Newton, New Jersey

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Newton, New Jersey
Town
Town of Newton
Map of Newton in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Newton in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Newton, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Newton, New Jersey
Coordinates: 41°03′10″N 74°45′17″W / 41.052742°N 74.754787°W / 41.052742; -74.754787Coordinates: 41°03′10″N 74°45′17″W / 41.052742°N 74.754787°W / 41.052742; -74.754787[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Sussex
Incorporated April 11, 1864
Government[7]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Council-Manager)
 • Mayor Joseph A. Ricciardo (term ends June 30, 2014)[3][4]
 • Manager Thomas S. Russo, Jr.[5]
 • Clerk Lorraine A. Read[6]
Area[2]
 • Total 3.169 sq mi (8.207 km2)
 • Land 3.146 sq mi (8.147 km2)
 • Water 0.023 sq mi (0.060 km2)  0.73%
Area rank 327th of 566 in state
18th of 24 in county[2]
Elevation[8] 663 ft (202 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 7,997
 • Estimate (2012[12]) 7,856
 • Rank 288th of 566 in state
7th of 24 in county[13]
 • Density 2,542.2/sq mi (981.5/km2)
 • Density rank 245th of 566 in state
3rd of 24 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07860[14][15]
Area code(s) 973[16]
FIPS code 3403751930[17][2][18]
GNIS feature ID 0885322[19][2]
Website www.newtontownhall.com

Newton is a town in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States. It is the county seat of Sussex County.[20][21] As of the 2010 United States Census, the town's population was 7,997,[9][10][11] reflecting a decline of 247 (-3.0%) from the 8,244 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 723 (+9.6%) from the 7,521 counted in the 1990 Census.[22]

Newton was incorporated by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 11, 1864, from portions of Newton Township, which was also partitioned to create Andover Township and Hampton Township, and was then dissolved. Additional land was acquired from Andover Township in 1869 and 1927, and from Fredon Township in 1920.[23]

Geography[edit]

Newton is located at 41°03′10″N 74°45′17″W / 41.052742°N 74.754787°W / 41.052742; -74.754787 (41.052742,-74.754787). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town had a total area of 3.169 square miles (8.207 km2), of which, 3.146 square miles (8.147 km2) of it was land and 0.023 square miles (0.060 km2) of it (0.73%) was water.[1][2]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 2,403
1880 2,513 4.6%
1890 3,003 19.5%
1900 4,376 45.7%
1910 4,467 2.1%
1920 4,125 −7.7%
1930 5,401 30.9%
1940 5,533 2.4%
1950 5,781 4.5%
1960 6,563 13.5%
1970 7,297 11.2%
1980 7,748 6.2%
1990 7,521 −2.9%
2000 8,244 9.6%
2010 7,997 −3.0%
Est. 2012 7,856 [12] −1.8%
Population sources: 1870-1920[24]
1870[25][26] 1880-1890[27]
1890-1910[28] 1910-1930[29]
1930-1990[30] 2000[31][32] 2010[9][10][11]
Newton Green

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 7,997 people, 3,170 households, and 1,842 families residing in the town. The population density was 2,542.2 per square mile (981.5 /km2). There were 3,479 housing units at an average density of 1,106.0 per square mile (427.0 /km2). The racial makeup of the town was 85.04% (6,801) White, 4.88% (390) Black or African American, 0.49% (39) Native American, 2.98% (238) Asian, 0.05% (4) Pacific Islander, 4.34% (347) from other races, and 2.23% (178) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 12.34% (987) of the population.[9]

There were 3,170 households of which 27.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.1% were married couples living together, 13.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.9% were non-families. 36.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 3.06.[9]

In the town, 21.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 24.7% from 25 to 44, 26.8% from 45 to 64, and 18.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.9 years. For every 100 females there were 91.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.6 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $48,702 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,922) and the median family income was $72,266 (+/- $10,712). Males had a median income of $57,369 (+/- $5,859) versus $29,676 (+/- $3,910) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,296 (+/- $2,141). About 10.9% of families and 12.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.2% of those under age 18 and 16.6% of those age 65 or over.[33]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 8,244 people, 3,258 households, and 1,941 families residing in the town. The population density was 2,661.7 people per square mile. There were 3,425 housing units at an average density of 1,105.8 per square mile. The racial makeup of the town was 91.97% White, 2.80% African American, 0.13% Native American, 1.97% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.16% from other races, and 1.35% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.80% of the population.[31][31][32]

There were 3,258 households out of which 30.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.0% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.4% were non-families. 33.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 3.12.[31][32]

In the town, the population was spread out with 23.9% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 31.2% from 25 to 44, 21.6% from 45 to 64, and 15.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 92 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.5 males.[31][32]

The median income for a household in the town was $44,667, and the median income for a family was $56,484. Males had a median income of $41,089 versus $30,016 for females. The per capita income for the town was $20,577. About 6.9% of families and 11.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.4% of those under age 18 and 11% of those age 65 or over.[31][32]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Newton operates within the Faulkner Act under the Council-Manager form of municipal government (Plan B), implemented based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission as of July 1, 1978.[34] The town is governed by a five-member Town Council, whose members are chosen in nonpartisan elections to four-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats coming up for election in May of even years in alternating fashion. The council selects a mayor and deputy mayor from among its members at a reorganization meeting held after each election.[7]

As of 2013, members of the Town Council are Mayor Joseph A. Ricciardo (2014), Deputy Mayor E. Kevin Elvidge (2014), Kristen S. Becker (2016), Sandra Lee Diglio (2014) and Daniel G. Flynn (2016).[4][35][35]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Newton is located in the 5th Congressional District[36] and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.[10][37][38]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[39] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[40][41] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[42][43]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Alison Littell McHose (R, Franklin) and Parker Space (R, Wantage Township).[44][45] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[46] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[47]

Sussex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose five members are elected at-large on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director from among its members, with day-to-day supervision of the operation of the county delegated to a County Administrator.[48] As of 2013, Sussex County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Richard Vohden (R, Green Township, 2013),[49] Deputy Director Phillip R. Crabb (R, Franklin, 2014),[50] George Graham (R, Stanhope, 2013),[51] Dennis J. Mudrick (R, Sparta Township, 2015)[52] and Gail Phoebus (R, Andover Township, 2015).[53][48] Graham was chosen in April 2013 to fill the seat vacated by Parker Space, who had been chosen to fill a vacancy in the New Jersey General Assembly.[54] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Jeff Parrott,[55] Sheriff Michael F. Strada[56] and Surrogate Gary R. Chiusano (R, filling the vacancy after the resignation of Nancy Fitzgibbons).[57][54] The County Administrator is John Eskilson[58]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 4,476 registered voters in Newton, of which 881 (19.7% vs. 16.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,537 (34.3% vs. 39.3%) were registered as Republicans and 2,052 (45.8% vs. 44.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 6 voters registered to other parties.[59] Among the town's 2010 Census population, 56.0% (vs. 65.8% in Sussex County) were registered to vote, including 71.0% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 86.5% countywide).[59][60]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 1,546 votes here (50.9% vs. 59.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,395 votes (45.9% vs. 38.2%) and other candidates with 87 votes (2.9% vs. 2.1%), among the 3,038 ballots cast by the town's 4,645 registered voters, for a turnout of 65.4% (vs. 68.3% in Sussex County).[61] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 1,747 votes here (54.8% vs. 59.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,359 votes (42.6% vs. 38.7%) and other candidates with 62 votes (1.9% vs. 1.5%), among the 3,189 ballots cast by the town's 4,418 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.2% (vs. 76.9% in Sussex County).[62] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 1,903 votes here (59.6% vs. 63.9% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,220 votes (38.2% vs. 34.4%) and other candidates with 54 votes (1.7% vs. 1.3%), among the 3,191 ballots cast by the town's 4,359 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.2% (vs. 77.7% in the whole county).[63]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,161 votes here (57.0% vs. 63.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 620 votes (30.4% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 203 votes (10.0% vs. 9.1%) and other candidates with 34 votes (1.7% vs. 1.3%), among the 2,037 ballots cast by the town's 4,323 registered voters, yielding a 47.1% turnout (vs. 52.3% in the county).[64]

Education[edit]

The Newton Public School District serves students in Kindergarten through 12th grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[65]) are Merriam Avenue School[66] (490 students; grades K-5), Halsted Street Middle School[67] (245; 6-8) and Newton High School[68] (790; 9-12).[69][70] The district's enrollment includes high school students from Andover Borough and Andover and Green townships, who attend the high school as part of sending/receiving relationships.[71]

Northwest Christian School, a private school that educates in Pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade, was established in 1966.[72]

Transportation[edit]

U.S. Route 206 and New Jersey Route 94 converge in downtown Newton.[73] Interstate 80 is accessible approximately 13 miles to the south.

The nearest New Jersey Transit rail station is Netcong, approximately 12 miles (19 km) to the south. Lakeland Bus Lines provides limited service between Newton and New York. Newton Airport is a public-use airport located 3 miles (4.8 km) south of the central business district.[74]

Local bus service is provided by the Skylands Connect bus, which connects to Sparta, Hamburg, and Sussex.[75]

Medical[edit]

Newton Memorial Hospital opened in the early 1930s, during the Great Depression. The medical center was established thanks to a willed gift of $35,000 from Thomas Murray (to be specifically used to establish a hospital in Newton) and a $100,000 bequest from Clarence Linn. According to their website, "Newton Memorial Hospital is a short-term, fully accredited, 146-bed acute care, not-for-profit hospital serving more than 250,000 people in Warren and Sussex counties in New Jersey, Pike County in Pennsylvania and southern Orange County in New York."[76]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Newton include:

Points of interest[edit]

Climate[edit]

This climatic region is typified by large seasonal temperature differences, with warm to hot (and often humid) summers and cold (sometimes severely cold) winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Newton has a humid continental climate, abbreviated "Dfb" on climate maps.[97]

References[edit]

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  5. ^ Town Manager, Town of Newton. Accessed June 28, 2012.
  6. ^ Municipal Clerk, Town of Newton. Accessed June 28, 2012.
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  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Town of Newton, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
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  42. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  88. ^ Goldstein, Richard. "Leonard LaRue, Rescuer in the Korean War, Dies at 87", The New York Times, October 20, 2001. Accessed June 28, 2012. "Brother Marinus Leonard LaRue, who as a merchant marine captain in the Korean War evacuated 14,000 refugees from a besieged North Korean port, died on Sunday at St. Paul's Abbey in Newton, N.J.... In 1954, he left the sea to join the Benedictines at St. Paul's Abbey, where he lived until his death."
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  97. ^ Climate Summary for Newton, New Jersey

Reading list[edit]

  • Gordon, Kate; McCabe, Wayne T. (1998). Newton (Images of America). Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing. 
  • McCabe, Wayne T.; Gordon, Kate (1996). A Penny A View...An Album of Postcard Views...Newton, N.J. Newton, New Jersey: Historic Preservation Alternatives. 
  • Wright, Kevin W. (1999). Around The Green, Newton, New Jersey. Newton, N.J.: Minisink Press. 

External links[edit]