published in three volumes 1844-50), second edition edited (in one volume) by F.W.S. Craig (Political Reference Publications 1973)
  • Who's Who of British Members of Parliament: Volume I 1832-1885, edited by M. Stenton (The Harvester Press 1976)
  • Who's Who of British Members of Parliament, Volume II 1886-1918, edited by M. Stenton and S. Lees (Harvester Press 1978)