Newton County, Arkansas

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Newton County, Arkansas
Boxley Valley 001.jpg
Map of Arkansas highlighting Newton County
Location in the state of Arkansas
Map of the United States highlighting Arkansas
Arkansas's location in the U.S.
Founded December 14, 1842
Named for Thomas Willoughby Newton
Seat Jasper
Largest city Jasper
Area
 • Total 823 sq mi (2,132 km2)
 • Land 821 sq mi (2,126 km2)
 • Water 2.3 sq mi (6 km2), 0.3%
Population
 • (2010) 8,330
 • Density 10/sq mi (4/km²)
Congressional districts 3rd, 4th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5

Newton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 8,330.[1] The county seat is Jasper.[2] Newton County is Arkansas's 46th county, formed on December 14, 1842, and named for Thomas W. Newton, an Arkansas Congressman. It is an alcohol prohibition or dry county.

Newton County is part of the Harrison , AR Micropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

"Newton County was formed in 1842 and named for Thomas W. Newton, an Arkansas Congressman. The Choctaw Indians once lived in the hill country. The landscapes of Newton County are the rugged and mountainous Ozark Mountains. The Ozark National Forest provides wilderness hiking, backpacking, camping, and hunting. The Buffalo National River, the nation's first federally protected river, is one of the last free-flowing streams in mid-America and offers clear blue water for fishing and canoeing along the towering limestone bluffs. In the 1940's the Army Corp of Engineers surveyed the Buffalo River Vally for a Hydro Electric dam near the Hwy 65 Bridge. Local fought and managed to keep their ancestral lands. In the early 1970's the National Park service started forcing the people to sell off the lands for the National River [Herb Van Deven] a local teacher fought to keep his land and was still forced out, The county seat is Jasper where the county courthouse is located. As of the 2000 census, Newton County had a population of 8,608 residents." [3]

Newton County residents were very divided during the Civil War, serving in both the Confederate and Union armies. John Cecil, who had earlier served as Newton County's sheriff, served as a Confederate Captain. Jasper blacksmith James R. Vanderpool (ca. 1832-1880) served as Captain of Union Company C, 1st Regiment Arkansas Infantry Volunteers, while farmer and teacher John McCoy (1820–1903) served as Captain of Union Company F, 1st Regiment Arkansas Infantry Volunteers. Many Newton County citizens served under each of these men, as well as in other units. As an example of how the war divided families, Confederate Captain Cecil's brother, Sam, served as a sergeant in Union Company D, 2nd Regiment Arkansas Cavalry Volunteers. Violence took a severe toll on the civilian population, and at one point, Captains McCoy and Vanderpool escorted 20 wagons of Unionist families from Newton County to Missouri to seek refuge.[4]

Geography[edit]

Elk are often seen roaming the Boxley Valley of the Buffalo National River in the early morning

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 823 square miles (2,130 km2), of which 821 square miles (2,130 km2) is land and 2.3 square miles (6.0 km2) (0.3%) is water.[5]

Newton County lies almost entirely within the rugged Boston Mountain range of the Ozark Mountains where elevations exceed 2,500 feet (760 m). The Buffalo National River, a popular destination for canoeing and recreation, runs through the county from west to east. Highway 7, which traverses the county from north to south, has been rated as one of the most scenic drives in the region.

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

National protected areas[edit]

Attractions[edit]

24 Hours of Horseshoe Hell (24HHH) is an annual rock-climbing competition held at Horseshoe Canyon Ranch in Newton County.[6] Using difficulty ratings based on the Yosemite Decimal System, teams of two attempt to climb as many routes as possible in 24 hours. The sandstone walls of the canyon has over 411 established routes. The event was first held in 2006, and was rated by Climbing magazine as one of the most difficult endurance events in the nation.[7][8]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 1,758
1860 3,393 93.0%
1870 4,374 28.9%
1880 6,120 39.9%
1890 9,950 62.6%
1900 12,538 26.0%
1910 10,612 −15.4%
1920 11,199 5.5%
1930 10,564 −5.7%
1940 10,881 3.0%
1950 8,685 −20.2%
1960 5,963 −31.3%
1970 5,844 −2.0%
1980 7,756 32.7%
1990 7,666 −1.2%
2000 8,608 12.3%
2010 8,330 −3.2%
Est. 2013 8,064 −3.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
1790-1960[10] 1900-1990[11]
1990-2000[12] 2010-2013[1]
Age pyramid Newton County[13]

As of the 2000 United States Census,[14] there were 8,608 people, 3,500 households, and 2,495 families residing in the county. The population density was 4/km² (10/sq mi), one of the most sparse among county populations in Arkansas. There were 4,316 housing units at an average density of 5 per square mile (2/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 99.29% White, 0.00% Black or African American, 0.56% Native American, 0.06% Asian, 0.00% Pacific Islander, 0.09% from other races, and 0.00% from two or more races. 0.00% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 3,500 households out of which 32.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.00% were married couples living together, 7.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.70% were non-families. 26.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the county the population was spread out with 24.90% under the age of 18, 7.60% from 18 to 24, 25.00% from 25 to 44, 27.60% from 45 to 64, and 14.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 102.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $24,756, and the median income for a family was $30,134. Males had a median income of $22,406 versus $17,654 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,788. About 15.70% of families and 20.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.80% of those under age 18 and 16.90% of those age 65 or over.

Native residents of Newton County were interviewed in 1970 for research being done by a doctoral student at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. A Ph.D. degree was awarded to Bethany K. Dumas in May 1971 after she completed "A Study of the Dialect of Newton County, Arkansas." Results are discussed in two of her published articles/chapters: “The Morphology of Newton County, Arkansas: An Exercise in Studying Ozark Dialect,” Mid–South Folklore 3 (1975), 115–125, and “Southern Mountain English” Chapter 5 of The Workings of Language, ed. R. S. Wheeler, Westport, CT, and London: Praeger, 1999, 67-79.

Communities[edit]

City[edit]

Town[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Townships[edit]

Townships in Newton County, Arkansas as of 2010

Townships in Arkansas are the divisions of a county. Each township includes unincorporated areas; some may have incorporated cities or towns within part of their boundaries. Arkansas townships have limited purposes in modern times. However, the United States Census does list Arkansas population based on townships (sometimes referred to as "county subdivisions" or "minor civil divisions"). Townships are also of value for historical purposes in terms of genealogical research. Each town or city is within one or more townships in an Arkansas county based on census maps and publications. The townships of Newton County are listed below; listed in parentheses are the cities, towns, and/or census-designated places that are fully or partially inside the township. [15][16]

Township FIPS code ANSI code
(GNIS ID)
Population
center(s)
Pop.
(2010)
Pop.
density
(/mi²)
Pop.
density
(/km²)
Total area
(mi²)
Total area
(km²)
Land area
(mi²)
Land area
(km²)
Water area
(mi²)
Water area
(km²)
Geographic coordinates
Big Creek 05-90270 00069672 244 4.97 1.92 49.135 127.3 49.084 127.1 0.051 0.1321 35°52′12″N 93°04′44″W / 35.870031°N 93.078980°W / 35.870031; -93.078980
Boston 05-90417 00069673 65 2.03 0.79 31.965 82.79 31.947 82.74 0.018 0.04662 35°48′08″N 93°29′11″W / 35.802293°N 93.486503°W / 35.802293; -93.486503
Grove 05-91545 00069674 Western Grove 907 26.04 10.06 34.979 90.60 34.825 90.20 0.154 0.3989 36°02′16″N 92°58′12″W / 36.037719°N 92.970012°W / 36.037719; -92.970012
Hasty 05-91641 00069675 268 14.09 5.44 19.123 49.53 19.014 49.25 0.109 0.2823 35°59′59″N 93°02′12″W / 35.999647°N 93.036620°W / 35.999647; -93.036620
Hickory Grove 05-91695 00069676 129 7.60 2.93 16.989 44.00 16.980 43.98 0.009 0.02331 35°50′24″N 93°16′54″W / 35.839875°N 93.281762°W / 35.839875; -93.281762
Hudson 05-91788 00069677 327 17.33 6.69 18.951 49.08 18.873 48.88 0.078 0.2020 35°56′10″N 93°14′33″W / 35.936140°N 93.242629°W / 35.936140; -93.242629
Jackson 05-91872 00069678 Jasper 1,620 27.19 10.50 59.933 155.2 59.573 154.3 0.360 0.9324 36°00′10″N 93°10′50″W / 36.002703°N 93.180608°W / 36.002703; -93.180608
Jefferson 05-91941 00069679 284 3.54 1.37 80.396 208.2 80.312 208.0 0.084 0.2176 35°49′04″N 93°22′46″W / 35.817879°N 93.379476°W / 35.817879; -93.379476
Jones 05-91995 00069680 29 1.19 0.46 24.429 63.27 24.410 63.22 0.019 0.04921 35°44′41″N 92°59′42″W / 35.744590°N 92.994921°W / 35.744590; -92.994921
Kentucky 05-92031 00069681 60 1.49 0.58 40.325 104.4 40.222 104.2 0.103 0.2668 35°53′06″N 93°26′34″W / 35.885138°N 93.442773°W / 35.885138; -93.442773
Lincoln 05-92211 00069682 248 17.32 6.69 14.329 37.11 14.319 37.09 0.010 0.02590 35°53′10″N 93°16′14″W / 35.886049°N 93.270498°W / 35.886049; -93.270498
Low Gap 05-92295 00069683 268 11.45 4.42 23.487 60.83 23.397 60.60 0.090 0.2331 36°01′57″N 93°18′32″W / 36.032597°N 93.308932°W / 36.032597; -93.308932
Marble Falls 05-92373 02406958 932 15.86 6.12 59.044 152.9 58.751 152.2 0.293 0.7589 36°04′43″N 93°09′07″W / 36.078548°N 93.151902°W / 36.078548; -93.151902
Murray 05-92655 00069685 172 10.30 3.98 16.732 43.34 16.696 43.24 0.036 0.09324 35°56′42″N 93°19′38″W / 35.944909°N 93.327241°W / 35.944909; -93.327241
Osage 05-92772 00069686 238 7.62 2.94 31.285 81.03 31.221 80.86 0.064 0.1658 36°05′13″N 93°25′04″W / 36.087078°N 93.417719°W / 36.087078; -93.417719
Pleasant Hill 05-92919 00069687 386 5.27 2.04 73.285 189.8 73.176 189.5 0.109 0.2823 35°47′47″N 93°13′41″W / 35.796427°N 93.228082°W / 35.796427; -93.228082
Plumlee 05-92928 00069688 223 8.71 3.36 25.767 66.74 25.608 66.32 0.159 0.4118 36°04′45″N 93°18′20″W / 36.079286°N 93.305643°W / 36.079286; -93.305643
Polk 05-92949 00069689 224 4.64 1.79 48.347 125.2 48.295 125.1 0.052 0.1347 35°53′39″N 92°59′27″W / 35.894152°N 92.990789°W / 35.894152; -92.990789
Ponca 05-92958 00069690 158 8.70 3.36 18.253 47.28 18.155 47.02 0.098 0.2538 36°01′30″N 93°22′51″W / 36.025099°N 93.380959°W / 36.025099; -93.380959
Prairie 05-93006 00069691 252 14.77 5.70 17.077 44.23 17.064 44.20 0.013 0.03367 36°04′01″N 93°01′26″W / 36.066934°N 93.023884°W / 36.066934; -93.023884
Richland 05-93150 00069692 281 5.81 2.24 48.386 125.3 48.335 125.2 0.051 0.1321 35°45′24″N 93°06′29″W / 35.756678°N 93.107967°W / 35.756678; -93.107967
Van Buren 05-93774 00069694 185 5.32 2.05 34.885 90.35 34.764 90.04 0.121 0.3134 35°57′07″N 93°25′21″W / 35.952003°N 93.422449°W / 35.952003; -93.422449
White 05-93990 00069696 830 23.14 8.93 36.086 93.46 35.876 92.92 0.210 0.5439 35°56′50″N 93°06′25″W / 35.947124°N 93.106975°W / 35.947124; -93.106975
Source: "Census 2010 U.S. Gazetteer Files: County Subdivisions in Arkansas". U.S. Census Bureau, Geography Division. 

Source: "Census 2010 U.S. Gazetteer Files". U.S. Census Bureau, Geography Division. 

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 23, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ http://local.arkansas.gov/local.php?agency=Newton%20County
  4. ^ Lackey, Walter F. History of Newton County, Arkansas, Point Lookout, MO: S of O Press, 1950.
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ "Rock Climbing." www.horseshoecanyonduderanch.com. Retrieved September 8, 2014.
  7. ^ Robinson, Bob. "Rock around the clock: Crag climbers put themselves through 24 Hours of Horseshoe Hell." Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, October 21, 2013. 6E.
  8. ^ Hewitt, Andrew. "UPDATED: Rave Reviews and Sleepless Sending at 24 Hours of Horseshoe Hell." www.rockandice.com, October 10, 2013. Retrieved September 8, 2014.
  9. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 23, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved May 23, 2014. 
  11. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 23, 2014. 
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 23, 2014. 
  13. ^ Based on 2000 census data
  14. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  15. ^ U. S. Census Bureau. 2011 Boundary and Annexation Survey (BAS): Newton County, AR (Map). http://www2.census.gov/geo/pvs/bas/bas11/st05_ar/cou/c05101_newton/BAS11C20510100000_000.pdf. Retrieved 2011-06-28.
  16. ^ "Arkansas: 2010 Census Block Maps - County Subdivision". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 28, 2014. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 35°56′08″N 93°13′19″W / 35.93556°N 93.22194°W / 35.93556; -93.22194