Newcome's School

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Engraving c.1820 of the former Newcome's School in Hackney

Newcome's School was a fashionable school in Hackney, then to the east of London, founded in the early 18th century. A number of prominent Whig families sent their children there. The school closed in 1815, and the buildings were gutted in 1820. In 1825 the London Orphan Asylum opened on the site. Today the Clapton Girls' Academy is located here.

History[edit]

Newcome's school was established in the early 18th century. During the 18th century and early 19th century, Hackney was home to private schools of all kinds, and was considered a healthy area, close to London.

A number of prominent Whig families sent their children to the school. Dr. Henry Newcome who gave the school its name was noted for Whig political principles, and a large number of future Members of Parliament were educated at Newcome's, which was in the Newcome family for three generations, to 1803.[1][2] Distinguished pupils included Augustus FitzRoy, 3rd Duke of Grafton, British Prime Minister from 1768-1770, and two Founding Fathers of the United States (Middleton and Nelson). The family descended from Henry Newcome, a prominent nonconformist minister in Manchester. His third son Peter was an Anglican priest, and the father of the Henry Newcome who gave the school its name.

The school closed in 1815, and the building was knocked down in 1820.[3] In 1825 the London Orphan Asylum opened on the site.[4] The History of Parliament (1820–1832) comments that, even after its closure, the school could count nine Members of Parliament educated there in the period.[5] It sent 42 pupils to Trinity College, Cambridge.[6]

Today the Clapton Girls' Academy is located on the site.

Drama[edit]

Newcome's School was noted for a series of dramatic productions.[7] In some case a prologue or epilogue was written specially. The school was one of a group that acted as preparatory schools to Westminster School; the dramatic tradition imitated Westminster's, with the difference that plays were in English (rather than Latin). One of the contributors of prologues was David Garrick.[8] The custom of giving a play every three years was also taken over from the Elizabethan statutes of Westminster School. It ended about 1800.[9]

Other plays known to have been given by the performance of Andria were Shakespeare's King John and Macbeth.[18]

Staff[edit]

James Greenwood was usher at the school under Benjamin Morland, then leaving to set up his own academy.[19] George Budd taught art there.[20] William Coleridge, elder brother of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, taught at the school in the 1780s.[21]

Head Masters[edit]

Pupils[edit]

American pupils[edit]

References[edit]

  • Nicholas Hans (1998). New Trends in Education in the 18th Century. Routledge. ISBN 0-415-17611-5. 

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Sir Lewis Bernstein Namier; John Brooke (1985). The House of Commons 1754-1790. Boydell & Brewer. p. 2. ISBN 978-0-436-30420-0. Retrieved 13 May 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Daniel Lysons (1811). The Environs of London: Kent, Essex, and Herts. Printed for T. Cadell and W. Davies. pp. 310–11. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  3. ^ www.clapton.hackney.sch.uk, Portico History.
  4. ^ T. F. T. Baker (Editor) (1995). "Hackney: Clapton". A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 10: Hackney. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 13 May 2013. 
  5. ^ historyofparliamentonline.org, VI. The Members (1820–1832).
  6. ^ a b c d e Edward Alfred Jones, Newcome's Academy and its Plays, p. 345
  7. ^ a b  Lee, Sidney, ed. (1897). "Skeffington, Lumley St. George". Dictionary of National Biography 52. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 
  8. ^ John Sargeaunt, Annals of Westminster School (1898), p. 185; archive.org.
  9. ^ T. H. Vail Motter, Garrick and the Private Theatres: With a List of Amateur Performances in the Eighteenth Century, ELH Vol. 11, No. 1 (Mar., 1944), pp. 63-75, at p. 70. Published by: The Johns Hopkins University Press. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2871745
  10. ^ Rae Blanchard, A Prologue and an Epilogue for Nicholas Rowe's Tamerlane by Richard Steele, PMLA Vol. 47, No. 3 (Sep., 1932), pp. 772-776, at p. 772. Published by: Modern Language Association. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/457953
  11. ^ a b Edmund Burke (1777). Dodsley's Annual Register. J. Dodsley. p. 39. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  12. ^ Vicesimus Knox (1842). Elegant Extracts: Or, Useful and Entertaining Passages, from the Best English Authors and Translations. Benjamin B. Mussey. p. 340. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  13. ^ T. H. Vail Motter, Garrick and the Private Theatres: With a List of Amateur Performances in the Eighteenth Century, ELH Vol. 11, No. 1 (Mar., 1944), pp. 63-75, at p. 65. Published by: The Johns Hopkins University Press. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2871745
  14. ^ H. Dlack Johnstone, New Light on John Hoadly and His "Poems Set to Music by Dr. Greene", Studies in Bibliography Vol. 56, (2003/2004), pp. 281-293, at p. 291. Published by: Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40372199
  15. ^ James Plumptre (1812). Lionel and Clarissa, by I. Bickerstaff. The toy shop; the king and the miller of Mansfield; Sir John Cockle at court; the blind beggar of Bethnal Green, by R. Dodsley. Barataria, by F. Pilon. Rosina, by Mrs. Brooke. F. Hodson. pp. 223–4. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  16. ^ Eric Robinson, John Clare (1793-1864) and James Plumptre (1771-1832), "A Methodistical Parson", Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society Vol. 11, No. 1 (1996), pp. 59-88, at p. 70. Published by: Cambridge Bibliographical Society. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41154856
  17. ^ W. D. King, "Shadow of a Mesmeriser": The Female Body on the "Dark" Stage, Theatre Journal Vol. 49, No. 2 (May, 1997), pp. 189-206, note p. 195. Published by: The Johns Hopkins University Press. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3208681
  18. ^ T. H. Vail Motter, Garrick and the Private Theatres: With a List of Amateur Performances in the Eighteenth Century, ELH Vol. 11, No. 1 (Mar., 1944), pp. 63-75, at p. 73. Published by: The Johns Hopkins University Press. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2871745
  19. ^  Stephen, Leslie; Lee, Sidney, eds. (1890). "Greenwood, James". Dictionary of National Biography 23. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 
  20. ^ Haut, Asia. "Budd, George". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/3877.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  21. ^ Samuel Taylor Coleridge (2001). Poetical Works. Princeton University Press. p. lxiii. ISBN 978-0-691-00483-9. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  22. ^ "Morland, Benjamin (MRLT676B)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  23. ^ John Britton; Edward Wedlake Brayley; James Norris Brewer (1814). The Beauties of England and Wales, or, Delineations, topographical, historical, and descriptive, of each county. Printed by Thomas Maiden, for Vernor and Hood [and 6 others]. p. 331. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  24. ^ Thomas Hayter (bp. of London.) (1754). A sermon [on Ps. cxxii, 8, 9] preach'd before the Society corresponding with the Incorporated society in Dublin, for promoting English protestant working-schools in Ireland, May 2d, 1753. p. 49. Retrieved 14 May 2013. 
  25. ^ "Newcome, Henry (NWCM706H)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  26. ^ a b c d The Publications of the Harleian Society vol. 29 (1895), pp. 1044–5; archive.org.
  27. ^ "Heathcote, Charles Thomas (HTCT784CT)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  28. ^ Edward Wedlake Brayley; James Norris Brewer; Joseph Nightingale (1816). London and Middlesex: or, An historical, commercial, & descriptive survey of the metropolis of Great-Britain: including sketches of its environs, and a topographical account of the most remarkable places in the above county. Printed by W. Wilson, for Vernor, Hood, and Sharpe. p. 270. Retrieved 13 May 2013. 
  29. ^ a b Oliver Bradbury and Nicholas Penny, The Picture Collecting of Lord Northwick: Part I, The Burlington Magazine Vol. 144, No. 1193 (Aug., 2002), pp. 485-496, at p. 486. Published by: The Burlington Magazine Publications Ltd. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/889635
  30. ^ historyofparliamentonline.org, Brandling, Charles John (1769-1826), of Gosforth House, Northumb.
  31. ^ Carter, Philip. "Burgoyne, Montagu". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/4015.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  32. ^ historyofparliamentonline.org, Canning, Stratford (1786-1880).
  33. ^ a b c d e f Hans, p. 76.
  34. ^ Appleby, John H. "Chiswell, Richard Muilman Trench". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/5332.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  35. ^ Stearn, Roger T. "Congreve, William". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/6070.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  36. ^ Thomas, William. "Creevey, Thomas". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/37320.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  37. ^  Stephen, Leslie, ed. (1888). "Dade, William". Dictionary of National Biography 13. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 
  38. ^ a b c d e Hans, p. 243.
  39. ^ historyofparliamentonline.org, Fetherston, alias Fetherston Haugh, Sir George Ralph, 3rd Bt. (1784-1853), of Ardagh, co. Longford.
  40. ^ historyofparliamentonline.org, Heathcote, Sir Gilbert, 4th bt. (1773-1851), of Normanton Park, Rutland and Durdans, nr. Epsom, Surr.
  41. ^ O'Brien, Gerard. "Hervey, Frederick". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/13111.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  42. ^ Loudon, Jean. "Hoadly, Benjamin". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/13374.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  43. ^ Aston, Nigel. "Hoadly, John". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/13377.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  44. ^  Lee, Sidney, ed. (1891). "Hunter, Claudius Stephen". Dictionary of National Biography 28. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 
  45. ^ Hortense S. Miller, The Herbarium of Aylmer Bourke Lambert: Notes on Its Acquisition, Dispersal, and Present Whereabouts, Taxon Vol. 19, No. 4 (Aug., 1970), pp. 489-553, at p. 493. Published by: International Association for Plant Taxonomy (IAPT). Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/1218947
  46. ^ Molineux, Crisp (1730-92), of Garboldisham, Norf.
  47. ^ "Leycester, Ralph (LCSR717R)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  48. ^  Stephen, Leslie, ed. (1888). "Newcome, Peter". Dictionary of National Biography 13. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 
  49. ^ Nockles, Peter B. "Norris, Henry Handley". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/20274.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  50. ^ historyofparliamentonline.org, Owen, Hugh (?1731-86), of Orielton, Pemb.
  51. ^ historyofparliamentonline.org, Pardoe, John (?1756-96), of Low Layton, Essex and 14 Bedford Row, Mdx.
  52. ^ Lindsay, Jean. "Pennant, Richard". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/21859.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  53. ^ historyofparliamentonline.org, Petit, Louis Hayes (1774-1849), of 9 New Square, Lincoln's Inn, Mdx..
  54. ^ Shaffer, Elinor. "Plumptre, James". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/22404.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  55. ^ Chandler, David. "Plumptre, Robert". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/22406.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  56. ^ historyofparliamentonline.org, Sloane, Hans (1739-1827), of South Stoneham, Hants.
  57. ^ St. Quintin, Matthew Chitty (?1701-83), of Harpham, Yorks.
  58. ^ St. Quintin, William (?1699-1770), of Harpham, Yorks.
  59. ^ Rae Blanchard, A Prologue and an Epilogue for Nicholas Rowe's Tamerlane by Richard Steele, PMLA Vol. 47, No. 3 (Sep., 1932), pp. 772-776, at p. 773. Published by: Modern Language Association. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/457953
  60. ^ Davis, Michael T. "Vaughan, Benjamin". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/28123.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  61. ^  Lee, Sidney, ed. (1899). "Vaughan, William (1752-1850)". Dictionary of National Biography 58. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 
  62. ^ Matthew, H. C. G. "Western, Charles Callis". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/29110.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  63. ^  Lee, Sidney, ed. (1900). "Whinyates, Edward Charles". Dictionary of National Biography 61. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 
  64. ^ Cannon, John. "Yorke, Charles". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/30237.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  65. ^  Lee, Sidney, ed. (1900). "Yorke, Joseph (1724-1792)". Dictionary of National Biography 63. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 
  66. ^ Barczewski, Stephanie L. "Yorke, Philip". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/30246.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  67. ^ historyofparliamentonline.org, Yorke, Hon. John (1728-1801), of Sonning, Berks.
  68. ^ Notes and Queries, 12th series vol. 5, p. 141; archive.org.
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  70. ^ G. MacLaren Brydon, English Education of Thomas Nelson, Jr., of Yorktown, The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography Vol. 51, No. 4 (Oct., 1943), pp. 347-350. Published by: Virginia Historical Society. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4245255

Coordinates: 51°33′13″N 00°03′04″W / 51.55361°N 0.05111°W / 51.55361; -0.05111