Newfoundland ten cents

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The Newfoundland ten cent coins exist as a bronze pattern with the adopted obverse from the New Brunswick coin (the words Newfoundland substitute New Brunswick). This design adoption is similar to that used for Newfoundland five cent coins.

The obverse, featuring Queen Victoria, has three different varieties. The first variety is found on coins dated 1865, 1870, and 1873. There are two leaves at the top of the laurel crown. Another key way to distinguish this is the use of two dots before and after Newfoundland on the obverse.[1]

The second variety features three leaves at the top of the laurel crown and a dot can be found before but not after Newfoundland on the obverse. This variety is featured on coins dated 1870, 1872H, 1873, 1876H, 1880, 1885 and 1894.

The final variety is similar to the first variety with the two leaves at the top of the laurel crown. The difference is that the leaf barely touches the legend band of the obverse and is found on coins dated 1882H, 1885, 1888, 1890, 1894 and 1896.[2]

1871 Mint Mule[edit]

A rare variety exists because an 1871H Dominion of Canada reverse die was muled with an H Newfoundland obverse die.[3]

Mintages[edit]

Date and Mint Mark Mintage
1871H 40,000

Queen Victoria Laureated Portrait, 1865-1896[edit]

Specifcations[edit]

Designer Engraver Composition Weight Diameter
Leonard C. Wyon Leonard C. Wyon .925 silver, .075 copper 2.36 grams 17.98 mm

Mintages[edit]

Date and Mint Mark Mintage
1865 80,000
1870 30,000
1872 40,000 (part of 1871 mintage)
1873 20,000
1876H 10,000
1880 10,000
1882H 20,000
1885 8,000
1888 30,000
1890 100,000
1894 40,000
1896 230,000

Edward VII, 1903-1904[edit]

The obverse is that used for the Dominion of Canada coins. The reverse is a new design by George W. DeSaulles.[4]

Speciifcations[edit]

Designer Engraver Composition Weight Diameter
George W. DeSaulles George W. DeSaulles .925 silver, .075 copper 2.36 grams 17.96 mm

Mintages[edit]

Date and Mint Mark Mintage
1903 100,000
1904H 100,000

George V, 1912-1919[edit]

The obverse is the same as for the Dominion of Canada issues. The reverse is a continuation of the Newfoundland Edward VII designs.[5]

Speciifcations[edit]

Designer Engraver Composition Weight (1912–1917) Weight (1919) Diameter (1912) Diameter (1917–1919)
Sir E.B. MacKennal George W. DeSaulles .925 silver, .075 copper 2.36 grams 2.33 grams 17.96 mm 18.03 mm

Mintages[edit]

Date and Mint Mark Mintage
1912 150,000
1917C 250,805
1919C 54,342

George VI, 1938-1947[edit]

The obverse for this denomination used Percy Metcalfe’s standard portrait of George VI for British colonial coinages and the existing Edward VII/George V reverse. The mintage figures for 1946 and 1947 are considered unofficial. The same issue occurred with the Newfoundland five cents coins of the era. Published official mint reports do not indicate any mintage of the denomination during 1946, although there appears to be 1946 coins created in 1947.[6] Therefore, mintage figures for 1946 and 1947 are unofficial.

Specifications[edit]

Designer Engraver Composition (1938–1944) Composition (1945–1947) Weight Diameter
Percy Metcalfe George W. DeSaulles .925 silver, .075 copper .800 silver, .200 copper 2.36 grams 18.03 mm

Mintages[edit]

Date and Mint Mark Mintage
1938 100,000
1940 100,000
1941C 483,630
1942C 292,736
1943C 104,706
1944C 151,471
1945C 175,833
1946C 38,400
1947C 61,988

References[edit]

  1. ^ Charlton Standard Catalogue of Canadian Coins, p. 43, W.K. Cross, 60th Edition, 2006
  2. ^ Charlton Standard Catalogue of Canadian Coins, p. 43, W.K. Cross, 60th Edition, 2006
  3. ^ Charlton Standard Catalogue of Canadian Coins, p. 44, W.K. Cross, 60th Edition, 2006
  4. ^ Charlton Standard Catalogue of Canadian Coins, p. 45, W.K. Cross, 60th Edition, 2006
  5. ^ Charlton Standard Catalogue of Canadian Coins, p. 45, W.K. Cross, 60th Edition, 2006
  6. ^ Charlton Standard Catalogue of Canadian Coins, p. 41, W.K. Cross, 60th Edition, 2006