Ngunnawal language

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Ngunnawal
Gundungurra
Onerwal
Northern Inland Yuin
Region New South Wales & ACT, Australia
Ethnicity Ngunnawal people, Gandangara people
Native speakers
(no estimate available)
Dialects
Ngunawal
Gundungurra
Language codes
ISO 639-3 Either:
xul – Ngunawal
xrd – Gundungurra
AIATSIS[1] D3, S60
Glottolog nort2760[2]

Ngunnawal or Gundungurra is an Australian Aboriginal language, the traditional language of the Ngunnawal and Gandangara peoples. There are contradictory claims as to whether they are one language or two. The name Burragorang is applied to either.

Classification[edit]

Ngunawal is generally classified with the Ngarigo language of the limestone plains of Monaro (Maneroo) in New South Wales to the Australian Capital Territory across the Monaro tableland through to the Australian Alps of New South Wales and Victoria Snowy Mountains. They fall within the tentative (and perhaps geographic) Yuin–Kuric group of the Pama–Nyungan family.[3]

Ngunnawal words[edit]

Ngunnawal words and phrases and English translations
Ngunnawal English Ref.
Balbo Kangaroo rat [4]
Bamir Long [5]
Bargang Yellow box [6][7]
Berra Boomerang [8]
Bimbi Bird [7]
Bimbiang Shield [9]
Bindugan Mussel [10]
Birrigai To laugh [11][12]
Budyan Birds [13]
Bunburung Small lizard [14]
Bunduluk Rosella [15]
Bunima Blow (as wind) [10]
Burrai Quick [16]
Burrum-bah Where the kangaroo, the wallaby, bounces over the rocks [17]
Bural Day [18]
Burin Stringybark [19]
Dhangarn Food [20]
Daramoolen Dreaming [10]
Darwa A transition for ceremony [17]
Dulwa Casuarina trees [7]
Dyindan Ring-tail possum [10]
Galu Crane [21]
Gamburra Flowers [22]
Gang-gang Gang-gang Cockatoo [23][24]
Giliruk pee wee [25]
Ginninderra Sparkling light [26]
Ginin-ginin-derry Sparkling, throwing out little rays of light
(possibly a description of a waterfall)
[27]
Gubbity Pipeclay [10]
Gubur Dhaura Red ochre ground [28]
Gudali To hunt [29]
Guginya Kookaburra [29]
Gula Koala [29]
Gulwan Younger sister [10]
Gummiuk Bulrushes [7]
Gunyan Slow [30]
Jedbinbilla A place where boys become men [11][17][31]
Gurubun Koala [32]
Kubbadang Moon [10]
Karrugang Magpie [33]
Kudyera Fighting club [34]
Madi Very [10]
Mulleun Eagle [35]
Mulunggang Platypus [36]
Mundang Canoe [37]
Mundawari Bandicoot [38]
Munjuwa Tracks, Foot [10]
Mura Pathway [29][39]
Mura gadi Pathways for searching [40]
Murra Bidgee Mullangari Keeping the pathway to our ancestors alive [41]
Murrung Lizard [42]
Nangi To see or look [43]
Narragunnawali Alive/well-being/coming together [44]
Nengi Bamir See far (view) [7]
Ngadyung Water [37]
Ngunna yerrabi yanggu You’re welcome to leave your footprints on our land [45]
Nguru Camp [37]
Pajong Ngunnawal clan group [10]
Tuggeranong Cold place [46]
Umbagong Axe [47][48]
Walga Hawk [49]
Wallabalooa Ngunnawal clan group [10]
Warabin Curlew [50]
Wark Crow [17]
Warrumbul Youth [51]
Weereewa Lake George
(translates roughly to 'bad water')
[17][52][53]
Wimbaliri Drink [10]
Winnunga nimmityjah Strong health [54]
Winyu Sun [55]
Wirria Tree goanna [56]
Woggabaliri Play [57]
Yarrh Running water [58]
Yeal-am-bid-gie Molonglo River [59]
Yerra Swim,[7] to fly like a bird[60]
Yerrabi To walk [61]
Yerradhang Eucalypt tree [10]
Yumba Eel [62]
Yuyu Mopoke [10]

More words are compiled online in The Wiradyuri and Other Languages of New South Wales,[24] an article by Robert H. Mathews first published in the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute in 1904.

The word Gungahlin is a possible ngunnawal word. Gungahlin is the name for a district in Canberra, which gets its name from the homestead built in 1862 by Edward Crace called 'Goongarline', which is said to be an Aboriginal word for 'white man's house', or mean 'wonderful' or 'beautiful'.[63]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ngunnawal at the Australian Indigenous Languages Database, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies  (see the info box for additional links)
  2. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Ngunnawal". Glottolog 2.2. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  3. ^ "AIATSIS Language and Peoples Thesaurus". Archived from the original on 19 March 2011. 
  4. ^ "Balbo Place". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  5. ^ "Bamir Square". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  6. ^ "Bargang Crescent". 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f "Public Place Names (Belconnen) Determination 2004 (No 1)". 8 September 2004. Archived from the original on 16 July 2012. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  8. ^ "Berra Close". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  9. ^ "Bimbiang Crescent". 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Public Place Names (Ngunnawal) Determination 2013 (No 1)". 
  11. ^ a b "Aboriginal connections to Tidbinbilla". Archived from the original on 10 May 2013. 
  12. ^ "Birrigai Square". 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  13. ^ "Budyan Court". 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  14. ^ "Bunburung Close". 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  15. ^ "Bunduluk Crescent". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  16. ^ "Burrai Place". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  17. ^ a b c d e "Stories from Ngunnawal Country - Mount Ainslie - The Ngunnawal Peoples". Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations. Archived from the original on 26 August 2013. 
  18. ^ "Bural Court". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  19. ^ "Government Notices: Public Place Names Act 1989". 14 April 1993. Archived from the original on 16 July 2012. 
  20. ^ Extravaganza at Tidbinbilla, 2011, retrieved 10 October 2013 
  21. ^ "Galu Vista". 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  22. ^ "Gamburra Street". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  23. ^ "Gang-Gang". July 2005. Archived from the original on 15 May 2013. 
  24. ^ a b Robert Hamilton Mathews. "The Wiradyuri and Other Languages of New South Wales". 
  25. ^ "Giliruk Crescent". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  26. ^ "Middle School Ginninderra Award". Burgmann Anglican School. 
  27. ^ Doug Finlayson (4 May 2013). "Ginninderra Catchment Area Historical Notes". 
  28. ^ "Where The Future Meets The Past: Heritage Enshrined In Our Newest Park Featured". 19 April 2012. Archived from the original on 14 April 2013. 
  29. ^ a b c d Denise Sutherland. "The Canberra Puzzle Book". Archived from the original on 20 July 2008. 
  30. ^ "Gunyan Place". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  31. ^ "Aboriginal Heritage and the Cultural Landscape of the ACT". Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  32. ^ "Gurubun Close". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  33. ^ "Karrugang Circuit". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  34. ^ "Kudyera Place". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  35. ^ "Mulleun Close". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  36. ^ Terry Browne (October 2008), AFP - Platypus A survival story 
  37. ^ a b c "Public Place Names (Greenway) Determination 2004 (No 2)". 8 September 2004. Archived from the original on 16 July 2012. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  38. ^ "Mundawari Circuit". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  39. ^ "Mura® AIATSIS Collections Catalogue". Archived from the original on 24 September 2013. 
  40. ^ Jan Fullerton. "Mura Gadi: Foreword". National Library of Australia. Archived from the original on 27 March 2012. 
  41. ^ "Ngarrindjeri, Ngunnawal and Ngambri come together for the river dance to maintain an important tradition". National Indigenous Times. 9 October 2013. 
  42. ^ "Murrung Crescent". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  43. ^ "Nangi Place". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  44. ^ "Peace Park". National Capital Authority. Archived from the original on 12 February 2006. 
  45. ^ "Menagerie: Contemporary Indigenous Sculpture: exhibition opening". National Museum Australia. 12 July 2012. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  46. ^ "Our School". Gowrie Primary School. Archived from the original on 9 April 2013. 
  47. ^ "LANDCARE TOUR DE CREEK : GINNINDERRA CREEK". Archived from the original on 9 February 2012. 
  48. ^ Umbagong Landcare Group, Let’s Discover Umbagong District Park, archived from the original on 3 May 2013 
  49. ^ "Walga Place". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  50. ^ "Warabin Crescent". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  51. ^ "Warrumbul Street". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  52. ^ "Choreographic Fellowship options". Archived from the original on 15 June 2005. 
  53. ^ David Mackenzie (2013), Werriwa (Bad Water) 
  54. ^ Jane Belfrage (29 March 1989), Aborigines care for their health, against the odds, The Canberra Times (reproduced on Trove) 
  55. ^ "ATSIC News". 2002. Archived from the original on 10 May 2004. 
  56. ^ "Wirria Circuit". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  57. ^ Australian Studies, archived from the original on 10 August 2013 
  58. ^ "Yass Valley Management Plan". 2005. Archived from the original on 2 October 2011. 
  59. ^ Borders Of The Australian Capital Territory, retrieved 10 October 2013 
  60. ^ "Yerra Court". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  61. ^ "Yerrabi Pond". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  62. ^ "Yumba Avenue". ACT Government. 22 May 2013. Retrieved 10 October 2013. 
  63. ^ "About the Gungahlin Region". Archived from the original on 21 August 2008. 
  • Mathews, R. H. (Jul–Dec 1904). "The Wiradyuri and other languages of New South Wales". The Journal of the Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland (Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland) 34: 284–305. doi:10.2307/2843103. JSTOR 2843103.