Newtonmore railway station

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Newtonmore National Rail
Scottish Gaelic: Bail Ùr an t-Slèibh
Newtonmore
Location
Place Newtonmore
Local authority Highland
Coordinates 57°03′34″N 4°07′06″W / 57.0595°N 4.1184°W / 57.0595; -4.1184Coordinates: 57°03′34″N 4°07′06″W / 57.0595°N 4.1184°W / 57.0595; -4.1184
Grid reference NN715984
Operations
Station code NWR
Managed by First ScotRail
Number of platforms 1
Live arrivals/departures and station information
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2002/03  4,184
2004/05 Increase 5,396
2005/06 Increase 6,815
2006/07 Decrease 6,631
2007/08 Increase 7,060
2008/09 Increase 7,446
2009/10 Increase 7,972
2010/11 Increase 9,484
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Newtonmore from Office of Rail Regulation statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
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Newtonmore railway station is a railway station serving the village of Newtonmore, Highland, Scotland. The station is managed by First ScotRail and is on the Highland Main Line.

History[edit]

The station was opened by the Inverness and Perth Junction Railway on 9 September 1863.[1] The original station buildings were constructed of wood and destroyed in a fire in April 1893[2] A replacement station building in stone was erected in 1893.[3]

A serious accident occurred on 2 August 1894 when the morning passenger train from Perth to Inverness collided with a goods train. One passenger was killed and several were badly injured.[4]

On 13 September 1900, James Ormiston, a brakesman was killed in a shunting accident at the station.[5]

Current services[edit]

The station is served by trains to Inverness and Glasgow or Edinburgh, a daily train service to London King's Cross and a nightly Caledonian Sleeper service to London Euston. The station has just one platform; since it was shortened the main building is now a holiday home and is now no longer part of the platform. Because the platform is short, express services overrun the platform commonly.[citation needed] The station was listed for closure[when?] but was saved because it provided crucial transport links to the Scottish and English capitals daily.

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Blair Atholl   East Coast
East Coast Main Line
Sundays only, southbound only
  Kingussie
Dalwhinnie   First ScotRail
Highland Main Line
  Kingussie
Dalwhinnie   First ScotRail
Highland Caledonian Sleeper
  Kingussie
Historical railways
Dalwhinnie
Line and station open
  Inverness and Perth Junction Railway   Kingussie
Line and station open

References[edit]

  1. ^ Aberdeen Journal. Wednesday 16 September 1863
  2. ^ Glasgow Herald - Saturday 22 April 1893
  3. ^ The Buildings of Scotland, Highland and Islands. John Gifford. Yale University Press. 1992. ISBN 0300096269
  4. ^ Western Times, Friday 3 August 1894
  5. ^ Dundee Courier - Friday 14 September 1900